Unit Five: Targeting Motivation by
Introducing Technology
Louis Cabuhat, Dean of Education
TEACHER
THE
TEACHER
Web 2.0 Tec...
“If you don’t know where you are
going, any road will get you there”
- Richard S. Sagor
Connecting Your Actions to the Tar...
 Performance Targets (INDIVIDUAL
OUTCOMES)
 Ask yourself, “What are students expected to
gain from our „actions”?
 Impr...
 Unit One dealt with
 Motivation is driven by emotion
According to Chickering (2006), “motivation is
the key to persiste...
 Unit three dealt with
“Learners who are unable to form
positive motivational “attitudes”
towards goal fulfillment are at...
Our
Evolving
Early
Warning
System
Worst NeedsImprovement Asexpected Above Expectations Best
` 1 2 3 4 5
Worst NeedsImprove...
Drafting a Scale: Achievement
Worst NeedsImprovement Asexpected AboveExpectations Best
1 2 3 4 5
Directions:
Workingin you...
Unit Five: Targeting Student Persistence
by Introducing Technology
Learners will be able to:
Discuss a connection between ...
This lesson is not about:
 What types of technology to use in
the classroom (of any sort)
 Why technology is so ubiquito...
This lesson is about:
 How to incorporate
technology to trigger intrinsic
motivation and enhance
engagement
Defining Motivation
(reminder from unit one)
“An internal state that arouses
learners, steers them in a particular
directi...
 Use descriptors such as:
 Involved
 Interested
 Connected
 A professor at Oklahoma City University, in
helping to sh...
Rationale Offered by the Literature
 Students who are more intrinsically motivated
perform better academically (Dev, 1997...
Rationale Offered by the Literature
 “Today almost any school in America,
however poor or remote, can possess the
equival...
Gestalt Theory of Learning
(in support of this lesson)
 “A person behaves in terms of what is
real to him or her and what...
This is Gestalt Psychology
Teach me!
(Isselee, n.d.)
Perspective is everything!
I am the
Worldwide
Web
(Isselee, n.d.)
Constructivism
 “…students are naturally
motivated to read and write; the
role of schooling is to provide
them with the t...
Why use images and video to
teach?
 “Studies going back as far as 1951 to show
that photos and films encourage learning,
...
What a great time to be a teacher!
Now it’s time to use the Internet and technology to explore ways to
motivate Susan. Fol...
Susan’s Case
Susan is a new student who is attending classes at Bryman College
– A for-profit organization. As a new enrol...
Return to EduOs.net and
introduce Susan to your
new piece of technology.
Reference List
Can you picture that?. (2012, August 17). Retrieved from
http://thejournal.com/Whitepapers/2012/08/Canon_Ca...
Reference List
Knowles, M., Holton, E., & Swanson, R. (2005). The adult learner: the definitive classic in adult education...
5 unit five teach the teacher_web 2.0 technology
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5 unit five teach the teacher_web 2.0 technology

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Digital media (technology) has very important implications for learning. Technology has, inarguably, become woven into everyday living. In fact, it is hard to imagine a world void of technology. The Internet (Worldwide Web) is a great example of just how access to information touches and shapes our lives. Social media is used for communication. Online video conferencing bridges gaps. And, Wi-Fi technology currently provides access to information like never seen before. The Unit Five weekly activity is intended to connect learning, personal motive and technology so that behaviors are shaped. The goal is to demonstrate just how digital media can be leveraged by an instructor in the classroom to reveal a connection between motivation and Slideshare.com for learning.

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  • “This very real risk of losing our direction and failing to reach out desired destination should motivate us to be disciplined and deliberative when planning our action research, our planned exploration of a not-yet-visible destination (Sagor, 2011, p. 31).
  • It is important to remember the path we have traveled and where we still have to go. So far, we covered the concept of motivation and its’ impact on student persistence. Our training targets involve both performance targets and process targets. We are looking to improve awareness on postsecondary motivation, engagement, goal-setting, and achievement so that in the end dropout tendencies are better understood. Even more, following each training session, the components of an early warning system is being created by the participants. The literature review conducted on postsecondary student attrition and early warning systems informed this project so that in the end an early warning system that detects dropout tendencies in applied into practice. Each week, I will engaged in the four stages of an action research process – “envisioning success, clarifying a theory, collecting data while implementing theory, and reflecting on results obtained” (Sagor, 2011, p. 61).
