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Burnaby head teachers.engagement.nov. 2010

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a 3 hour session with K-7 head teachers on engagement

a 3 hour session with K-7 head teachers on engagement

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Burnaby head teachers.engagement.nov. 2010 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Engaging Students/Engaging Teachers Burnaby  Head  Teachers   Faye  Brownlie     November  23rd,  2011   www.slideshare.net  
  • 2. Engagement•  Schlechty:    high  aBenCon  and  commitment  –   task  or  acCvity  has  inherent  meaning  or  value   to  the  student  •  Stuart  Shanker  –  self-­‐regulaCon;  calmly   focused  and  alert  •  Brownlie  and  Schnellert  –  voice  and  choice  
  • 3. Highly Engaged ClassSource:  Schlechty  Center  for  Leadership  in  School  Reform.  (2006).  Accessed  online  at  h"p://media.wiley.com/product_data/excerpt/55/07879616/0787961655.pdf.    Accessed  November,  2010.  
  • 4. Design  of  Engaging  Work   Clear  Goals          Product     No  Fault   &  Criteria                Focus   Prac3ce   Clear  Goals          Product     No  Fault   &  Criteria                Focus   Prac3ce   Relevant   Organiza3on  of   Relevant    Content   Authen3city   Organiza3on  of   Knowledge    Content   Authen3city   Knowledge   Novelty  &  Variety   Choice   Affilia3on/Affirma3on  Novelty  &  Variety   Choice   Affilia3on/Affirma3on  
  • 5. Stuart Shanker: stages of arousalInhibiCon    asleep    drowsy    hypoalert    calmly  focused  and  alert  ***    hyperalert    flooded  AcCvaCon  
  • 6. FrameworksIt’s All About Thinking – Brownlie & Schnellert, 2009
  • 7. Universal Design for LearningMulCple  means:  -­‐to  tap  into  background  knowledge,  to  acCvate   prior  knowledge,  to  increase  engagement  and   moCvaCon  -­‐to  acquire  the  informaCon  and  knowledge  to   process  new  ideas  and  informaCon  -­‐to  express  what  they  know.                        Rose  &  Meyer,  2002  
  • 8.  Open-ended Multiple teaching intelligences Inquiry learning Workshop Differentiation Literature and information circles
  • 9. Backwards Design•  What  important  ideas  and  enduring   understandings  do  you  want  the  students  to   know?  •  What  thinking  strategies  will  students  need  to   demonstrate  these  understandings?                      McTighe  &  Wiggins,  2001  
  • 10. Assessment for LearningPurpose   Guide  learning,  inform  instrucCon  Audience     Teachers  and  students  Timing     On-­‐going,  minute  by  minute,  day  by  day  Form     DescripCve  Feedback   ¶what’s  working?   •what’s  not?   •what’s  next?  Black  &  Wiliam,  1998   Hace  &  Timperley,  2007  
  • 11. Assessment for Learning•  Learning  intenCons  •  Criteria  •  DescripCve  feedback  •  QuesConing  •  Peer  and  self  assessment  •  Ownership  
  • 12. Goal:    Learning  IntenCons,  self  assessment   Kate  Giffin,  Queen  Alexandra,  gr.  4/5  Learning   Quiz   Mastery   Prac3ce  on   Assistance   Where  I  get  Inten3on   my  own   please!   stuck…  I  can  create  equivalent  fracCons.  I  can  reduce  a  fracCon  to  its  lowest  terms.  
  • 13. QuesConing  •  Math  •  Closed  vs  open  
  • 14. •  1  +  4  =    •  2  +  3  =  •  4  +  1  =  •  0  +  5  =  
  • 15. How can you show yournumber for our number book?
  • 16. Reading  and  Thinking  with  Different   Texts  •  Making  Inferences  •  Asking  quesCons  •  Using  evidence  to  support  your  thinking  •  Learning  IntenCons:            -­‐I  can  use  world  currency  informaCon  to   explain  what  this  means  to  average  people.        -­‐I  can  interpret  this  informaCon,  providing   reasoning  for  my  interpretaCons  
  • 17. A  Comparison  of  World  Currencies  –   what  does  it  mean  to  the  average   ciCzen?  •  CiCes  being  compared:   –  Athens,  Frankfurt,  Manila,  Shanghai,  Toronto  •  Number  of  minutes  to  work  to  buy  a  Big  Mac:    -­‐12,  15,  30,  30,  88  •  Number  of  hours  to  work  to  buy  an  8gb  iPod    -­‐10.5,  13.5,  24.5,  56.5,  128.5  
  • 18. •  Annual  average  hours  worked:    -­‐1704,  1827,  1868,  1946,  2032  •  Cost  of  living  (relaCve  to  NYC)    -­‐28.7%,  48.9%,  54.6%,  63%,  70.6%  ar?cles.moneycentral.msn.com/SmartSpending/ ConsumerAc?onGuide/burgernomics-­‐whats-­‐a-­‐big-­‐ mac-­‐worth.aspx  
  • 19. …the  process  through  which  meaningful  and  reflecCve  dialogue  arises.    Its  first  priority  is  to  serve  the  purpose  of  promoCng  learning  –  child,  teacher,  paraprofessional,  principal,  vice-­‐principal,  parent.   22  
  • 20. Assessment for Learning/ Supervision for LearningAssessment  for  Learning   Supervision  for  Learning  Learning  IntenCons   Learning  IntenCons  Criteria   Criteria  QuesConing   Culture  of  Inquiry  DescripCve  Feedback   DescripCve  Feedback  Self  and  Peer  Assessment   Self  ReflecCon  and  Learning  Partnerships  Ownership   Teacher  Ownership  
  • 21. Meaningful   and   reflec3ve     dialogue  around   and  about     student     learning  Culture  of  con3nuous  learning  and  improvement   A  Culture  of  Inquiry   24  
  • 22. 1.  Establishing  goals  and  expectaCons    2.  Strategic  resourcing    3.  Planning,  coordinaCng  and  evaluaCng  teaching   and  the  curriculum    4.  PromoCng  and  parCcipaCng  in  teacher  learning   and  development    5.  Ensuring  an  orderly  and  supporCve  environment    
  • 23. 26  
  • 24.   Teachers  make  a  difference    Differences  in  teacher  effecCveness  were    found  to  be  the  dominant  factor  affecCng    student  academic  gain    “the  implicaCon  …is  that  seemingly  more    can  be  done  to  improve  educaCon  by    improving  the  effecCveness  of  teachers  than    by  any  other  single  factor.”   Wright,  Horn  and  Sanders,  1997   27