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Classic Facilitator Report
Sample Report
(5 People)
Saturday, October 12, 2013
This report is provided by:
Strengthscape
D 303 SJR Equinox
Electronic City Phase 1
Bangalore 560 100 India
Contact: +91 80 88 877 877
www.strengthscape.com
© 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in
any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.
10051
Sample Report 2
Overview
DiSC®
Facilitator Report
Overview of the DiSC®
Facilitator Report
For more than 30 years, DiSC®
has helped people improve performance, deal more effectively with conflict,
and value differences. DiSC recognizes that the first step toward change is understanding why we act the way
we do. This facilitator report is designed to help you better understand the diversity of interpersonal styles
within your group so that you can help participants use their DiSC knowledge most effectively.
DiSC can be used in a variety of contexts to help deliver different insights and benefits. The tool is most
frequently used to help individuals and groups
Understand their preferences, strengths, and growth areas
Appreciate personal diversity
Develop a common language to discuss personal styles
Create a dialogue about personal preferences, frustrations, and differences
Relate to those around them
This facilitator report provides a wide range of information about your group. Use the table of contents below
to determine what information best suits the purpose of your intervention and your facilitation style and
strategy.
Page 3 Breakdown by DiSC Quadrant shows the percentage of people who receive high, moderate,
or low scores in each of the DiSC styles. Each quadrant also displays the percentage of
people who received that style as their primary or secondary style.
Page 4 DiSC Styles Distribution displays the percentage of people who received high, moderate, or
low scores in each of the DiSC styles. This section also allows you to compare your group
distribution in the four styles against the general reference data.
Page 5 Classical Pattern Distribution lists the number and percentage of people who received each
Classical Pattern. Reference data is also provided as a point of comparison.
Page 6 DiSC and Group Culture provides an overview of each DiSC style as it relates to group
culture. This section describes how you read your DiSC culture and helps facilitators
understand the challenges and frustrations that individuals within that culture may face.
Page 16 Individual Data Table lists each individual, his/her primary DiSC style(s), secondary DiSC
style(s), Classical Pattern, and segment numbers. Names are organized by highest DiSC
style.
For smaller groups, the end of this report contains a bonus reference page that shows the DiSC quadrants and
lists members who had their highest DiSC score in each quadrant. This page will not be generated if there are
too many people to fit into a single quadrant (i.e., more than 40 people in a single DiSC quadrant).
© 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in
any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.
10051
Sample Report 3
DiSC®
Styles
DiSC®
Facilitator Report
Group Size: 5
Breakdown by DiSC®
Quadrant
The DiSC®
quadrants in the box below show the percentage of people who received high scores in the D, i, S,
or C styles. A score is considered high if it is in segments 5, 6, or 7. Note that individuals can have high
scores in more than one style, and consequently these percentages will sum to over 100%.
At the bottom of each quadrant, percentages indicate how many people have each DiSC style as their primary
or secondary style. A DiSC style is considered primary if it has the highest DiSC segment score for that
individual (or tied for highest). A DiSC style is considered secondary if it has a segment score of 5, 6, or 7,
but is not the highest DiSC segment score. Note that a person can have several primary or secondary styles.
Active/Fast Pace
enjoys a faster pace that is
bold, assertive, and dynamic
80%
Questioning/
Logic Focus
on reason, ideas, or,
facts
40%
D
40% High
20% Primary
20% Secondary
i
60% High
60% Primary
0% Secondary
C
20% High
20% Primary
0% Secondary
S
40% High
20% Primary
20% Secondary
Accepting/
People Focus
on relationships or
feelings
80%
Thoughtful/Moderate Pace
enjoys a moderate pace that is
systematic, calm, and careful
60%
The right and left sides of the box above show the percentage of people who scored on a DiSC style with
either a Questioning/Logic Focus (people with a high D and/or high C) or Accepting/People Focus (people
with a high I and/or high S). The top and bottom of the box above show the number of people who scored high
on a DiSC style with either an Active/Fast Pace (people with a high D and/or high I) or Thoughtful/Moderate
Pace (people with a high C and/or high S). Note that an individual can be classified in both the Questioning/
Logic Focus and the Accepting/People Focus categories, as well as in both the Active/Fast Pace and the
Thoughtful/Moderate Pace categories.
NOTE: Because group members
can be classified in more than one
category, the percentages here will
almost always sum above 100%
© 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in
any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.