  • In unit one, project participants were introduced to the larger purpose of the overall project. The training targets were introduced and the concept of an Early Warning System is considered. The drivers of attrition of particular concern to this project were explained, of which, the first was reviewed – Motivation. In our sixty minute face-to-face discussion, we began the process of separating extrinsic motivation from intrinsic motivation. We also explored a text book definition of motivation. And, we talked about instrument goals as a means for driving motive. Lastly, learners were introduced to the online discussion platform and the case presentation that we will reference for the next nine weeks. In unit two, participants were introduced to concepts of student engagement. Following unit two, participants were expected to be able to list at least one definition of student engagement; weigh the benefits of student engagement on persistence; adjust their ‘teaching strategies’ to support engagement. Key words were introduced: involved, interested, and connected. Participants were introduced to the literature on engagement and they were told: decreased engagement translates into increased dropout rates. Finally, participants were directed to www.EduOs.net to address the online discussion questions related to student engagement.
  • Unit three dealt with goal-setting and the use of Futuring techniques. Following this unit, learners are expected to be able to diagram steps that may be used to set realistic goals (by students); define Futuring techniques; explain the benefits to Futuring as it relates to student persistence. Finally, participants were directed to www.EduOs.net to address the online discussion questions related to goal-setting and futuring.
  • Teach the Teacher is a nine week series of professional development designed to use known drivers of postsecondary attrition to develop an early warning system to detect student dropout tendencies. Using a literature review and personal past experiences to inform the process, an early warning system is beginning to be built by the training participants. Following the sessions on ‘motivation’, ‘engagement’, and ‘goal-setting’, participants were asked to consider what an “As Expected” rating might looking like to them (on a scale of 1 – 5). To-date, the participants have applied what they have learned to develop the first three scales (shown above) that will become part of the Early Warning System used by Bryman College.
  • In unit five, participants will reflect on their online discussions to begin creating a scale that rates student achievement. The participants are directed to avoid listing tangible metrics of attendance and grades when crafting responses for this scale. Working in groups, the participants will follow these instructions: Only consider the “as expected” rating. What does this look like to you? What attributes would you expect to find in a learner who is meeting your expectation as far as achievement is concerned? Participants are given 15 minutes to work on the scale. Area’s 1-2 and 4-5 will be completed by the capstone author at the end of the project. The entire scale will be presented in the final project and Early Warning System.
  • This slide is provided as a reference to the Unit One content on motivation. Motivation may be defined as “an internal state that arouses learners, steers them in a particular direction and keeps them engaged with certain activities” (Lei, 2010, p. 153). Another way to view motivation is in terms of ‘drive’. This specific approach to understanding motivation is categorized in terms of external drive versus internal drive (extrinsic versus intrinsic, respectively). Current data suggests that anything that interferes with one or both of these drives impacts learner persistence (Balduf, 2009; Laskey & Hetzel, 2010; Miller & Tanner, 2011; Morrow & Ackermann, 2012, Tinto, 1987). For example, Balduf (2009) found (within the context of their research) many students were not ready for the challenges encountered in college and thus lacked intrinsic motivation to succeed. This resulted in the incongruence between personally held beliefs and the reality of challenging college-level work.
  • This slide is provided as a reference to the Unit Two content on engagement. According to Axelson and Flick (2011), the term student engagement “has come to refer to how involved or interested student’s appear to be in their learning and how connected they are to their classes, their institutions, and each other”. Three easy-to-accept descriptors of engagement, as offered by Axelson and Flick (2011) are ‘involved’, ‘interested’, and ‘connected’. This sets the stage of a host of questions, such as, how can I (as a teacher) create learning opportunities so that learners are INVOLVED, INTERESTED, and CONNECTED?
