CHOOSE CLEAN WATER CONFERENCE 2013LOCAL APPROACHES TO CLIMATE CHANGE INTHE CHESAPEAKESOCIAL APPROACHES TOCLIMATE CHANGEIN ...
Social Responses &Shifting Scales:Barriersto Developing Sea Level ChangeResponses1. lack of available local data;2. the ga...
Approaches to Addressing the SocialComponents of Local Climate Change1) Developing visualization approaches andcommunicati...
Questions1. What are some different ways to involve thepublic in climate change management &design?2. What are the implica...
What are some different ways toinvolve the public in climate changemanagement & design?
Flyer designed by doctoral studentJennifer Salazar.
Workshop Goals• Convey potential impacts to DorchesterCounty stakeholders.• Identify and prioritize locations around theco...
MLA Students Rosamaria Mora, Matt Sickle, and Michael Boeck
Some Examples of ParticularWorkshop Approaches• Identify where residents live and spend time.• Preferences & Priorities(en...
Issues of Concern to Residents andStakeholdersWhat is most important to you?• Roads near homebecoming unusable (#1)• Conce...
2. What are the implications to with theChesapeake Bay Restoration and Clean-up?
LARC 748 – ARCH 403UG COLLABORATIVE STUDIOSTUDENT:MORA, ROSAMARIAPROJECT:KINETIC LANDSCAPES
LARC 748 – ARCH 403UG COLLABORATIVE STUDIOSTUDENT:MOYER, KIMPROJECT:WILDLIFE MASTERPLAN
Stakeholder Involvement Needs:Climate Change Visuals1) To translate complex climate change data into potential impacts att...
Priorities, Visuals, and Trajectories• Developing a series of scenarios of adaptation responses(defend, retreat, or other ...
Implications• Public Involvement Process from Site Analysisto Alternative Responses• Visual Communication Approaches• Time...
References• Cole, Wanda Diane. 2008. Sea Level Rise: Technical Guidance for DorchesterCounty. Maryland Department of Natur...
Dorchester Acknowledgments• Dorchester County, the City of Cambridge, and the Eastern Shore LandConservancy.• Anne Roane, ...
CCW conference: Social approaches to climate change
CCW conference: Social approaches to climate change
CCW conference: Social approaches to climate change
CCW conference: Social approaches to climate change
CCW conference: Social approaches to climate change
CCW conference: Social approaches to climate change
CCW conference: Social approaches to climate change
CCW conference: Social approaches to climate change
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CCW conference: Social approaches to climate change

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Vicky Chanse, Ph.D., Univ of Maryland
Increasingly, climate change is influencing the health of our waterways. In the years and decades to come climate change will be a growing focus of the work of policy-makers, planners, and advocates dedicated to protecting and restoring our watersheds. This panel examines policy approaches, adaptive strategies, and community involvement to ensuring clean water while protecting our communities from the impacts of climate change.

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CCW conference: Social approaches to climate change

