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Educators and Social Networking Webinar Slides

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The 2012 Survey of K-12 Educators on Social Networking, Online Communities, and Web 2.0 Tools webinar was held on December 11, 2012. Hosted by Lisa Schmucki, Founder and CEO of edWeb.net; Kelly …

The 2012 Survey of K-12 Educators on Social Networking, Online Communities, and Web 2.0 Tools webinar was held on December 11, 2012. Hosted by Lisa Schmucki, Founder and CEO of edWeb.net; Kelly Stewart, Sr. Director of Marketing for MMS Education; and Susan Meell, CEO of MMS Education, the webinar gives a brief outline of the 2012 survey's final report.

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  • Craig updated the 2012 chart; headline is changed.
  • Craig added clarification under the chart as to the other communities listed in the survey.
  • Add a call-out and comments
  • Transcript

    • 1. Educators and Social Networking:How and Why Educators are Joining Online Communities December 11, 2012 Presenting new research conducted by MMS Education and co-sponsored by edWeb.net and MCH Strategic Data MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 2012 Copyright 1
    • 2. Introducing the Presenters Susan Meell CEO MMS Education @MMS_Education Lisa Schmucki Founder and CEO edWeb.net @edwebnet Kelly Stewart Senior Director of Marketing MMS Education @MMS_Education © 2012 MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data Data 2
    • 3. Webinar Tips • Use the text chat! Post comments, ask questions, get support. • Close any other applications (like Skype) that use bandwidth. • Maximize your screen for a larger view by using the link in the upper right corner. • Tweeting? @edwebnet @mms_education#edchat #edtech #ce12 • A link to the recording of this webinar, the slides, and a CE certificate will be sent to you after the webinar. • YOU CAN DOWN LOAD A COPY OF THE REPORT AT: www.mmseducation.com , www.edweb.net, or www.mchdata.com MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data
    • 4. Our Presentation Today Presentation of Findings 2012 Survey of K-12 Educators on Social Networking, Online Communities, and Web 2.0 Tools • Growing Support for Connected Educators • Survey Goals, Methodology, Participants • General vs. Education Social Networking Sites • Proprietary Online Communities • Web 2.0 Tools • Devices, Connectivity, Access Policies, and BYOD • Educator Comments: Pros and Cons • What the Research Means for Educators • What the Research Means for the Education Industry • Q&A © 2012 MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data Data 4
    • 5. Growing Support for “Connected Educators” U.S Department of Education 2010 National Education Technology Plan Connected Educators Initiative Connected Educator Month – August 2012 150+ organizations, communities, and companies 400+ events and activities 2,200+ speakers “Social networks can be used to provide educators with The U.S. Department of career-long personal learning tools and resources that Education declared make professional learning timely and relevant as wellAugust 2012 “Connected as an ongoing activity that continually improves Educator Month” practice and evolves their skills over time.” – The National Education Technology Plan 2010 MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 5
    • 6. Survey Goals for 2012 Goals included: • Update the 2009 Study, A Survey of K-12 Educators on Social Networking and Content-Sharing Tools • General social networking sites vs. education-focused sites • Survey principals, teachers, and school librarians • Understand perceived value and concerns • Track usage of other online communities and Web 2.0 tool • School/district policies and Web 2.0 tools NEW • Quality of Internet access in schools for 2012 • Devices educators are using to access online information • School policies regarding BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 6
    • 7. Survey Methodology In 2012, • Online blind survey conducted by MMS Education with the MCH K-12 Educator the survey Database. deployed to • The survey was deployed in September 200,000 2012, to 200,000 randomly selected educators in educators, including the U.S. principals, teachers, and librarians. • Some inherent technology bias since study was conducted only with educators with email addresses. 2009 2012 • Variance in response rates betweenTotal Completed Responses 1,284 694 2009 and 2012 could be attributed toResponse Rate 1.5% .35% several factors -- an incentive was offered in 2009, and the survey was fielded for a longer period of time. MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 7
    • 8. Survey Participants Who participated in the survey? Principals, Teachers, Librarians Similar and consistent participation across job titles in both surveys. 2009 2012 Other Other 3% 4% Principals 19% Principals 30% Teachers Teachers 47% 49% Librarians/ Librarians/ Media Media Specialists Specialists 28% 20% MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 8
