De milestones

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De milestones

  1. 1. Delaware’s Plan for Clean Water: Is the State on Track? Residents in the region are starting to see the benefits of investments and improvements made in local waterways and the Chesapeake Bay. The practices that protect and restore our waterways—tree plantings, conservation planning, septic hookups, and upgrades to wastewater treatment plants— ultimately improve our quality of life by reducing flooding, securing healthier drinking water, beau- tifying our neighborhoods, and ensuring safer waters for recreation. Unfortunately, despite making progress, the Chesapeake Bay watershed still remains a system dangerously out of balance. Too much nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment pollution continues to run off our lawns, city streets, and farm fields into local creeks and streams and the Bay. In 2010, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Bay jurisdictions established science- based limits for these pollutants and state-specific plans to achieve them, together known as the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint. EPA, the states, and Washington, D.C., also committed to implement actions to achieve 60 percent of the needed reductions by 2017 and 100 percent by 2025. To ensure these clean-water efforts stay on track, each of the states and Washington, D.C., committed to two-year goals or milestones detailing the programs and practices intended to be met in the near- term to achieve the 2017 and 2025 long-term goals. The milestones are a critical accountability tool, providing the opportunity to measure progress in the context of long-term Bay restoration efforts. Be- cause of the importance of the milestones, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation and the Choose Clean Water Coalition are collaborating to evaluate and publicize pollution-reduction progress. This report evaluates, for select practices, whether Delaware achieved its 2012/2013 two-year milestone goals and whether or not this progress is on a trajectory to achieve 60 percent implementation by 2017 and full implementation by 2025. Conclusion Delaware achieved its 2013 goals for four of the seven practices evaluated. These successes were due to strategic funding, partnerships with non-government organizations, and outreach activities. Implement- ing newly accepted statewide septic and polluted-runoff regulations and collecting critical data related to agricultural practices will lead to future progress. But there is room for improvement. In 2014, Gov- ernor Markell announced his Clean Water for Delaware’s Future Initiative which, if approved, will provide the necessary funding needed to implement additional conservation and infrastructure practices and upgrades. It is now up to the legislature to pass his proposal. June 2014 AT A GLANCE Agriculture Animal Waste Management Grass Buffers Wetland Restoration Cover Crops Urban/Suburban Bioretention Urban tree planting Wastewater/Septic Septic System Connection See the charts on the inside of this sheet for more information. For more detailed information on all of Delaware’s milestone goals, go to: www.epa.gov/ reg3wapd/tmdl/Chesapeake Bay/EnsuringResults.html. 2012/2013 FINAL ASSESSMENT Delaware Milestones 6 Herndon Avenue | Annapolis, Maryland 21403 888/SAVEBAY | cbf.org How this Report was Compiled We selected a subset of implemented practices within three pollution source categories—agricultural runoff, urban/subur- ban sources, and wastewater treatment—based on their po- tential to provide substantial nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment pollution reductions and offer important lessons for implementation moving forward. For each practice, progress (% achievement) was evaluated by looking at incremental progress between the base year, 2011, and 2013, compared to the 2013 milestone goal. Progress during this milestone pe- riod was also compared to the long-term (2017 and 2025) implementation benchmarks that the states and Washington, D.C., committed to in their Watershed Implementation Plans. Data were provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Chesapeake Bay Program Office. 706 Giddings Avenue 1-B | Annapolis, Maryland 21401 443/759-3400 | choosecleanwater.org Pollution Reduction in Delaware at a Glance Delaware’s pollution-reduction efforts have led to mixed success: It exceeded its wastewater goal but failed to meet its overall 2013 nitrogen and phosphorus pollution-reduction goals. To meet long term goals, Delaware will need to increase its focus and funding on reducing polluted runoff and imple- menting additional agricultural conservation practices. Success Story Partnerships between private and public entities are key to having clean, healthy water in the Chesapeake Bay region. Rain gardens were installed in four Seaford elementary schools in the Nanticoke water- shed thanks to a partnership between National Wildlife Federation and Delaware Nature Society and with funding support from EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Implementation grants, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and Delaware’s Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. In addition to treating polluted runoff from school property, the project provides an outdoor classroom for 1,870 students and teach- ers as well as the larger Seaford community. The relationships built between the state and non-government organizations has provided a foundation for