Access and Availability of Research Results Pathways to Accessibility CIAT KSW, Cali 18 May 2009
Agenda <ul><ul><li>Introduction - Peter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Licensing and IP - Peter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rep...
The Pathways <ul><li>Proven pathways by which the outputs of agricultural research can be made truly available, accessible...
Initial Pathways <ul><li>Pathway 2:  Develop an Institutional Repository (IR) for digital content </li></ul><ul><li>Pathwa...
Copyrights
 
 
Creative Commons
 
Journal articles <ul><li>“ Typically, when an article is published, the author assigns copyright, or gives a copyright lic...
Open Access <ul><li>Takes the results of research that has already been paid for and makes it freely available on-line, th...
 
 
Repositories <ul><li>Subject to copyright, authors can deposit copies of their finished articles in open access repositori...
 
 
 
 
 
 
Summary <ul><li>Adopt more open licenses for outputs </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiate ‘less generous’ copyright agreements with...
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Access and Availability of Research Results: Pathways to Accessibility

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Presentation by Peter Ballantyne for the CIAT KSW 2009

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Access and Availability of Research Results: Pathways to Accessibility

  1. 1. Access and Availability of Research Results Pathways to Accessibility CIAT KSW, Cali 18 May 2009
  2. 2. Agenda <ul><ul><li>Introduction - Peter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Licensing and IP - Peter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repositories - Peter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social media - Simone </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. The Pathways <ul><li>Proven pathways by which the outputs of agricultural research can be made truly available, accessible and applicable. </li></ul><ul><li>ICT-KM and CIARD are documenting and piloting pathways across the CGIAR </li></ul>
  4. 4. Initial Pathways <ul><li>Pathway 2:  Develop an Institutional Repository (IR) for digital content </li></ul><ul><li>Pathway 4:  Digitize older outputs, to be 'born again' digital </li></ul><ul><li>Pathway 5:  Conform to international standard metadata and vocabularies </li></ul><ul><li>Pathway 6:  Give your metadata high visibility with search engines </li></ul><ul><li>Pathway 7:  Make content accessible through AGRIS, CABI and preference schemes </li></ul><ul><li>Pathway 8:  Make content available through services like Google Scholar and Books </li></ul><ul><li>Pathway 9:  Work with publishers who have flexible policies on open access </li></ul><ul><li>Pathway 10:  Make content accessible across web, email, phone </li></ul><ul><li>Pathway 11:  Beyond articles and reports: Use video and images </li></ul><ul><li>Pathway 12:  Beyond articles and reports: try out 'social' media </li></ul><ul><li>Pathway 13:  Publish and promote outputs with newsfeeds </li></ul><ul><li>Pathway 14:  Set up added value services that query across platforms </li></ul><ul><li>Pathway 15:  License content to encourage use and re-use </li></ul><ul><li>Pathway 20:  Repackage research to make it more 'usable' for other stakeholders ? </li></ul><ul><li>Pathway 21:  Engage with partners in networks for innovation </li></ul><ul><li>Pathway 22:  Embed knowledge sharing along the research cycle </li></ul>
  5. 5. Copyrights
  6. 8. Creative Commons
  7. 10. Journal articles <ul><li>“ Typically, when an article is published, the author assigns copyright, or gives a copyright license to the publisher. Depending on the particular agreement that is signed, the author retains more or less rights to use the article. Some agreements forbid the author from photocopying the article, using it in teaching, or mounting it on-line. Other agreements are more liberal and allow the author to retain rights to use the article as they wish.” www.sherpa.ac.uk </li></ul>
  8. 11. Open Access <ul><li>Takes the results of research that has already been paid for and makes it freely available on-line, through repositories and websites. </li></ul><ul><li>Several routes: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Capture agreed articles in repositories </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Purchase open version of an article </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Publish in an open access journal </li></ul></ul>
  9. 14. Repositories <ul><li>Subject to copyright, authors can deposit copies of their finished articles in open access repositories alongside their publication in normal journals.  </li></ul><ul><li>Such  institutional repositories  share records about their content with service providers, who then offer search services to users across every record that they hold.  </li></ul><ul><li>Repositories can also be used to store, in systematic ways, all kinds of other research outputs. If well-designed they can also be tools to promote visibility of their content. Such repositories also for subjects. </li></ul>
  10. 21. Summary <ul><li>Adopt more open licenses for outputs </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiate ‘less generous’ copyright agreements with publishers so you can re-use your publications </li></ul><ul><li>Deposit outputs in proper repositories </li></ul>

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