  • 5 unit five teach the teacher_web 2.0 technology

    1. 1. Unit Five: Targeting Motivation by Introducing Technology Louis Cabuhat, Dean of Education TEACHER THE TEACHER Web 2.0 Technology
    2. 2. “If you don’t know where you are going, any road will get you there” - Richard S. Sagor Connecting Your Actions to the Target IMPROVED OUTCOMES
    3. 3.  Performance Targets (INDIVIDUAL OUTCOMES)  Ask yourself, “What are students expected to gain from our „actions”?  Improved motivation √  Improved engagement √  Realistic goal-setting √  Improved achievement √  Process Targets (TECHNIQUES or STRATEGIES)  Development of an Early Warning System Training Targets (Sagor, 2011)
    4. 4.  Unit One dealt with  Motivation is driven by emotion According to Chickering (2006), “motivation is the key to persistence, moving through successfully, and learning that lasts” (p. 13).  Unit two dealt with Learners who are Involved, Interested and Connected are more likely to persist. Recap: the path already taken
    5. 5.  Unit three dealt with “Learners who are unable to form positive motivational “attitudes” towards goal fulfillment are at greater risk of dropping from program” Recap (Morrow & Ackermann, 2012)
    6. 6. Our Evolving Early Warning System Worst NeedsImprovement Asexpected Above Expectations Best ` 1 2 3 4 5 Worst NeedsImprovement Asexpected Above Expectations Best ` 1 2 3 4 5 Worst NeedsImprovement Asexpected Above Expectations Best ` 1 2 3 4 5 Rating Goal-setting Arrivesto classearly/staysafter classfor additional help Completesassignmentson-time (or early) Worksto improve grades Exchangescontact information with others Rating Motivation Punctual Bringsbooks/suppliesto class each day Maintainseye contact Assistsothersto learn Asksfor help (asneeded) - Submitsassignmentson-time Acceptscriticism Rating Engagement Participatesin group activities Interactswith classmates Isateamplayer Demonstratesapositive demenor Asksquestions
    7. 7. Drafting a Scale: Achievement Worst NeedsImprovement Asexpected AboveExpectations Best 1 2 3 4 5 Directions: Workingin your groups, take afew minutesto discusswhat an "asexpected" rating(on ascale of 1 - 5) lookslike. Remember to anchor your discussion to our dynamic case: Susan. For example, if Susan were to meet your expectationson achievement what would that look like to you?Usingthisworksheet, draft one word adjectivesor small sentencesto explain what it might look like (to you) if Susan were to set realistic goals. Think - Best case scenario! Rating Achievement
    8. 8. Unit Five: Targeting Student Persistence by Introducing Technology Learners will be able to: Discuss a connection between motivation and technology List a least one reason technology supports learning Explain Constructivism and its’ connection to technology Identify at least one method for using the Internet to improve motivation
    9. 9. This lesson is not about:  What types of technology to use in the classroom (of any sort)  Why technology is so ubiquitous
    10. 10. This lesson is about:  How to incorporate technology to trigger intrinsic motivation and enhance engagement
    11. 11. Defining Motivation (reminder from unit one) “An internal state that arouses learners, steers them in a particular direction and keeps them engaged with certain activities” (Lei, 2010, p. 153). 1. Horse to water 2. Fly to honey 3. Human to affection
    12. 12.  Use descriptors such as:  Involved  Interested  Connected  A professor at Oklahoma City University, in helping to shed light on the topic of engagement, suggests “…that engagement implies there is something more; that it means going beyond what can be seen in the classroom” (Garrett, 2011, p. 3). Defining Engagement (reminder from unit two)
    13. 13. Rationale Offered by the Literature  Students who are more intrinsically motivated perform better academically (Dev, 1997).  “Five key ingredients impacting student motivation are: student, teacher, content, method/process, and environment” (Williams, Williams, 2011).  “Learning is a process of discovering one’s personal connection to and with people, things and ideas” (Knowles, Holton & Swanson, 2005, p. 30).
    14. 14. Rationale Offered by the Literature  “Today almost any school in America, however poor or remote, can possess the equivalent of the greatest library in the history of the world, simply by virtue of the Internet” (Nelson, 2010).  “Technology enables students to accomplish more than they could without the use of technology” (Heafner, 2004, p. 48).
