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Developing and Teaching Online/Distance Learning Courses

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Presentation to 2010 ALSB Conference

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Developing and Teaching Online/Distance Learning Courses

  1. 1. Developing & Teaching Distance Learning/On-Line Courses ALSB 2010 ANNUAL CONFERENCE, RICHMOND, VA Lori Harris-Ransom , Caldwell College Ida Jones , California State University-Fresno Linda Christiansen , Indiana University Southeast David Schein , University of Maryland This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA.
  2. 2. WHAT IS EDUCATION? <ul><li>AND WHAT IS THE TREND IN ONLINE EDUCATION? </li></ul>
  3. 3. WHAT IS QUALITY EDUCATION? Creating a learning environment where individuals with a variety of skills can increase knowledge, skills and the abilities to adapt to changing environments so that they can act as informed citizens of the world.
  4. 4. DEVELOPING AND TEACHING DISTANCE LEARNING Online Learning-A Short Story
  5. 5. HYBRID/BLENDED <ul><li>Part Online/Part Face-to-Face </li></ul><ul><li>Separate based on Pedagogy </li></ul><ul><li>Course Structure </li></ul><ul><li>Reflection and Student Feedback </li></ul>
  6. 6. USING TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION <ul><ul><li>Technology = Tools to foster learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Uses range from posting course materials, administering exams, linking to library and web resources, encouraging collaborative learning, encouraging critical thinking, virtual reality 3D environments (MUVE) </li></ul></ul>Document storage Immersive environments such as Second Life Educational Uses of Second Life
  7. 7. EDUCATIONAL MALPRACTICE??? CHE, Jeffrey Young 7/24/10 http://chronicle.com/article/Reaching-the-Last-Technology/123659/?sid=pm&utm_source=pm&utm_medium=en
  8. 8. PROFESSORS’ USE OF TECH IN THE CLASSROOM http://chronicle.com/article/Professors-Use-of/123682 CHE 7/25/10
  9. 9. DISTANCE LEARNING TRENDS <ul><li>Student Profiles and Enrollment </li></ul><ul><li>Faculty </li></ul><ul><li>Academic </li></ul><ul><li>Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Economic </li></ul><ul><li>Distance Learning </li></ul>Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration, Volume VI, NumberI I I, Fall2003 State University of West Georgia, Distance Education Center Scott L. Howell, PhD Brigham Young University [email_address] Peter B. Williams, M.S. Brigham Young University [email_address] Nathan K. Lindsay, M.S. University of Michigan [email_address] http://www.westga.edu/~distance/ojdla/fall63/howell63.htm l
  10. 10. HYBRID IF GOD CAN DO IT . . . <ul><li>Seminary To Take Theology Courses Online </li></ul>
  11. 11. PROLIFIC USE <ul><li>HARVARD AND COLUMBIA MBA PROGRAMS </li></ul><ul><li>ADVERTISING AND SOCIAL MEDIA, MARKETING AND SOCIAL MEDIA….WHY NOT LAW AND SOCIAL MEDIA </li></ul><ul><li>DIGITAL NATIVES </li></ul>
  12. 12. WHAT ARE MINUSES AND PLUSSES OF ONLINE EDUCATION?
  13. 13. OBJECTIONS TO ONLINE EDUCATION
  14. 14. EFFECTIVENESS OF ONLINE EDUCATION
  15. 15. CREATING ASSIGNMENTS <ul><li>BEST PRACTICES </li></ul>Designing Effective Online Assignments By Todd Gilman, CHE March 22, 2010 http://chronicle.com/article/Designing-Effective-Online/64772/
  16. 16. THREADED DISCUSSIONS <ul><li>Structure </li></ul><ul><li>Current Events and/or Questions </li></ul><ul><li>Typical Progress over time </li></ul><ul><li>Grading & Feedback </li></ul>
  17. 17. PRACTICAL ISSUES <ul><li>To create an online classroom that provides something like the in-classroom experience, class participation is important. </li></ul><ul><li>Question: How do you encourage students to participate in the online classroom? </li></ul><ul><li>Question: How does this differ from encouraging students to participate in the traditional classroom? </li></ul>
  18. 18. CLASS PARTICIPATION <ul><li>One Approach: Participation = 10% of Final Grade </li></ul><ul><li>Students will receive a participation grade for each half of the course equal to 5% of their final grade. </li></ul><ul><li>Rubric for evaluation of class participation. The focus is on meaningful participation and not just adding entries to the Conferences section. </li></ul><ul><li>Frequency - Theoretically possible to enter the online classroom once a week and receive a decent grade. The reality is that frequent participation each week puts the student in a much better position to make timely and meaningful contributions. </li></ul><ul><li>Benchmark is that eight meaningful posts to the classroom each week would be an A, six meaningful posts would be a B, and four would be a C. </li></ul><ul><li>Note that simply posting a short “me too” comment is not considered a “meaningful” post and will not support a strong grade for the week. </li></ul>&quot;Clip art licensed from the Clip Art Gallery on DiscoverySchool.com&quot;