    • 9. Educator Participation in Social Networks Are you currently a member of, or have you ever joined, a social networking website for personal, educational, or professional reasons? % who indicated that they are a member of or have ever joined a social networking site 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 2009 61% 2012 All 82% 70%Librarians/Media Specialists 89% 59% Teachers 80% 54% Principals 76% MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 9
    • 10. Educator Participation in Social Networks – Key Findings • Educator membership in social networks has increased from 61% to 82% — 34% growth from 2009 to 2012. • 82% of educators who responded say they are a member of a social networking website. • Membership has grown significantly for all job categories – principals, teachers, and librarians. • Librarians show the highest level of participation, as in Educator 2009, with 89% reporting they have joined a social membership in network. social networks has grown among principals, libra rians and teachers MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 10
    • 11. Educator Participation in Social Networks – Key Findings 2012 Age andyears in 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% the profession appear to be Age 18-34 97% 3% the biggest differentiators Yes in social Age 35-54 85% 15% No networking Age 55+ 75% 25% • Membership in social networks is clearly influenced by age. • The data shows the same trend line for membership when compared to number of years in teaching. MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 11
    • 12. Educator Participation in Social Networks – Key Findings The increase in 100% 97% the number of 78% 85% 80% 75% educators over 65% age 55 who 60% 2009 have joined 47% 2012 social networks 40% has jumped 20% from 47% to 75% since 2009 0% Age 18-34 Age 35-54 Age 55+ • Although age appears to influence membership in social networks, educators over the age of 55 are definitely on board with this new technology. • This is positive news for champions of social networks in education since veteran educators tend to have more authority in decision making and overall influence in educational institutions. MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 12
    • 13. Educator Participation in Social Networks – Key Findings Percent of educators who are members of a social networking site. Female educators 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% are slightly more likely to be 55% 2009 members of a 63% Male social network — Female membership has 79% 2012 increased across 84% both genders since 2009 • 84% of women are members of a social network vs. 79% of men. • In contrast, 63% of women and 55% of men were members of social networks in 2009. • There was no significant difference in participation in social networking by grade level or by metro status (urban, rural, suburban). MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 13
    • 14. General Social Networking WebsitesAre you a member of any of the following general social networking websites? Compared to % that are members, among those who are 2009, members of at least one social network Facebook 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% remains the 85% dominant Facebook 85% site, with 14% significant LinkedIn 41% growth Not asked in 2009 2009 reported for Twitter 39% 2012 LinkedIn Not asked in 2009 Google Plus Google+ 27% Educators very active in Ning 11% 11% Twitter and Google+ MySpace 20% 7% Among those who indicated that they have joined a social networking site, the % who indicated Pinterest was that they are a member of these social networking sites. The communities listed above are written in by many those that received a 5% or greater mention from the survey respondents. respondents MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 14
    • 15. General Social Networking Websites – Differences by Age % that are members, among those who are members of at least one social network Younger 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% educators are 98% Facebook 90% more likely to 91% 91%be members of 56% Twitter and Twitter 39% 53%Google+; older 35% 35% Age 18-34 educators LinkedIn 41% Age 35-44 47% members of 56% Age 45-54 yrs Linked In Google 41% 38% Age 55+ Google+ Plus 30% 16% Age does not 8% 17% appear to be a Ning 11% 9% significant 18% differentiating MySpace 8% 4% factor for 7% Facebook MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 15
    • 16. General Social Networking Websites – Frequency of UsePlease indicate how frequently you visit the sites of which you are a member. Weekly or more frequently Monthly Periodically Seldom/Never 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Facebook 80% 7% 9% 4% Twitter 48% 12% 25% 15%Google Plus Google+ 31% 23% 27% 19% LinkedIn 16% 23% 32% 29% Ning 9% 21% 46% 24% MySpace 4% 8% 86% 2% Note: Small sample sizes for Ning and MySpace MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 16