engaging the public in local water-quality issues. Future plans include similar partnerships to provide opportunities for the public to interact with their local waterways, including kayaking, cleanups by boat, races along waterside trails, and finding out what concerns residents have about their local waterway. These projects will empower people through education and inter- action to take action to protect their local waterways and provide them opportunities to do so. 0 1 4 2025201720132011 2025 GOAL WASTEWATER/SEPTIC AGRICULTURE POLLUTED RUNOFF 3 2 2017 GOAL Modeled Nitrogen Loads and Long Term Goals in Delaware by Sector (millions of pounds) Source: Chesapeake Bay Program Watershed Model 5.3.2 0 50 100 300 350 2025201720132011 2025 GOAL WASTEWATER AGRICULTURE POLLUTED RUNOFF 250 200 150 2017 GOAL Modeled Phosphorus Loads and Long Term Goals in Delaware by Sector (thousands of pounds) *Pollution reduction is ahead of schedule for this sector. * *
  2. 2. Assessment of Delaware’s Progress on Selected Pollution-Reduction Practices for 2013 Animal Waste Management System animal units This practice is one of the most effective at reducing pollution and Delaware has ramped up implementation in the last couple of years. However, it missed its 2013 milestone goal. Acheiving Delaware’s long-term pollution reduction goals will require increased effort and better data verification to ensure all implementation counts towards meeting goals. 0 20,000 40,000 80,000 2011 2015 2019 2021 2023 0 60,000 2013 2017 2025 G 2013 PROGRESS = 104 ACRES 2013 MILESTONE = 99 ACRES Progress Relative to Long-Term Goals (animal units) Grass Buffers acres Like many states, Delaware needs additional funding resources and outreach efforts to incentivize the installation of grass buffers.If passed, the Governor's Clean Water for Delaware’s Future Initiative will provide additional financial resources. 0 2,000 4,000 10,000 2011 2015 2019 2021 2023 0 8,000 2013 2017 2025 G 6,000 31 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL PROGRESS) 916 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL MILESTONE) = 3% Progress Relative to Long-Term Goals (acres) Wetland Restoration acres Delaware partnered with the U.S.Fish andWildlife Service and Ducks Un- limited to ensure that Nanticoke Restoration Plan projects are designed to improve water quality and wildlife habitat.They also want to maximize resources with partners active in the watershed. Looking forward, Delaware will need to accelerate wetland protection to meet 2017 and 2025 goals. 0 1,000 2,000 6,000 2011 2015 2019 2021 2023 0 4,000 2013 2017 2025 3,000 5,000 2,109 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL PROGRESS) 557 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL MILESTONE) = 379% Progress Relative to Long-Term Goals (acres) Cover Crops acres Delaware exceeded its 2013 milestone goal, which was set below 2011 implementation, albeit above 2010 implementation. Improve- ments in tracking implementation by state, federal, and local partners help explain this apparent disconnect. Delaware is on track to meet its long term goals if it maintains progress in cover crops. 0 20,000 100,000 2011 2015 2019 2021 2023 0 2013 2017 G 2025 G 40,000 80,000 60,000 49,786 (2013 PROGRESS) 36,809 (2013 MILESTONE) = 135%* Progress Relative to Long-Term Goals (acres) Urban Tree Planting acres Funds provided by the U.S. Forest Service, Delaware and the Non- Point Source (319) Program were used to create the “Trees for the Bay” Program that offers residents a $100 tree coupon with a rain barrel purchase. Delaware’s 2013 milestone goal was equal to 2011 imple- mentation, but this successful federal-state partnership demonstrates that it could set more aggressive targets. 0 40 60 120 2011 2015 2019 2021 2023 100 2013 2017 G 2025 G 20 80 Progress Relative to Long-Term Goals (acres) Bioretention* acres Delaware has made great progress implementing this practice, far ex- ceeding its 2013 milestone goal. Delaware’s long-term goals for this practice are modest, but this success indicates they should consider setting more aggressive goals. 0 40 60 80 2011 2015 2019 2021 20232013 2017 G 2025 G 20 Progress Relative to Long-Term Goals (acres) Septic Connections systems Progress partially reflects efforts to include more accurate, previously implemented, septic connection data. New regulations and the Gov- ernor’s Clean Water for Delaware’s Future Initiative, if passed, will re- sult in additional septic hookups.These new hookups are critical to meeting aggressive long-term goals. 0 4,000 6,000 8,000 2011 2015 2019 2021 20232013 2017 G 2025 G 2,000 309 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL PROGRESS) 476 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL MILESTONE) = 65% Progress Relative to Long-Term Goals (systems) Agriculture Urban/Suburban Polluted Runoff Wastewater/Septic *Cover Crop % accomplished is calculated as 2013 Progress/2013 Milestone 27 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL PROGRESS) 3 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL MILESTONE) = 900% 8,395 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL PROGRESS) 15,877 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL MILESTONE) = 53% P PROGRESS M MILESTONE P M P M P M P M P M P M P M P M P M P M P M P M M P P M *Bioretention acres are designed to collect and filter polluted runoff before it *reaches rivers, streams, and the Bay. MILESTONEPROGRESS MILESTONEPROGRESS MILESTONEPROGRESS MILESTONEPROGRESS MILESTONEPROGRESS MILESTONEPROGRESS MILESTONEPROGRESS
