Teacher the teacher engagement (week two)
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Teacher the teacher engagement (week two)

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In unit two, participants will create the framework for a rating scale on motivation with the idea that, ultimately, a workable Early Warning System that alerts faculty and staff of impending student ...

In unit two, participants will create the framework for a rating scale on motivation with the idea that, ultimately, a workable Early Warning System that alerts faculty and staff of impending student issues is published for use by the college.

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  • “This very real risk of losing our direction and failing to reach out desired destination should motivate us to be disciplined and deliberative when planning our action research, our planned exploration of a not-yet-visible destination (Sagor, 2011, p. 31).
  • It is important to remember the path we have traveled and where we still have to go. So far, we covered the concept of motivation and its’ impact on student persistence. Our training targets involve both performance targets and process targets. We are looking to improve postsecondary motivation, engagement, goal-setting, and achievement. The literature review conducted on postsecondary student attrition and early warning systems informed this project so that in the end an early warning system that detects dropout tendencies in applied into practice. Each week, I will engaged in the four stages of an action research process – “envisioning success, clarifying a theory, collecting data while implementing theory, and reflecting on results obtained” (Sagor, 2011, p. 61).
  • In unit one, project participants were introduced to the larger purpose of the overall project. The training targets were introduced and the concept of an Early Warning System is considered. The drivers of attrition of particular concern to this project were explained, of which, the first was reviewed – Motivation. In our sixty minute face-to-face discussion, we began the process of separating extrinsic motivation from intrinsic motivation. We also explored a text book definition of motivation. And, we talked about instrument goals as a means for driving motive. Lastly, learners were introduced to the online discussion platform and the case presentation that we will reference for the next nine weeks. The participants left the session with the following understanding: online discussions were to address Susan’s situation – anchoring comments to motivation.
  • The online discussion forum immediately opened once the on-ground session ended. The unit one topic dealt with motivation and asked: How can you tell if motivation exists with your students?
  • In unit one, the project participants were asked to examine a specific scenario whereby a student (Susan) was not performing to standards. According to the scenario, the student “…misses assignment deadlines and submits work late”. The project participants were asked two questions: (1) What strategies would you use to assess motivation and (2) How can you tell if motivation exists with your students. These questions were intended to prompt reflection and test strategies. Now it’s time to target motivation and develop a scale to rate learner motivation. The idea is to, in the end, create an early warning system to alert faculty and staff of impending issues that might support attrition. In unit two, participants used their online discussions to begin to consider creating a scale to judge motivation. Working in groups, the participants follow the instructions: only consider the“as expected” rating. What does this look like to you? What attributes would you expect to find in a learner who is meeting your expectation as far as motivation is concerned? Area’s 1-2 and 4-5 will be completed by the capstone author at the end of the project. The entire scale will be presented in the final project and Early Warning System.
  • At the conclusion of this unit, learners should be able to list at least one definition for student engagement. They should be able to weight the benefits of student engagement on persistence. And, they should be able to adjust their own responses and actions in the classroom to support student engagement.
  • According to Axelson and Flick (2011), the term student engagement “has come to refer to how involved or interested student’s appear to be in their learning and how connected they are to their classes, their institutions, and each other”. Three easy-to-accept descriptors of engagement, as offered by Axelson and Flick (2011) are ‘involved’, ‘interested’, and ‘connected’. This sets the stage of a host of questions, such as, how can I (as a teacher) create learning opportunities so that learners are INVOLVED, INTERESTED, and CONNECTED?
  • According to Hughes and Pace, the literature on student engagement indicates that “students who leave college prematurely were less engaged than their counterparts who persisted (as cited by Allen & Lester, 2012, p. 9). The premise being offered is that disengagement may be used to explain decision(s) to dropout of school. If this is true, the question becomes, how to engage learners so that dropout occurrences decrease?
  • Even more, according to Gilardi and Gulgielmetti, “Relationships play a crucial role in retention because they foster a stronger sense of [student] integration into the college (as cited by Allen & Lester, 2012, p. 9). The affective component to this finding indicates that students who are successful in managing their emotions and relationships and impulse control are more likely to persist to graduation. This would infer that engagement is an action or an activity that is directed by feelings or emotions. In other words, positive, pleasurable emotions work to inspire or ignite engagement and, conversely, negative, unpleasurable emotions would work to limit engagement. More importantly, studies show just how faculty and staff are successful in creating conditions that allow for engagement to occur. In their study, Allen and Lester (2012) demonstrate that improvement programs consisting of learning experiences (classroom) paired with hands-on support from a “Success Coach” positively altered student engagement (Allen & Lester, 2012). Sparkman et al, (2012) found that “emotional intelligence improves with training” (p. 650). This substantiates the idea that learners who lack emotional talents are open to being taught how to engage.
  • Allen and Lester (2012) demonstrate that improvement programs consisting of learning experiences (classroom) paired with hands-on support from a “Success Coach” positively altered student engagement (Allen & Lester, 2012). Sparkman et al, (2012) found that “emotional intelligence IMore importantly, studies show just how faculty and staff are successful in creating conditions that allow for engagement to occur. In their study, Allen and Lester (2012) demonstrate that improvement programs consisting of learning experiences (classroom) paired with hands-on support from a “Success Coach” positively altered student engagement (Allen & Lester, 2012). In their study on student engagement and persistence, Allen and Lester (2012) found that “the fundamental idea underlying engagement theory is that [a] student must be meaningfully engaged in learning activities through interaction with others and worthwhile tasks” (p. 9).