  19. 19. CLASS PARTICIPATION GRADING <ul><li>Sample Grading Rubric: </li></ul><ul><li>Weekly participation grade is worth a maximum of 30 points. </li></ul><ul><li>27-30 pts - A – At least 2 comments needed * student provides thorough details of relevant facts * comments demonstrate a comprehensive analysis and/or interpretation of the case/issue * student supports his/her opinion by citing relevant, scholarly sources * student adds some new thought or point of view to the discussion or critiques another’s point of view. </li></ul>
  20. 20. CLASS PARTICIPATION GRADING, CONT. <ul><li>24-26 pts - B– At least 2 comments needed; one or more of the following may apply: * student provides a response with a limited number of facts * student does not clearly state the issue * student provides an adequate but not comprehensive analysis of the case/issue * student has a partial understanding of the concepts in the case * student sometimes, but not always, supports key statements with relevant, scholarly sources </li></ul><ul><li>21-23 pts - C– At least 2 comments needed; one or more of the following may apply: * student's comments do not reflect a comprehensive reading of the case/issue. * student describes only minimal components of the case/issue * student's analysis is not clear and coherent * analysis is only vaguely supported by scholarly material from the text or elsewhere * student merely restates what is in text instead of interpreting the material </li></ul>Another Sample Rubric
  21. 21. GROUP PROJECTS ONLINE <ul><li>Considerations: </li></ul><ul><li>Should you try group projects at all? </li></ul><ul><li>Assembling the Group – Random, system, or students choose? </li></ul><ul><li>Best approach to grading? </li></ul><ul><li>Input sheet from each group member to avoid slackers or dominant students? </li></ul><ul><li>Faculty input to groups? </li></ul>
  22. 22. FACULTY INPUT <ul><li>Faculty can insert comments for all students to see in the online classroom: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pros? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cons? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Email through the course site if possible </li></ul><ul><li>Email through traditional email </li></ul>
  23. 23. FACULTY INPUT CONT. <ul><li>Telephone discussions with students for remote faculty or remote students. </li></ul><ul><li>Question: In the pure online classroom, should there ever be the need for phone contact with students? </li></ul><ul><li>On-campus meetings with students who are in the vicinity of campus </li></ul>
  24. 24. WHAT ARE TOOLS? <ul><li>AND WHAT CAN ONLINE COURSES LOOK LIKE? </li></ul>
  25. 25. APPLICATIONS
  26. 26. APPLICATIONS (Pun Intended  ) <ul><li>Purdue University </li></ul><ul><li>http://campustechnology.com/articles/2010/07/21/the-technology-that-saved-a-university-degree-program.aspx </li></ul><ul><li>NYIT </li></ul><ul><li>http://campustechnology.com/articles/2010/02/17/getting-face-to-face-with-distance-learning.aspx </li></ul><ul><li>Videoconferencing </li></ul>
  27. 28. APPLICATIONS
  28. 29. APPLICATIONS <ul><li>Twitter in the MBA Classroom: </li></ul><ul><li>A Recipe For Success </li></ul><ul><li>Pat LeMay Burr, Ph.D., Distinguished </li></ul><ul><li>Chair-International Business, </li></ul><ul><li> burr@uiwtx.edu </li></ul><ul><li>Annette E. Craven, Ph.D., Associate </li></ul><ul><li>Professor-Management; </li></ul><ul><li> craven@uiwtx.edu </li></ul><ul><li>University of the Incarnate Word, San Antonio, TX </li></ul>ACBSP 2010 Annual Edition, Recognizing Excellence in Business Education, vol 1,
  29. 30. APPLICATIONS <ul><li>BLOGGING (Ida’s Blog) </li></ul><ul><li>PODCASTING </li></ul>
  30. 31. APPLICATIONS <ul><li>SOCIAL NETWORKS </li></ul><ul><li>Facebook, MySpace, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>YouTube </li></ul>
  31. 32. MY BLACKBOARD COURSE
  32. 33. HOW MILLENNIAL R U?
  33. 34. USING WEB 2.0 TO EXPLAIN WEB 2.0 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nsa5ZTRJQ5w
  34. 35. RESOURCES <ul><li>CAMPUS TECH RESOURCES </li></ul><ul><li>http://campustechnology.com/home.aspx </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. DEPT OF ED – Evidence-Based Practices in Online Learning </li></ul><ul><li>PROFHACKER </li></ul><ul><li>http://chronicle.com/blog/ProfHacker/27/ </li></ul><ul><li>EDUCAUSE http://www.educause.edu/ </li></ul>

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