    • 17. General Social Networking Websites – Frequency of Use by Job Function 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Facebook 87% 82% Facebook has LinkedIn 25% 60% % that are members, among those the highest Twitter 52% 55% who are members of at least one Principals level of Google+ Google Plus 32% 43% % of members that visit weekly or more frequently frequency use Ning 0% 13% by all job MySpace 0% 7%categories, foll Facebook 92% 82% owed by LinkedIn 39% 10% Twitter and Twitter 32% 51% Google+ Teachers Google+ Google Plus 28% 27% Ning 9% 13% MySpace 6% 0% Facebook 93% 80% LinkedIn 52% 21% Twitter 46% Librarians/Media 40% Specialists Google Plus Google+ 30% 26% Ning 18% 10% MySpace 7% 9% MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 17
    • 18. Education-Focused Social NetworksAre you currently a member of any of the following social networking sites thatfocus specifically on education? % that are members, among those who are Several members of at least one social network education- 0% 20% 40% focused social Not asked in 2009 Edmodo networks show 27%significant growth edWeb.net 2% 15% compared Not asked in 2009 ASCD Edge to 2009 – and 9% several new sites Classroom 2.0 5% 9% added to the list We Are Teachers 2% since then 6% Not asked in 2009 Teacher 2.0 5% NSTA Learning Not asked in 2009 2009 Center 4% Not asked in 2009 2012 Educators PLN 3% The communities listed above are those that received a 2% or greater mention from the survey respondents. MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 18
    • 19. EDUCATION-FOCUSED NETWORKS: How frequently UseEducation-Focused Social Networks – Frequency of do educators visit?Please indicate how frequently you visit the sites of which you are a member. Weekly or more frequently Monthly Periodically Seldom/Never 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% edWeb.net 44% 32% 19% 5% Edmodo 42% 26% 23% 9% ASCD Edge 38% 32% 23% 8% Classroom 2.0 26% 35% 32% 6% Teacher 2.0 25% 28% 42% 6% We Are Teachers 22% 17% 54% 7% Educators PLN 14% 43% 24% 19% NSTA Learning Center 11% 48% 33% 7% Note: Small sample size for ASCD, Classroom 2.0, Teacher 2.0, We Are Teachers, Educators PLN and NSTA Learning Center. MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 19
    • 20. Education-Focused Social Networks – Frequency of Use by Job Function 0% 20% 40% 60% Edmodo 21% Members of 33% % that are members, among those 17% education- edWeb.net 41% who are members of at least one Principals % of members that visit weekly or focused sites ASCD Edge 39% more frequently 53% report high 6% Classroom 2.0frequency of use 17% across all job 26% Edmodo functions 49% edWeb.net 5% 27% Teachers ASCD Edge 3% 22% Classroom 2.0 5% 21% Edmodo 31% 40% edWeb.net 31% Librarians/Media 56% Specialists ASCD Edge 3% 33% Classroom 2.0 16% 32% MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 20
    • 21. Separating Personal and Professional AccountsDo you use separate social networking accounts for yourpersonal vs. professional activities? 80% of educators who I use separate No, I dont keep them separate.are members of accounts some of 13% the time. at least one 7% social network keep separate I use separate accounts all or accounts most of the I use separate most of the time. accounts all of time 20% the time. 60% Very little difference by age, gender, or job title MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 80% 21
    • 22. The Value of Using Social Networks Please indicate the value in using social networks for the following purposes: Very Valuable Somewhat Valuable Not Valuable 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% To connect with family and friends 73% 23% 4% To share information and resources 55% 36% 10% To connect with professional colleagues 46% 45% 8% To build a personal learning network 40% 42% 18% To get support from peers 39% 48% 13% To create professional learning communities 39% 45% 16% For online professional development support 37% 46% 17% To collaborate on initiatives and projects 35% 48% 17% To connect with the local community 34% 51% 15%To learn how social networking and Web 2.0 tools… 34% 46% 20% To find information on products and services 33% 49% 18% To improve schoolwide communications 33% 41% 26% To become familiar with social networking 31% 49% 20% To find job and career opportunities 26% 47% 26% To connect with parents 24% 41% 35% To connect with students 18% 38% 44% MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 22
    • 23. The Value of Using Social Networks – By Job Function 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 71% To connect with family and friends 73% 71% 61% To share information and resources 50% 60% 51% To connect with professional colleagues 42% 47% 49% Principals To create professional learning communities 31% 46% Teachers 48% Librarians/ Media Specialists To build a personal learning network 30% 48% 47% To connect with the local community 27% 35% 43% % who said “very valuable” To improve schoolwide communications 29% 34% 43% For online professional development support 30% 43% 42% To collaborate on initiatives and projects 29% 39% 39% To get support from peers 34% 44% 35% To find information on products and services 33% 30% 34% To connect with parents 21% 23% To learn how social networking and Web 2.0 tools can be 34% 24% incorporated into teaching 45% 31% To find job and career opportunities 25% 27% 29% To become familiar with social networking 29% 34% 13% To connect with students 21% 14% MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 23