  3. 3. Assessment of Delaware’s Progress on Selected Pollution-Reduction Practices for 2013 Animal Waste Management System animal units This practice is one of the most effective at reducing pollution and Delaware has ramped up implementation in the last couple of years. However, it missed its 2013 milestone goal. Acheiving Delaware’s long-term pollution reduction goals will require increased effort and better data verification to ensure all implementation counts towards meeting goals. 0 20,000 40,000 80,000 2011 2015 2019 2021 2023 0 60,000 2013 2017 2025 G 2013 PROGRESS = 104 ACRES 2013 MILESTONE = 99 ACRES Progress Relative to Long-Term Goals (animal units) Grass Buffers acres Like many states, Delaware needs additional funding resources and outreach efforts to incentivize the installation of grass buffers.If passed, the Governor's Clean Water for Delaware’s Future Initiative will provide additional financial resources. 0 2,000 4,000 10,000 2011 2015 2019 2021 2023 0 8,000 2013 2017 2025 G 6,000 31 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL PROGRESS) 916 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL MILESTONE) = 3% Progress Relative to Long-Term Goals (acres) Wetland Restoration acres Delaware partnered with the U.S.Fish andWildlife Service and Ducks Un- limited to ensure that Nanticoke Restoration Plan projects are designed to improve water quality and wildlife habitat.They also want to maximize resources with partners active in the watershed. Looking forward, Delaware will need to accelerate wetland protection to meet 2017 and 2025 goals. 0 1,000 2,000 6,000 2011 2015 2019 2021 2023 0 4,000 2013 2017 2025 3,000 5,000 2,109 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL PROGRESS) 557 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL MILESTONE) = 379% Progress Relative to Long-Term Goals (acres) Cover Crops acres Delaware exceeded its 2013 milestone goal, which was set below 2011 implementation, albeit above 2010 implementation. Improve- ments in tracking implementation by state, federal, and local partners help explain this apparent disconnect. Delaware is on track to meet its long term goals if it maintains progress in cover crops. 0 20,000 100,000 2011 2015 2019 2021 2023 0 2013 2017 G 2025 G 40,000 80,000 60,000 49,786 (2013 PROGRESS) 36,809 (2013 MILESTONE) = 135%* Progress Relative to Long-Term Goals (acres) Urban Tree Planting acres Funds provided by the U.S. Forest Service, Delaware and the Non- Point Source (319) Program were used to create the “Trees for the Bay” Program that offers residents a $100 tree coupon with a rain barrel purchase. Delaware’s 2013 milestone goal was equal to 2011 imple- mentation, but this successful federal-state partnership demonstrates that it could set more aggressive targets. 0 40 60 120 2011 2015 2019 2021 2023 100 2013 2017 G 2025 G 20 80 Progress Relative to Long-Term Goals (acres) Bioretention* acres Delaware has made great progress implementing this practice, far ex- ceeding its 2013 milestone goal. Delaware’s long-term goals for this practice are modest, but this success indicates they should consider setting more aggressive goals. 0 40 60 80 2011 2015 2019 2021 20232013 2017 G 2025 G 20 Progress Relative to Long-Term Goals (acres) Septic Connections systems Progress partially reflects efforts to include more accurate, previously implemented, septic connection data. New regulations and the Gov- ernor’s Clean Water for Delaware’s Future Initiative, if passed, will re- sult in additional septic hookups.These new hookups are critical to meeting aggressive long-term goals. 0 4,000 6,000 8,000 2011 2015 2019 2021 20232013 2017 G 2025 G 2,000 309 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL PROGRESS) 476 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL MILESTONE) = 65% Progress Relative to Long-Term Goals (systems) Agriculture Urban/Suburban Polluted Runoff Wastewater/Septic *Cover Crop % accomplished is calculated as 2013 Progress/2013 Milestone 27 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL PROGRESS) 3 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL MILESTONE) = 900% 8,395 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL PROGRESS) 15,877 (2-YEAR INCREMENTAL MILESTONE) = 53% P PROGRESS M MILESTONE P M P M P M P M P M P M P M P M P M P M P M P M M P P M *Bioretention acres are designed to collect and filter polluted runoff before it *reaches rivers, streams, and the Bay. MILESTONEPROGRESS MILESTONEPROGRESS MILESTONEPROGRESS MILESTONEPROGRESS MILESTONEPROGRESS MILESTONEPROGRESS MILESTONEPROGRESS
  4. 4. Delaware’s Plan for Clean Water: Is the State on Track? Residents in the region are starting to see the benefits of investments and improvements made in local waterways and the Chesapeake Bay. The practices that protect and restore our waterways—tree plantings, conservation planning, septic hookups, and upgrades to wastewater treatment plants— ultimately improve our quality of life by reducing flooding, securing healthier drinking water, beau- tifying our neighborhoods, and ensuring safer waters for recreation. Unfortunately, despite making progress, the Chesapeake Bay watershed still remains a system dangerously out of balance. Too much nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment pollution continues to run off our lawns, city streets, and farm fields into local creeks and streams and the Bay. In 2010, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Bay jurisdictions established science- based