10051
Sample Report 4
DiSC®
Styles
DiSC®
Facilitator Report
Group Size: 5
DiSC®
Styles Distribution
The table below shows the percentage of individuals in each score category (i.e., high, medium, or low) for
each DiSC®
style. This table also shows the percentages of people who received each DiSC style as their
primary or secondary style.
D i S C
High Score 40% 60% 40% 20%
Primary 20% 60% 20% 20%
Secondary 20% 0% 20% 0%
Moderate Score 40% 0% 20% 20%
Low Score 20% 40% 40% 60%
A score is considered high if it is in segments 5, 6, or 7; moderate if it is in segment 4; and low if it is in segments 1, 2, or 3. A high DiSC score is
considered primary if it is the highest DiSC segment score for that individual (or tied for highest). A DiSC style is considered secondary if it has a
segment score of 5, 6, or 7, but is not the highest DiSC segment score. Note that a person can have two primary or secondary styles.
Comparison with the general reference group
The bar graphs below allow you to compare your group with the general reference group. The height of bars
indicates the percentage of people who received high scores in each DiSC style. The darker bar represents
your group, and the lighter bar represents the general reference group, which includes DiSC data from over
20,000 respondents.*
* This reference group data is provided so that you can compare your group to others who have taken the DiSC online
assessment. Note that compared to the general population, this sample contains a large number of managers and
professionals. See the text on the bottom of the next page for information about using reference group data and making
comparisons. The next page also describes the demographic characteristics of the sample.
Percentageofpeople
receivinghighscores
0%
20%
40%
60%
80%
100%
D i S C
Your group
The general reference group
© 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in
any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.
10051
Sample Report 5
Classical Patterns
DiSC®
Facilitator Report
Classical Pattern Distribution
The table below lists the number and percentage of people who received each Classical Pattern. Note that the
“% within reference group” column reflects reference data from over 20,000 men and women who have
previously taken the online assessment*t
.
Classical
Patterns
# of
people
% of
group
% within
reference group*t
DC Creative 1 20% 18%
I Promoter 1 20% 8%
Is Counselor 1 20% 5%
Id Persuader 1 20% 5%
S Specialist 1 20% 2%
SC Perfectionist 0 0% 16%
DI Inspirational 0 0% 11%
Di Result-Oriented 0 0% 8%
D Developer 0 0% 7%
C Objective Thinker 0 0% 7%
Cis Practitioner 0 0% 5%
Ic Appraiser 0 0% 4%
Si Agent 0 0% 2%
Sd Achiever 0 0% 1%
Sdc Investigator 0 0% 1%
Total 5
t
The reference group data is presented in this report so that you can compare your group to other people who have taken the DiSC
online assessment. The reference sample was gathered from a sample of over 20,000 men and women who have taken the online
profile for a variety of different purposes. The distribution of race in this sample was 12% African American, 5% Asian American, 75%
Caucasian, 7% Hispanic, and 2% Native American. Gender was equally distributed and all individuals in the sample were above the
age of 18. Note that compared to the general population, this sample contains a large number of managers and professionals.
* Note that there are many reasons why your group's percentages could be different from the reference group data. First, the reference
group is composed of people who have taken the online version of DiSC. Because this sample contains a large number of managers
and people within professional fields, groups that work outside these areas sometimes see a different pattern of DiSC scores within
their group. In addition, your group's selection methods may systematically prefer some styles over others. Or the nature of the work
that your group does may attract certain styles. As well, the culture of the group may shape behavioral styles. Many differences will
also be due to pure chance, especially if your group is small. Only in very large groups would we expect a group's percentages to
closely match the reference group's percentages. Consequently, facilitators should only pay attention to those differences that are
sizable.
© 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in
any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.
10051
Sample Report 6
DiSC®
and Group Culture
DiSC®
Facilitator Report
DiSC®
and Group Culture
Just as individuals have unique styles, groups also tend to develop their own unique styles or cultures. This
culture is an informal combination of behaviors, values, and attitudes that most people in the group take for
granted. Put in the simplest terms, culture is “the way we do things.” Although not everybody agrees with or
flows with the culture, most group members feel the pressure that a culture exerts to act in a certain way.
DiSC®
does not address all elements of culture, but it helps you understand many important needs, goals,
fears, emotions, and behaviors within your culture.
Why is group culture important?