    15. 15. Gestalt Theory of Learning (in support of this lesson)  “A person behaves in terms of what is real to him or her and what is related to his or herself at the moment of action” (Knowles, et al, 2005, p. 30). (Knowles, Holton & Swanson, 2009, p. 29).
    16. 16. This is Gestalt Psychology Teach me! (Isselee, n.d.)
    17. 17. Perspective is everything! I am the Worldwide Web (Isselee, n.d.)
    18. 18. Constructivism  “…students are naturally motivated to read and write; the role of schooling is to provide them with the tools and guidance they need to acquire learning skills in a developmentally appropriate, individually meaningful way” (Weigel, Gardner, 2009, p. 39).
    19. 19. Why use images and video to teach?  “Studies going back as far as 1951 to show that photos and films encourage learning, stimulate other learning activities, and facilitate thinking and problem solving” (Can you picture, 2012)
    20. 20. What a great time to be a teacher! Now it’s time to use the Internet and technology to explore ways to motivate Susan. Follow these instructions: 1) Visit Slideshare.com 2) Create a free user account using your college E mail address 3) Then, using Power Point, create three slides. 1) Slide One: create a title slide: Motivating Susan 2) Slide Two: list your rational for targeting motivation. HINT: You may want to revisit units we’ve already covered for suggestions 3) Slide Three: recommend at least one strategy for using technology to teach any of your current class topics. BE CREATIVE and remember we are dealing with Susan~! 4) Last and most important; UPLOAD your Power Point file to Slide share and E mail everyone in this class the link 
    21. 21. Susan’s Case Susan is a new student who is attending classes at Bryman College – A for-profit organization. As a new enrollment to the school, Susan repeatedly misses assignment deadlines and submits work late. While in class, her instructor notices that Susan frequently avoids eye contact with others and she excludes herself from group discussions. Now, in her third week of a four week module, it doesn‟t look good. Susan has failed her mid-term exam. And now, the teacher is concerned that some of Susan‟s behavior is an early indication of what‟s about to come – another drop for the college; another failed attempt. So, in an effort to address the problem, the teacher presents what she knows of Susan to colleagues at the college. And, to her surprise, several of the other staff members are dealing with a „Susan‟ of their own. What‟s even more unsettling – the College attrition rate for newly enrolled students is extremely high.
    22. 22. Return to EduOs.net and introduce Susan to your new piece of technology.
    23. 23. Reference List Can you picture that?. (2012, August 17). Retrieved from http://thejournal.com/Whitepapers/2012/08/Canon_Can-You-Picture-That/Asset.aspx Dev, P. (1997, January 1). Intrinsic motivation and academic achievment . Retrieved from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=9cd410a9-6828-49dd-959a- edcdb8d5cda4@sessionmgr104&vid=5&hid=112 Heafner, T. (2004). Using technology to motivate students to learn social studies. Retrieved from http://editlib.org/d/21905 Isselee, E. (n.d.). Why small pups outlive large dog breeds. Retrieved from http://www.livescience.com/27676-why-small-pups-outlive-large-dogs.html
    24. 24. Reference List Knowles, M., Holton, E., & Swanson, R. (2005). The adult learner: the definitive classic in adult education and human resource development. (6th ed.). Burlington, MA: Elsevier. Nelson, A. (2010, September 22). The challenge of digital media in the classroom. Retrieved from http://www.pbs.org/mediashift/2010/09/the-challenge-of-digital-media-in-the-classroom265.html Sagor, R. (2011). The action research guidebook: a four-stage process for educators and school teams. (2 ed.). Thousand Oak, California: Corwin. Weigel, M., & Gardner, H. (2009, March 1). The best of both. Retrieved from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=e64e9f67-8443-4a36-b86a- 414aa5f0ae34@sessionmgr114&vid=5&hid=108 Williams, K., & Williams, C. (2011). Five key ingredients for improving student motivation . Research in higher education journal, Retrieved from http://www.aabri.com/manuscripts/11834.pdf

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