    • 24. The Value of Using Social Networks • Principals and librarians/media specialists had similar responses. Beyond friends They find social networks to be more valuable than do teachers and family… for several purposes, including: educators believe • Online professional development supportsocial networks are • Building a personal learning network • Creating professional learning communities good for sharing • Collaborating on initiatives and projects information and • Improving school-wide communicationsresources, connecti • Connecting with the local community ng with • Teachers also find social networks helpful for: colleagues, and • Sharing information and resources building a personal • Connect with professional colleagues learning network • Building a personal learning network • Teachers more interested in using social media to connect with students than principals and librarians/media specialists • Share concerns about the possibility of inappropriate relationships with students online that could jeopardize their jobs. MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 24
    • 25. Joining an Additional Social NetworkHow likely are you to join a new or additional social networking site in thenext 12 months? % who said they were very likely to join a new or additional social networking site in the next 12 months 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 4% A site for personal use 5% 10% Principals Teachers 22%A site dedicated to education for 26% Librarians/ Media use in the classroom 25% SpecialistsA professional social networking 31% site for professional 22% development, peer to peer collaboration, etc. 34% • Greatest opportunity is likely to be in educational and professional sites rather than sites for personal use for all three job categories. MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 25
    • 26. Concernsabout Social NetworkingPlease indicate any concerns you have about joining a social networking site. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 84% I am concerned about my personal privacy. 45% 67% I am already too busy and dont have time. 57% I already get too many emails and online 62% communications. 65% My school/district does not allow me to access many 50% of these sites. 33% I am concerned about mixing personal and 61% professional information and relationships. 34%I am concerned about inappropriate relationships with 56% students. 26% I am concerned my membership in a social network 42% might lead to an incident that might jeopardize my 26% job. General SN SitesI dont receive any job or career credit for participating 24% Educational SN Sites in online communities. 37% MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 26
    • 27. Top Concerns – General Sites vs. Educational Sites General Social Networks 100% Educational Networks Personal privacy - 84% 80% 70% Too busy/not enough time - 67%Too many emails and online communications - 62% 60% Too many emails and online communications - 65% Mixing personal & professional lives - 61% Inappropriate relationships with students - 56% 50% Too busy/not enough time - 57% Not allowed by school/district - 50% Personal privacy - 45% Might jeopardize job - 42% 40% Dont receive job or career credit for it - 37% 30% Mixing personal & professional lives - 34% Not allowed by school/district - 33% Inappropriate relationships with students - 26% 20% Might jeopardize job - 26% Dont receive job or career credit for it - 24% MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 27
    • 28. Proprietary Online CommunitiesAre you currently a member of any of the following online communitiesor platforms that focus on education? % that are members among those that selected at least one of the communities listed 0% 20% 40% 60% Discovery Education Network 52% BrainPOP Educators 30% Edutopia 29% PBS Teachers 27% Moodle 27% Blackboard 24% SMART Exchange 21% Scholastic Teacher Share 19% Thinkfinity 18% Teachers Pay Teachers 18% The communities listed above are those that received a 15% or greater mention from the survey respondents. MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 28
    • 29. Proprietary Online Communities Top 5 Communities by Job Function Rank Principals Teachers Librarians 1 Discovery Education Discovery Education Discovery Education Network – 25% Network – 37% Network – 49% 2 Edutopia – 25% BrainPOP Educators – 17% Edutopia – 31% 3 Moodle – 24% SMART Exchange – 19% PBS Teachers – 30% 4 Blackboard – 22% Moodle – 19% Thinkfinity – 25% 5 BrainPOP Educators – 17% Teachers Pay Teachers – 18% BrainPOP Educators – 24% Discovery Education Network and BrainPOP Educators are in the top 5 for all job categories MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 29
    • 30. Educators Use of Web 2.0 ToolsAre you currently using any of the following Web 2.0 tools for personaluse, professional use, or in the classroom? % use by those educators who indicated they are using Web 2.0 tools For PERSONAL use For PROFESSIONAL use For use IN THE CLASSROOM 0% 20% 40% 60% 44% Social Networks 22% 7% 18% Document Sharing 34% 15% 7% Webinars 48% 3% 33% Photo Sharing 9% 8% 8% Wikis 25% 9% 19% Video Sharing 11% 10% 12% Blogs 16% 9% 10% Podcasts 18% 8% 11% Social Bookmarking 10% 3% 8% RSS Feeds 12% 2% MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 30
