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Cleaning Up the Learning Environment: SOAPS, Learning Outcomes and Assessment
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Cleaning Up the Learning Environment: SOAPS, Learning Outcomes and Assessment

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Fresno State's Student Outcomes Assessment Program, SOAPS and deciding how to create, revise and match learning outcomes to SOAPS and assignments to learning outcomes for Summer Teaching Innovation …

Fresno State's Student Outcomes Assessment Program, SOAPS and deciding how to create, revise and match learning outcomes to SOAPS and assignments to learning outcomes for Summer Teaching Innovation Academy.

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  • Authenticity
  • I’ll separate into several slides-this is too much on one slide
  • I’ll separate into several slides-this is too much on one slide
  • I’ll separate into several slides-this is too much on one slide
  • I’ll separate into several slides-this is too much on one slide
  • Example of activities done without associated outcomes – writing in my majors pest management course Example of Outcomes without associated activities – design a monitoring plan
  • Transcript

    • 1. CLEANING UP THE LEARNINGENVIRONMENT: SOAPS,GOALS, AND LEARNINGOUTCOMES Summer Innovations Academy June 2012 by Ida M. JonesVerna Mae & Wayne D. Brooks Professor of Business Law Director, CSALT
    • 2. Session Learning Outcomes• Identify your department SOAP and summarize the relationship of your course to your department and/or program• Identify your course goals• Create or revise one learning outcome and apply Bloom’s Taxonomy• Create or match an assignment to the learning outcome Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 3. Find Your Syllabus Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 4. How does your course relate to the department and/or program? FIND YOUR SOAPHint: Use your laptop, access the internet and use Google Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 5. Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation tSyllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used withpermission.
    • 6. What are your course goals? Ask yourself:What do I want students to achieve in this course? Workplace/professional Educated, informed citizen PersonalIn other words, why do students need this course? Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 7. Write your Course Goals Think-Pair-Share (5-7 minutes) Concept Modify Think Share PairSome slides copied or adapted from A Lawsonpresentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 8. Debrief/Discuss Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 9. Writing Appropriate Learning Outcomes This next step is to write learning outcomes. This defines the type anddepth of learning students are expected to achieve. Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 10. Learning Outcomes are “do-able”•Describe what students should be able to do when they complete the course. Writing and Using Learning Outcomes: a Practical Guide, Kennedy, Hyland, Ryan (2006) Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 11. Learning outcomes are specific•Competency-based and measurable, in that they describe exactly what the student must do to demonstrate mastery of course material. Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 12. Learning outcomes are based on knowledge, skills and/or values• Outcomes may be separated by knowledge, skills and values (attitudes) Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 13. Learning outcomes are manageable• Should be an appropriate number of outcomes (5-12) and should be written at appropriate level Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 14. Learning Outcomes use appropriate level language •Use specific language (Bloom’s)Bloom, B.S. (1975) Taxonomy of Some slides copied or adapted from A LawsonEducational Objectives, Book 1 presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference,Cognitive Domain. Longman CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used withPublishing. permission.
    • 15. BLOOM’S TAXONOMY • Remembering: can the student recall or remember the information? define, duplicate, list, memorize, recall, repeat, reproduce state • Understanding: can the student explain ideas or concepts? classify, describe, discuss, explain, identify, locate, recognize, report, select, translate, paraphrase • Applying: can the student use the information in a new way? choose, demonstrate, dramatize, employ, illustrate, interpret, operate, schedule, sketch, solve, use, write• Analyzing: can the student distinguish between the different parts? appraise, compare, contrast, criticize, differentiate, discriminate, distinguish, examine, experiment, question, test• Evaluating: can the student justify a stand or decision? appraise, argue, defend, judge, select, support, value, evaluate• Creating: can the student create new product or point of view? assemble, construct, create, design, develop, formulate, writeChoose outcomes verbs that relate to the appropriate cognitive domain Source: http://www.odu.edu/educ/roverbau/Bloom/blooms_taxonomy.htm
    • 16. Write/Revise/Review Course Learning Outcomes Think-Pair-Share (5-7 minutes) Concept Modify Think Share PairSome slides copied or adapted from A Lawsonpresentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 17. Communicate outcomes• Your syllabus and assignments should communicate the linkage between assignments and learning outcomes Students should know why they are doing particular assignments Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 18. Aren’t grades enough?• Grades may be imprecise and idiosyncratic.• Class grades may be affected by (appropriate) factors such as attendance, class participation, late assignments.• Grades provide very minimal feedback about specific aspects of student performance.• Grades do have a place in assessment when they are based on specific, direct evidence of student learning outcomes and linked to standards ( e.g. rubrics). Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 19. Review Activities and Bloom’s Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 20. Questions to ask about your assessment activities:• Alignment of outcome verb with assessment instrument? (what kind of learning are you measuring)• How authentic is the task? (Where students are asked to perform real- world tasks that demonstrate meaningful application of essential knowledge and skills) Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 21. Assignments that address multiple outcomes:• Eg – midterm - Consider “bundling” groups of questions that address a particular outcome• Eg – paper, presentation or project– a rubric can be structured to give a subscore(s) that relates to a particular outcome(s) or sub-outcome Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 22. Activity: Take your learning outcomes and identify activities that accomplish those Course Learning Activities and AssignmentsCourse LearningOutcomes Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 23. Examining the matrix:• Activities done without associated outcomes?• Outcomes without associated activities?• How does the weighting of grades align? Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 24. Final Step: Close the loop!• Remember – the goal of outcomes assessment is to advance student learning through improved curricula and instruction • Use data on student performance an particular outcomes to drive what you do in your course. Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 25. Session Learning Outcomes- Accomplished?• Identify your department SOAP and summarize the relationship of your course to your department and/or program• Identify your course goals• Create or revise one learning outcome and apply Bloom’s Taxonomy• Create or match an assignment to the learning outcome Some slides copied or adapted from A Lawson presentation t Syllabus Redesign Conference, CSU Fresno Aug 12, 2010. Used with permission.
    • 26. BREAK TIME!Images from membership in classroomclipart.com