  1. 1. CHOOSE CLEAN WATER CONFERENCE 2013LOCAL APPROACHES TO CLIMATE CHANGE INTHE CHESAPEAKESOCIAL APPROACHES TOCLIMATE CHANGEIN THECHESAPEAKE BAY REGIONPanelist:Victoria Chanse, Ph.D.UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND
  2. 2. Social Responses &Shifting Scales:Barriersto Developing Sea Level ChangeResponses1. lack of available local data;2. the gap between hazard-related plans and landuse planning;3. lack of public support;4. competing workplace priorities; and5. limited budgets.(Source: NOAA 2010)
  3. 3. Approaches to Addressing the SocialComponents of Local Climate Change1) Developing visualization approaches andcommunication (NOAA 2010; Schroth 2009)2) Work with with stakeholders and communitiesto develop an understanding of the localizedimpacts and the design responses at the regionaland site scales is critical (Schroth et. al. 2009).(Source: NOAA 2010)
  4. 4. Questions1. What are some different ways to involve thepublic in climate change management &design?2. What are the implicationsof these differentapproaches with regards to the ChesapeakeBay Restoration and Clean-up?
  5. 5. What are some different ways toinvolve the public in climate changemanagement & design?
  6. 6. Flyer designed by doctoral studentJennifer Salazar.
  7. 7. Workshop Goals• Convey potential impacts to DorchesterCounty stakeholders.• Identify and prioritize locations around thecounty.• Examine different design responses andpreferred approaches to incorporate into thedesign.
  8. 8. MLA Students Rosamaria Mora, Matt Sickle, and Michael Boeck
  9. 9. Some Examples of ParticularWorkshop Approaches• Identify where residents live and spend time.• Preferences & Priorities(environmental, builtform, flooding solutions, prioritizing naturalfeatures• Statements in terms of selecting which wasimportant (economic, infrastructure, drinkingwater)• Identification of Issues and locations within thecounty that residents were concerned about.
  10. 10. Issues of Concern to Residents andStakeholdersWhat is most important to you?• Roads near homebecoming unusable (#1)• Concerned about thequality of wells andseptic systems (#2)• Flooding (#3)• Property value (#4)Participation Team:MLA Students Kory Kreiseder, Allison Jensen, Kim Wharton, and Chris Myers
  11. 11. 2. What are the implications to with theChesapeake Bay Restoration and Clean-up?
  12. 12. LARC 748 – ARCH 403UG COLLABORATIVE STUDIOSTUDENT:MORA, ROSAMARIAPROJECT:KINETIC LANDSCAPES
  13. 13. LARC 748 – ARCH 403UG COLLABORATIVE STUDIOSTUDENT:MOYER, KIMPROJECT:WILDLIFE MASTERPLAN
  14. 14. Stakeholder Involvement Needs:Climate Change Visuals1) To translate complex climate change data into potential impacts atthe local scale;2) To examine the different possible trajectories such as retreat orprotect the shoreline by building up (Sheppard 2011);3) To incorporate different types of information(social, ecological, and economic components); and4) Engaging stakeholders in exploring possible responses. Differenttypes of images and maps at different scales inform differentstages of the process and different types of involvement. Personalimages of important local places can quite literally bring climatechange home to audiences.
  15. 15. Priorities, Visuals, and Trajectories• Developing a series of scenarios of adaptation responses(defend, retreat, or other forms of adaptation) for stakeholderworkshops.• Use visuals to engage cross-disciplinary and cross-collaborationwith stakeholders, residents, hazard planners in order to a)identify and prioritize areas and issues of concern and b) toexamine different possibilities. This is particularly pertinentgiven sense of loss in addressing sea level change in DorchesterCounty.• Developing and demonstrating a rationale for planning anddesign decisions.
  16. 16. Implications• Public Involvement Process from Site Analysisto Alternative Responses• Visual Communication Approaches• Time Frames• Scales of Inquiry• Design Exploration of Alternative Responses• Design Exploration
  17. 17. References• Cole, Wanda Diane. 2008. Sea Level Rise: Technical Guidance for DorchesterCounty. Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Coastal Zone ManagementDivision.• National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Services Center. 2010.Hazard and Resiliency Planning—Perceived Benefits and Barriers Among Land UsePlanners: Final Research Report 26 April 2010. Accessed at:www.csc.noaa.gov/publications/social_ science/NOAACSCResearchReport.pdf• Sheppard, Stephen R.J.; Alison Shaw; David Flanders; Sarah Burch, ArnimWiek, JeffCarmichael, John Robinson,andStewart Cohen. 2011. “Future visioning of localclimate change: A framework for community engagement and planning withscenarios and visualization.” Futures 43(4): 410.• Schroth, Olaf, Ellen Pond, Sara Muir-Owen, Cam Campbell, and S.R.J. Sheppard.2009. Tools for the understanding of spatio-temporal climate scenarios in localplanning. National Science Foundation SNSF Bern: Swiss.www.calp.forestry.ubc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/Schroth_2009_Final_SNSF_Report.pdf.• Sheppard, Stephen. 2012. Visualizing Climate Change: A Guide to VisualCommunication of Climate Change and Developing Local Solutions. RoutledgePress.
  18. 18. Dorchester Acknowledgments• Dorchester County, the City of Cambridge, and the Eastern Shore LandConservancy.• Anne Roane, Planner and Landscape Architect and Rodney Banks, HazardPlanner (City of Cambridge, MD).• Thanks to Chris Haynes (NOAA Coastal Services), David Cronrath (School ofArchitecture), Brad McCrea (SF Bay Conservation and DevelopmentCommission, Rising Tides Competition), Olaf Schroth (CALP), Clark Wilson(U.S. EPA), and Zoe Johnson (MD DNR) for their insights, support, and ideasas the project developed.• Spring 2011 LARC748 MLA Students Allison Palmer, Chris Myers, KimWharton, Kory Kreiseder, Matt Sickle, Michael Boeck, and Rosamaria Mora.• Research collaborators Architecture Professor Luis Diego Quiros anddoctoral student Kevin Adams.• Spring 2012 ARCH403 Sections (Architecture Professors RonitEisenbach,Isaac S Williams, and Michael Stanton)• This work would not have been possible without the financial support ofthe 2011-2012 Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station Grant.

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