Licensing OER and other Materials for Teachers and Curriculum Administrators/Specialists

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These are slides to support Jason Neiffer's presentation "Licensing OER and other Materials for Teachers and Curriculum Administrators/Specialists," at iNACOL in October 2013.

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Licensing OER and other Materials for Teachers and Curriculum Administrators/Specialists

  1. 1. Licensing OER and other Materials for Teachers and Curriculum Administrators/Specialists Image: Danilela Hartmann Jason Neffer, M.Sci., ABD Montana Digital Academy the University of Montana @techsavvyteach http://www.techsavvyteacher.com
  2. 2. Paperless Handouts: http://www.workshophandouts.com/licensingoer
  3. 3. My vantage point…
  4. 4. Image: Tagxedo
  5. 5. Image: Frog Miller/Available via CC BY
  6. 6. Image: Frog Miller available by CC BY
  7. 7. “best practices” “doesn’t constitute not legal advice” “may or may not” “legal obligation” “we cannot tell you if that is commercial or not”
  8. 8. The problem…
  9. 9. “Why would bother with all of this Creative Commons nonsense; even images marked with the license are clearly not...”
  10. 10. “Listen… I understand what you are trying to accomplish here but I am 100% sure that nobody is going to come after me for using any materials I want in a classroom.”
  11. 11. So what?
  12. 12. Broad Philosophy
  13. 13. Modeling     Expecta0ons   Guidance   Follow-­‐up  
  14. 14. Licensing Your Own Materials
  15. 15. Modeling     Expecta0ons   Guidance   Follow-­‐up  
  16. 16. h8p://jasonlinks.net/oerpolicy  
  17. 17. Who  owns  the  materials?    The   teacher?    The  district?   Do  you  want  materials  to  be   remixed  and  adapted?   Do  you  want  to  allow  end  users  to   profit  off  the  use  of  the  materials?   Do  you  want  to  restrict  their   future  licensing  in  the  future?  
  18. 18. Creative Commons makes sharing easy The internet makes it easy for people to share and build on each other’s creations. But sometimes the law makes it hard. Six licenses for sharing your work Whenever you snap a photograph, record a song, publish an article, or put your original writing online, that work is automatically considered “all rights reserved” in the eyes of copyright law. In many cases, that means that other people can’t reuse or remix your work without asking for your permission first. But what if you want others to reuse your work? If you want to give people the right to share, use, and even build upon a work you’ve created, consider publishing under a Creative Commons license. Our free, easy-to-use licenses provide a simple, standardized way to give the public permission to share and use your creative work — on conditions of your choosing. CC licenses let you easily change your copyright terms from “all rights reserved” to “some rights reserved.” Creative Commons licenses are not an alternative to copyright. By default, copyright allows only limited reuses without your permission. CC licenses let you grant additional permissions to the public, allowing reuse on the terms best suited to your needs while reserving some rights for yourself. We’ve collaborated with copyright experts around the world to ensure that our licenses work globally. If you are looking for content that you can freely and legally use, there is a wealth of CC-licensed creativity available to you. There are hundreds of millions of works—from songs and videos to scientific and academic material—available to the public for free and legal use under the terms of our licenses, with more being contributed every day. A CC license lets you decide which rights you’d like to keep, and it clearly conveys to those using your work how they’re permitted to use it without asking you in advance. What Is Creative Commons? Step 1: Choose License Features Step 2: Get a License Creative Commons is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting an open and accessible internet that is enriched with free knowledge and creative resources for people around the world to use, share, and cultivate. Publishing under a Creative Commons license is easy. First, choose the conditions that you want to apply to your work. Based on your choices, you will get a license that clearly indicates how other people may use your creative work. Our easy-to-use licenses provide a simple, standardized way to give the public permission to share and use your creative work — on conditions of your choice. CC licenses let you change your copyright terms from the default of “all rights reserved” to “some rights reserved.” Millions of people use CC licenses on some of the world’s most popular platforms for user-generated content. When you use a CC license to share your photos, videos, or blog, your creation joins