    • 31. Respondents shared their perceptions of access to these toolsSchool/District Policies on Access to Web 2.0 ToolsPlease characterize your school/districts policy for access to Web 2.0 toolsfor both teachers and students. Very open Somewhat restrictive Very restrictive 47% of educators 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% say the policy foraccess to Web 2.0tools for students ...for teachers: 21% 56% 23% is very restrictive Only 9% say the policy for ...for students: 9% 44% 47% access is veryopen for students • Policies for teachers are less restrictive than policies for students. • Teachers view the policies as more restrictive than principals. • 18-34 year-old educators are less likely than their older peers to describe their school/districts policy for teachers as “very open.” MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 31
    • 32. Quality of Internet AccessHow good is the Internet service in your school/district? Excellent Good OK Poor 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Principals 38% 42% 18% 2% Teachers 25% 46% 24% 5% Librarians/Media Specialists 32% 45% 20% 4% • High percentage of educators rate their Internet service as either excellent or good, with less than 5% rating it as poor. MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 32
    • 33. Devices Used to Access Social NetworksWhat devices do you use to access the social networking sites you belong to?(Among those who indicated that they are currently a member of or have ever joined a social networking site.) Often Sometimes Rarely Never 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Desktop Computer 47% 24% 12% 17% Laptop Computer 60% 20% 9% 11% Smartphone 38% 18% 7% 37% Tablet Computer 30% 15% 8% 47% • Educators who are members of social networks report that they most often use a laptop computer to access their social networking sites, followed by their desktop computer. MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 33
    • 34. Devices Used to Access Social Networks – By Function Devices Used to Access S Networks – By Job Job Function What devices do you use to access the social networking sites you belong to? (Among those who indicated that they are currently a member of or have ever joined a social networking site.) Percent reporting they use the listed device “often.” 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Desktop Computer, 46% Laptop Computer, 55% Principals Smartphone, 52% Tablet Computer, 47% Desktop Computer, 40% Laptop Computer, 60% Teachers Smartphone, 37% Tablet Computer, 26% Desktop Computer, 60% Laptop Computer, 62%Librarians/ Media Specialists Smartphone, 30% Tablet Computer, 23% • Librarians report using desktop computers more often than principals and teachers. • Principals report using smartphones and tablets more often than teachers and librarians. • Laptops are used at similar rates (55-62% say “often”) among all three groups. • Principals appear to use all four device types roughly equally, while teachers use laptops more often than other devices, and librarians use desktops and laptops more than smart phones and tablets. MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 34
    • 35. Devices Used to Access Social Networks– By AgeWhat devices do you use to access the social networking sites you belong to?(Among those who indicated that they are currently a member of or have ever joined a social networking site.) Percent reporting they use the listed device “often.” 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Desktop Computer, 29% Laptop Computer, 65%18-34 yrs old Smartphone, 60% Tablet Computer, 35% Desktop Computer, 38% Laptop Computer, 65%35-44 yrs old Smartphone, 55% Tablet Computer, 42% Desktop Computer, 51% Laptop Computer, 56%45-54 yrs old Smartphone, 33% Tablet Computer, 29% Desktop Computer, 57% Laptop Computer, 61% 55+ yrs old Smartphone, 20% Tablet Computer, 20% • Older educators are more likely to use desktop computers, while younger educators are more likely to use smartphones and tablets. • Laptops are used at similar rates (56-65% say “often”) among all age groups. MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 35
    • 36. dDevices Used to Access Social Networks– By Metro StatusWhat devices do you use to access the social networking sites you belong to?(Among those who indicated that they are currently a member of or have ever joined a social networking site.) Percent reporting they use the listed device “often.” 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Desktop Computer, 43% Laptop Computer, 57% Rural Smartphone, 32% Tablet Computer, 30% Desktop Computer, 47% Laptop Computer, 62%Suburban Smartphone, 38% Tablet Computer, 32% Desktop Computer, 50% Laptop Computer, 62% Urban Smartphone, 50% Tablet Computer, 29% • Smartphone usage appears to be higher in urban communities than in rural or suburban. • Usage rates of the other devices appears to be similar across all three community types. MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 36