Teacher the teacher engagement (week two) Teacher the teacher engagement (week two) Presentation Transcript

  • TEACHER THE TEACHER Louis Cabuhat, Dean of Education Bryman College Student Engagement – Unit Two
  • “If you don‟t know where you are going, any road will get you there” - Richard S. Sagor Connecting Your Actions to the Target IMPROVED OUTCOMES
  • • Performance Targets (INDIVIDUAL OUTCOMES) • Ask yourself, “What are students expected to gain from our „actions”? • Improved motivation √ • Improved engagement • Realistic goal-setting • Improved achievement • Process Targets (TECHNIQUES or STRATEGIES) • Development of an Early Warning System Training Targets (Sagor, 2011)
  • • Unit One dealt with motivation • Motivation is driven by emotion • 60 minute face-to-face session (followed by) • Online discussion forum Recap
  • Discussion ReCap of Motivation Participants were asked; How can you tell if a student is motivated? These are some of the responses offered: …[the student has a] smile on face – Meryl Harlow …[the student is] active in the activities – Anthony Cervantes …[the student accepts that] communication is the KEY to success – Ms. Lee …student is on time and prepared - Alex Esparcia …[the student makes] time to study – Rosemary Bautista …[I turn to] attitudes, behavior and classroom performance with attendance and grades – Avic Magsaysay
  • Drafting a Scale: Motivation Worst NeedsImprovement Asexpected Above Expectations Best ` 1 2 3 4 5 Directions: Workingin your groups, take afew minutesto discusswhat an "asexpected" rating(on ascale of 1 - 5) lookslike. Remember to anchor your discussion to our dynamic case: Susan. For example, if Susan were to meet your expectationson motivation, what would that look like to you?Using thisworksheet, draft one word adjectivesor small sentencesto explain what a'motivated' Susan might look like. Think - Best case scenario! Rating Motivation
  • Unit Two – Student Engagement • Learners will be able to: List at least one definition of student engagement Weigh the benefits of student engagement on persistence Adjust teacher responses to support student engagement
  • Defining Student Engagement • Many Descriptors such as: • Involved • Interested • Connected • A professor at Oklahoma City University, in helping to shed light on the topic of engagement, suggests “…that engagement implies there is something more; that it means going beyond what can be seen in the classroom” (Garrett, 2011, p. 3).
  • ↓ Engagement = ↑ Dropout Rate • Ask yourself these questions: - Does a happy student involve themselves in learning? - Is a distracted student less interested in learning? - Is a disengaged student less likely to connect with you? If you answer „YES‟ to any of these questions, be aware!
  • The Influence of Emotions Students who are successful in managing their emotions and relationships and impulse control are more likely to persist to graduation • Involved • Interested • Connected If you are successful at assisting learners to manage their emotions, persistence is more likely. Teachers create activities that allow for engagement!
  • How do you lay the groundwork for engagement? • Engagement improvement programs do work! • Remember that a process of improvement is required – you lead the challenge! • You‟re not alone: • Introduce a “Success Coach” into your class • Seek assistance from student affairs • Rely on the benefits of peer-support circles
  • Reread Susan’s Case Susan is a new student who is attending classes at Bryman College – A for-profit organization. As a new enrollment to the school, Susan repeatedly misses assignment deadlines and submits work late. While in class, her instructor notices that Susan frequently avoids eye contact with others and she excludes herself from group discussions. Now, in her third week of a four week module, it doesn’t look good. Susan has failed her mid-term exam. And now, the teacher is concerned that some of Susan’s behavior is an early indication of what’s about to come – another drop for the college; another failed attempt. So, in an effort to address the problem, the teacher presents what she knows of Susan to colleagues at the college. And, to her surprise, several of the other staff members are dealing with a ‘Susan’ of their own. What’s even more unsettling – the College attrition rate for newly enrolled students is extremely high.
  • Return to EduOs.net to continue addressing Susan‟s case anchoring your ideas to ENGAGEMENT
  • Reference List Axelson, R. D., & Flick, A. (2011, January-February).Defining student engagement. Retrieved from http://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back Issues/2011/January-February 2011/student-engagement-abstract.html Allen, I. H., & Lester, S. M. (2012). The impact of a college survival skills course and a success coach on retention and academic performance. Journal of career and technical education, 27(1), 8-14. Retrieved from http://www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/EJ974495.pdf Garrett, C. (2011, November). Defining, detecting, and promoting student engagement in college learning environments. Retrieved from http://kwantlen.ca/TD/TD.5.2/TD.5.2.5.Garrett_Student_Engagement.pdf Sagor, R. (2011). The action research guidebook: a four-stage process for educators and school teams. (2 ed.). Thousand Oak, California: Corwin. Sparkman, L., Maulding, W. S., & Roberts, J. G. (2012). Non-cognitive predictors of student success in college. College student journal, 46(3), 642-652. Retrieved from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=efc82f3b-eac7-4d11-91da- acc4e88f76d0@sessionmgr15&vid=5&hid=12