Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Everyday  Electricity
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Everyday Electricity

560
views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology, Business

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
560
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Everyday Electricity February 26th, 2009
  • 2. Conductors in Electrostatic Equilibrium
    • Electrostatic equilibrium
      • When no net motion of charge is occurring within a conductor
        • Electrical field is 0 everywhere inside conductor
        • Any excess charge resides entirely on the conductors outer surface
        • Electrical field just outside a charge conductor is perpendicular to the conductor’s surface
        • Charge tends to accumulate where the radius of curvature of the surface is smallest (sharp points)
  • 3. Why does it matter?
    • When a conductor is in electrostatic equilibrium charge will collect at the sharpest points
    • When enough
    • charge accumulates
    • it will suddenly
    • discharge
  • 4. Van de Graaff Generator
    • The top of the generator
    • is a sphere so that large
    • amounts of charge can
    • build up without discharging
    • (they would discharge if
    • there was a point on top)
  • 5. Static Electricity & Lightning
    • Lightning occurs because of a polarization of the storm clouds
    • The bottom of the cloud
    • develops an excess of
    • Negative charge
    • A positive charge is
    • then induced on the surface
    • of the earth
  • 6.
    • As the static buildup during the storm becomes stronger the electrical fields around the cloud become strong enough to ionize the air, making it able to conduct electricity (becomes a conductive plasma)
    • A lightning bolt begins when a step leader of excess electrons begin to move towards the ground.
    • These electrons push away even more electrons from the Earth’s surface causing more positive charge to build up
  • 7.
    • The built-up positive charge can begin to migrate upward forming a streamer.
    • When the streamer and step leader meet a complete path is formed and lightning can strike!
  • 8. Lightning Rods
    • Lightning rods are often attached to the tops of tall buildings
    • The rod is made of metal and then attached to a wire that is buried deep in the ground
    • This gives the lightning an easy path to the ground and it will avoid going through the building
  • 9.  
  • 10.  
  • 11. The Leyden Jar
    • Earliest form of a battery
    • Charged by static electricity
    • Leyden Jar Demonstration

×