    • 37. Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) PoliciesDoes your district allow students to bring their own laptops tablets and/or mobilephones for use in the classroom? Yes, with no restrictions. 5% Its fairly evenly split between districts that do and dont allow No, they do not 54% students to bring allow it. Yes, but their use 46% their own is restricted. 49% mobile devicesfor classroom use • 54% allow students to bring devices, but 49% do so with restrictions. • There was no significant difference by district size or locale. MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 37
    • 38. Whats the BYOD policy?Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) PoliciesWhat is the likelihood that your district will allow students to bring their ownlaptops, tablets, and/or mobile phones? 64% of educators* indicate they are Very unlikely either somewhat or 19% Very likely very likely to move to 26% BYOD in the future 64% Somewhat unlikely 17% Somewhat likely 38% * Of those who said they currently don’t allow mobile devices or their current use is restricted. MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 38
    • 39. Educator Comments Concerns I think social networking sites can be beneficial, but Ive never known of any students and very few adults who use them appropriately. Big time-waster as an administrator dealing with social networking issues with students, parents, etc. — Principal Too many educators in my district are “friending” students, not “teaching” students. They are crossing the professional boundaries. — Teacher We are given no time and no help in incorporating social networking and Web 2.0 tools into our curricula. — Librarian/Media Specialist MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 39
    • 40. Educator Comments Advocates It is SO very important that we as teachers begin to use technology, as students are already “equipped” with the mindset for technology. Change has come and is changing even more. Students need education in the means that is pertinent to them and engaging as well. They love computers, smart phones, etc., and this is the 21st century, where letters and cards rarely exist. We must compete with other countries and therefore need to prepare our students for the 21st century. — Teacher I believe we need to teach our students the proper way to use these tools in school versus outside of school. By blocking all of these tools with a filter, we are not encouraging their growth personally, intellectually, or globally with other world citizens. I believe our school, and many in our country, are far behind on our Internet policies and using social media in education. — Librarian/Media Specialist MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 40
    • 41. Impact for Educators• Why Become a Connected Educator? – Many opportunities for free PD – Expand your personal learning network and network of colleagues – Find information and resources to improve teaching and learning• How to Get Started – Join Twitter and follow hashtags like #edchat #edtech #ce12 or follow associations you’re a member of, or leading educators. – Join an education-focused social networking website • edmodo is great for creating social networking communities with students • edWeb.net has PLCs on many topics for professional collaboration – Create a community of your own to connect with colleagues – Keep your personal and professional information separate• Participate in the US DOE Connected Educator Events – www.connectededucators.org MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 41
    • 42. Impact for the Education Industry• Use of Social Media Sites – Important to keep personal and professional messages separate – Use of education sites most likely to grow for all job categories• Product Development – Impact of BYOD and mobile devices – Complexity of designing for multiple platforms and applications• Marketing and Sales • Communication tool more than a targeted marketing tool • Must fit a business strategy, relevant content very important• Customer Engagement – Expanded opportunities for engagement with prospects and customers -- including students on a 24/7 basis – Impact on customer service and tech support MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 42
    • 43. Q&A Please post your comments and questions in the text chat window. MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 43
    • 44. Get Your Free Copy of the Report Download yourfreecopy Continue the conversation online by joining theConnectedEducatorsCommunityonedWe b.net www.mmseducation.comwww.edweb.net/CE www.edweb.net @edwebnet www.mchdata.com MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 44
    • 45. For More Information Contact us directly to learn more Susan Meell |CEO smeell@mmseducation.com 800-523-5948, ext. 3142 www.mmseducation.com Lisa Schmucki | Founder & CEO lisa@edweb.net 800-575-6015, ext. 100 www.edweb.net | @edwebnet John Hood | President JohnH@mchdata.com 800-776-6373 www.mchdata.com MMS Education | edWeb.net | MCH Strategic Data 45

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