a globally accessible pool of resources that includes the work of artists, educators, scientists, and governments. Creative Commons has waived all copyright and related or neighboring rights to this guide using the CC0 Public Domain Dedication. Attribution Attribution All CC licenses require that others who use your work in any way must give you credit the way you request, but not in a way that suggests you endorse them or their use. If they want to use your work without giving you credit or for endorsement purposes, they must get your permission first. CC BY ShareAlike You let others copy, distribute, display, perform, and modify your work, as long as they distribute any modified work on the same terms. If they want to distribute modified works under other terms, they must get your permission first. Attribution — ShareAlike CC BY-SA Attribution — NoDerivs CC BY-ND Attribution — NonCommercial CC BY-NC NoDerivs You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only original copies of your work. If they want to modify your work, they must get your permission first. h8p://jasonlinks.net/sharingyourwork   NonCommercial You let others copy, distribute, display, perform, and (unless you have chosen NoDerivs) modify and use your work for any purpose other than commercially unless they get your permission first. Attribution — NonCommercial — ShareAlike CC BY-NC-SA Attribution — NonCommercial — NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
  19. 19. Attribution (BY) ▪ Non-commercial (NC) ▪ No derivatives (ND) ▪ Copyleft - Share-Alike (SA)‫‏‬ By  Karen  Fasimpaur   available  via  CC  BY    
  20. 20. Attribution (BY) is the least restrictive license
  21. 21. 1.  Check with your district on materials ownership/permission to release resources as open resources. 2.  Be certain that you are vetting OER materials you are using before you release and mind the restrictions. 3.  Confirm and verify what any place that you release your materials is also putting your correct license choice in association with your materials. If you are a teacher…
  22. 22. 1.  Learn with your staff to make sure that they understand the reason for openly releasing materials before they do so. 2.  Pull teachers into the decision of which license to use, but make an institutional decision. 3.  Check to see how your materials are used elsewhere (ask for an email!). 4.  Share successes with your staff to encourage future development. 5.  Develop specific guidance and workflow on HOW licenses are displayed and where materials are released. If you are an administrator…
  23. 23. Purposeful decision-making
  24. 24. Use of OER Materials in Your School
  25. 25. Modeling     Expecta0ons   Guidance   Follow-­‐up  
  26. 26. Freedom  to  Crea0ve   Engaging  Learning   Environments   Mindfulness  to  the   legal  and  philosophical   restric0ons  of  open   licenses  
  27. 27. Perfectly okay to acknowledge Perfectly okay to acknowledge that this is complex… complexity exists in this discussion…
  28. 28. Does  your  use  case  create  limit   what  materials  you  can  use  base   on  license?   How  can  you  cite  the  appropriate   materials?   Do  you  and  your  teachers  have   the  nuanced  skills  to  iden0fy   mislabeled  materials?   Are  you  minding  other  academic   requirements?  
  29. 29. Attribution (BY) ▪ Non-commercial (NC) ▪ No derivatives (ND) ▪ Copyleft - Share-Alike (SA)‫‏‬ By  Karen  Fasimpaur   available  via  CC  BY    
  30. 30. What does “noncommercial” mean? Attribution (BY) ▪ Non-commercial (NC) ▪ No derivatives (ND) ▪ Copyleft - Share-Alike (SA)‫‏‬ By  Karen  Fasimpaur   available  via  CC  BY    
  31. 31. What does “share alike” mean? Attribution (BY) ▪ Non-commercial (NC) ▪ No derivatives (ND) ▪ Copyleft - Share-Alike (SA)‫‏‬ By  Karen  Fasimpaur   available  via  CC  BY    
  32. 32. h8p://jasonlinks.net/cita0onguide  
  33. 33. Provide  a  style  guide  for  teachers   (and  students)   Follow  up  when  observing   teachers  to  help  determine  their   correct  use   Remember  that  other  obliga0ons   might  exist  for  academic  cita0on   Encourage  teachers,  project   par0cipants  and  students  to  log   media/license  use  
  34. 34. Start  with  ve8ed  photo  lists;  you   can  always  go  back  and  add  later.   Avoid  Google  Images/Bing  Images   unless  you  have  a  nuanced  eye  for   it.   If  you  are  working  as  a  teacher  or   with  teachers  on  a  project,  always   do  proof-­‐of-­‐concept  samples   If  it  is  too  good  to  be  true,   perhaps  it  is…  J  
  35. 35. Purposeful decision-making
  36. 36. Websites: www.neiffer.com www.techsavvyteacher.com www.montanadigitalacademy.org www.umt.edu Email: Neiffer(at)gmail.com Twitter: techsavvyteach Google Plus: gplus.to/techsavvyteacher

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