Traveston Dam: The Ramsar Ramifications

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Presentation at "The River, the Bay and the Strait" public forum at Hervey Bay on 5 October 2008.

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Traveston Dam: The Ramsar Ramifications

  1. 1. INTERGENERATIONAL EQUITY REGIONAL INTERGENERATIONAL EQUITY THE BUCK STOPS HERE
  2. 2. <ul><li>Ramsar : </li></ul><ul><li>In a Ramsar context, the appropriate spatial scale may sometimes be wider than the ecosystem. In particular, the river basin (water catchment) is an important spatial scale at which to address aspects of wetland-related impacts. Also, where impacts on particularly important species values, such as migratory fish or birds, are at stake, assessment at the scale of the migratory range (flyway) of the relevant populations will be very relevant. This may involve a chain of ecosystems (perhaps disjunct ones), and therefore may need to take a broader perspective than would normally be the case under the ecosystem approach. </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Wetlands: water, life, and culture&quot; 8th Meeting of the Conference of the Contracting Parties to the Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) Valencia, Spain, 18-26 November 2002 </li></ul><ul><li>RAMSAR Resolution VIII.9 </li></ul><ul><li>1. Purpose and approach </li></ul><ul><li>“ The environmental impact assessment process, in order to be effective, should be fully incorporated into existing legal planning processes and not be seen as an &quot;add-on&quot; process.” </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>“ With regard to biodiversity considerations, the ecosystem approach, as described in decision V/6 of the Conference of the Parties is an appropriate framework for the assessment of planned action and policies. In accordance with the approach, the proper temporal ( Timing of flows) and spatial scales ( size of flows) of the problems should be determined as well as the functions of biodiversity and their tangible and intangible values for humans that could be affected by the proposed project or policy, the type of adaptive mitigation measures and the need for the participation of stakeholders in decision-making. </li></ul>
  5. 5. MORETON RAMSAR GSS RAMSAR
  6. 6. <ul><li>FAILURE TO ADDRESS RAMSAR VALUES ADEQUATELY </li></ul><ul><li>The EIS fails to adequately address the wetlands policy intent of the </li></ul><ul><li>Widebay Burnett Regional Growth Plan 2006, </li></ul><ul><li>Draft Widebay Coastal Management Plan 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>State Coastal Management Plan 2002, </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>The EIS does not adequately address and is in conflict with the policies of the Widebay Burnett Regional Plan 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>POLICY 1.4 Water Supply , </li></ul><ul><li>Policy Principle 1.4.1 , </li></ul><ul><li>“ Management of regional water resources will balance economic and social outcomes within the ecological capacity of catchment ecosystems, and be cognizant of the implications of seasonal climate variability and long term climate change”. </li></ul><ul><li>Policy Action; </li></ul><ul><li>“ development of risk management strategies addressing security of both rural and urban water supplies;” </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>POLICY 2 .2 BIODIVERSITY, </li></ul><ul><li>Policy Principle , 2.2.1 </li></ul><ul><li>“ The extent, function and condition of wetlands is maintained and improved, enhancing their capacity to sustain habitat for dependant flora and fauna species and hydrological processes” </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Policy Principle 2.2.3 , </li></ul><ul><li>“ Aquatic ecosystems, their constituent species and related processes </li></ul><ul><li>are maintained and improved”. </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>POLICY 2.3 Coastal Environments, </li></ul><ul><li>Policy Principle 2.3.2 </li></ul><ul><li>“ High value natural assets of the coast are protected from incompatible uses and managed for community benefit.” </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>POLICY 7.2 </li></ul><ul><li>Regional Water Supply </li></ul><ul><li>W ater supply is expected to be a major limiting factor for growth in many of the region’s communities. </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>This is likely to be exacerbated by projected population growth in coastal areas, coupled with predicted climate change impacts of increased temperatures and rainfall uncertainty. Potential disruption to industrial, agricultural and urban growth through drought and water shortages could adversely affect prosperity and quality of life aspirations for the region’s inhabitants. </li></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>Objective: </li></ul><ul><li>To provide sufficient water and related infrastructure to service the needs of the community and economic activities in the region whilst maintaining healthy ecosystems. </li></ul>
  14. 14. <ul><li>Policy Principle: 7.2.1 </li></ul><ul><li>Regional and sub regional collaboration, planning and coordination of the Wide Bay Burnett water resources to ensure the efficient, cost effective and sustainable management of the region’s water catchments, impoundments and distributions systems. </li></ul>
  15. 15. <ul><li>Environmental Protection (Water) Policy 1997 </li></ul><ul><li>Great Sandy Strait </li></ul><ul><li>Environmental Values </li></ul><ul><li>and </li></ul><ul><li>Water Quality Objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Adjacent to River Basins No. 137 to 140 </li></ul>
  16. 16. <ul><li>Environmental Protection (Water) Policy 1997 </li></ul><ul><li>Great Sandy Strait Coastal Creeks </li></ul><ul><li>Environmental Values </li></ul><ul><li>and </li></ul><ul><li>Water Quality Objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Basin No. 140 (part) </li></ul>
  17. 17. <ul><li>EIS </li></ul><ul><li>1.7.1 Relevant Legislation and Policy Requirements </li></ul><ul><li>“ The EIS should identify all relevant legislation, policies and strategies, as well as assess their specific implications and requirements for the Project and impact assessment.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ The proponent will need to identify and address other strategies, subordinate legislation and related management or planning processes that may be relevant to the assessment of the Project.” </li></ul>
  18. 18. <ul><li>HAVE ANY OF THESE POLICIES BEEN INCLUDED IN THE EIS AND OR THE SUPPLEMENTARY ? </li></ul>
  19. 19. <ul><li>NO ( ENGLISH) </li></ul><ul><li>Ándi (Charagua (Bolivia) </li></ul><ul><li>A'na ( Esselen ) </li></ul><ul><li>MIK’ ( Mapudungun [Mapuche] </li></ul><ul><li>BU SHI (MANDARIN ( K 07) </li></ul><ul><li>Wan ka ( Manchu ) </li></ul><ul><li>NYET ( RUSSIAN ) </li></ul><ul><li>NAE ( GAELIC) </li></ul><ul><li>LAA ( ARABIC) </li></ul><ul><li>BOBO ( Bété (Cameroon) </li></ul><ul><li>HAA HA ( CHECHEN ) </li></ul><ul><li>YEE HE ( Pulawat (Micronesia) </li></ul><ul><li>NULLIUS DEMOCRATIS ( LATIN ) </li></ul>
  20. 20. DESAL <ul><li>1460 MGL A YEAR </li></ul><ul><li>4 MGL A DAY </li></ul><ul><li>4 MGL OF BRINE DISCHARGE PER DAY </li></ul><ul><li>$10M = $6849 PER MGL </li></ul><ul><li>1.6 TONNES COAL PER MGL </li></ul><ul><li>4.8 TONNES GHG PER MGL </li></ul>
  21. 21. TANKS <ul><li>100m ² roof x 1000mm rain </li></ul><ul><li>Produces 100,000 litres per year </li></ul><ul><li>10,000 X 100m² roofs = 1000 MGL YEAR </li></ul><ul><li>14,600 x 100m² roofs = 1460MGL per year </li></ul><ul><li>$10M / $2000 ( 2000 LTR TANK PLUMBED INTO SUPPLY ) </li></ul><ul><li>= 5000 TANKS </li></ul><ul><li>= STORES 10 MGL IF ALL FULL </li></ul><ul><li>NO DESAL DISCHARGE </li></ul><ul><li>NO WATER SUPPLIER PROFIT MARGIN </li></ul>

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