limits for these pollutants and state-specific plans to achieve them, together known as the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint. EPA, the states, and Washington, D.C., also committed to implement actions to achieve 60 percent of the needed reductions by 2017 and 100 percent by 2025. To ensure these clean-water efforts stay on track, each of the states and Washington, D.C., committed to two-year goals or milestones detailing the programs and practices intended to be met in the near- term to achieve the 2017 and 2025 long-term goals. The milestones are a critical accountability tool, providing the opportunity to measure progress in the context of long-term Bay restoration efforts. Be- cause of the importance of the milestones, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation and the Choose Clean Water Coalition are collaborating to evaluate and publicize pollution-reduction progress. This report evaluates, for select practices, whether Delaware achieved its 2012/2013 two-year milestone goals and whether or not this progress is on a trajectory to achieve 60 percent implementation by 2017 and full implementation by 2025. Conclusion Delaware achieved its 2013 goals for four of the seven practices evaluated. These successes were due to strategic funding, partnerships with non-government organizations, and outreach activities. Implement- ing newly accepted statewide septic and polluted-runoff regulations and collecting critical data related to agricultural practices will lead to future progress. But there is room for improvement. In 2014, Gov- ernor Markell announced his Clean Water for Delaware’s Future Initiative which, if approved, will provide the necessary funding needed to implement additional conservation and infrastructure practices and upgrades. It is now up to the legislature to pass his proposal. June 2014 AT A GLANCE Agriculture Animal Waste Management Grass Buffers Wetland Restoration Cover Crops Urban/Suburban Bioretention Urban tree planting Wastewater/Septic Septic System Connection See the charts on the inside of this sheet for more information. For more detailed information on all of Delaware’s milestone goals, go to: www.epa.gov/ reg3wapd/tmdl/Chesapeake Bay/EnsuringResults.html. 2012/2013 FINAL ASSESSMENT Delaware Milestones 6 Herndon Avenue | Annapolis, Maryland 21403 888/SAVEBAY | cbf.org How this Report was Compiled We selected a subset of implemented practices within three pollution source categories—agricultural runoff, urban/subur- ban sources, and wastewater treatment—based on their po- tential to provide substantial nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment pollution reductions and offer important lessons for implementation moving forward. For each practice, progress (% achievement) was evaluated by looking at incremental progress between the base year, 2011, and 2013, compared to the 2013 milestone goal. Progress during this milestone pe- riod was also compared to the long-term (2017 and 2025) implementation benchmarks that the states and Washington, D.C., committed to in their Watershed Implementation Plans. Data were provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Chesapeake Bay Program Office. 706 Giddings Avenue 1-B | Annapolis, Maryland 21401 443/759-3400 | choosecleanwater.org Pollution Reduction in Delaware at a Glance Delaware’s pollution-reduction efforts have led to mixed success: It exceeded its wastewater goal but failed to meet its overall 2013 nitrogen and phosphorus pollution-reduction goals. To meet long term goals, Delaware will need to increase its focus and funding on reducing polluted runoff and imple- menting additional agricultural conservation practices. Success Story Partnerships between private and public entities are key to having clean, healthy water in the Chesapeake Bay region. Rain gardens were installed in four Seaford elementary schools in the Nanticoke water- shed thanks to a partnership between National Wildlife Federation and Delaware Nature Society and with funding support from EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Implementation grants, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and Delaware’s Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. In addition to treating polluted runoff from school property, the project provides an outdoor classroom for 1,870 students and teach- ers as well as the larger Seaford community. The relationships built between the state and non-government organizations has provided a foundation for engaging the public in local water-quality issues. Future plans include similar partnerships to provide opportunities for the public to interact with their local waterways, including kayaking, cleanups by boat, races along waterside trails, and finding out what concerns residents have about their local waterway. These projects will empower people through education and inter- action to take action to protect their local waterways and provide them opportunities to do so. 0 1 4 2025201720132011 2025 GOAL WASTEWATER/SEPTIC AGRICULTURE POLLUTED RUNOFF 3 2 2017 GOAL Modeled Nitrogen Loads and Long Term Goals in Delaware by Sector (millions of pounds) Source: Chesapeake Bay Program Watershed Model 5.3.2 0 50 100 300 350 2025201720132011 2025 GOAL WASTEWATER AGRICULTURE POLLUTED RUNOFF 250 200 150 2017 GOAL Modeled Phosphorus Loads and Long Term Goals in Delaware by Sector (thousands of pounds) *Pollution reduction is ahead of schedule for this sector. * *

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