Group culture has a large impact on the behavior, attitudes, and satisfaction of each group member. People
who fit into the culture often feel right at home in the group. But for other people, the culture leads them to feel
like strangers in a strange land. The environment makes them uncomfortable.
Culture also has implications for the group as a whole. It affects such things as the pace at which work gets
done, how outsiders are treated, the attention paid to details, or risks that the group takes. These in turn
influence the success of the group in meeting its goals.
Where does group culture come from?
Group culture is not simply the average of all the people in the group. A number of different factors determine
group culture, such as:
The style of the group leaders
The most pronounced styles within the group
The type of work the group does
The historical culture of the group
The cohesion or tension within the group
The goals and mission that the group faces
These are just some of the factors that help shape group culture. Understanding the origins of your culture
may be important if you hope to change it.
© 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in
any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.
10051
Sample Report 7
DiSC®
and Group Culture
DiSC®
Facilitator Report
Your DiSC®
Culture
How do I know my group’s DiSC culture?
Just as you can learn to read individuals’ styles, you can also learn to read the DiSC®
style of a group. Does
your group culture have a thoughtful, careful, and moderate pace (S and C styles) or does it have active,
assertive, fast pace (D and i styles)? Consider that 80% of your group members enjoy an active/fast pace and
60% enjoy a thoughtful/moderate pace. Does your group culture have more of a questioning orientation (C
and D styles) or an accepting orientation (i and S styles)? Consider that 40% of your group members tend to
be questioning, placing a high priority on concerns like logic and objectivity and 80% tend to be accepting,
placing a high priority on concerns like relationships and feelings.
As you examine the graphs above, consider the following points:
The pace of your group members is more active than thoughtful. The group probably contains a
number of assertive people who are quick decision makers. This often creates a dynamic and fast-
paced culture. Consider if this sets the pace for the rest of the group.
Most of your group members have a tendency to be more accepting and agreeable than questioning
and skeptical. These are people who probably prioritize empathy and personal feelings over logic and
objectivity. This often contributes to a warm and inviting culture that might come across as a little too
"touchy-feely" for some high C and high D individuals. Consider if this describes your group culture.
Other considerations
You also may want to think about what is important to your group. What behaviors does it reward and what
behaviors does it criticize? The following pages describe each of the four DiSC cultures. Read through these
descriptions and decide which ones, if any, describe your group. Some groups find that a blend of two DiSC
styles describes their culture best. On the other hand, some groups find that none of the DiSC styles really
describe their culture. Or even beyond this, some groups find that there are important subgroups that each
have their own DiSC culture.
The following information on group culture is designed to help you understand some of the challenges and
frustrations that your group members might face. As well, this will help you recognize their unique
contributions, particularly those who differ from the dominant culture. Finally, understanding culture will allow
you to understand some of the difficulties with which your group might struggle.
Percentageofpeoplein
eachcategoryhighscore
0%
20%
40%
60%
80%
100%
Questioning/
Logic Focus
Accepting/
People Focus
0%
20%
40%
60%
80%
100%
Active/Fast-
Paced
Thoughtful/
Moderate-Paced
© 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in
any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.
10051
Sample Report 8
DiSC®
and Group Culture
DiSC®
Facilitator Report
The “D” Culture
The percentage of your group members (40%) who have high scores on the Dominance style is somewhat
lower than the average group taking this online profile (53%). Although unlikely, consider if this style
describes your group culture. The hallmarks of a D culture are quick decisions, direct answers, and a
competitive atmosphere. This culture values solid results and powerful growth. Trust is given to those who are
direct and straightforward. People who thrive in this setting tend to be hard-driving individuals who relish
challenges and the thrill of victory. Such an environment is ideal for those who wish to climb the corporate
ladder and achieve success. Interpersonal communication, however, may suffer in this culture, and those who
are less assertive may feel overwhelmed. In addition, such a culture may struggle with high turnover and a
stressful environment.
Rewards: Criticizes:
Independence Hesitation
Decisiveness Overanalysis
Directness Foot-dragging
Victory Over-sensitivity
Results Weakness
Working in the “D” Culture
The D culture offers benefits and challenges for people with each of the four DiSC®
styles.
High-D individuals
High-D individuals embrace this culture’s aggressive pace. They see the environment as ideal for achieving
their goals and moving their careers forward. Their desire to win every encounter is based not only on what
they believe is best for themselves, but for the organization as well. In this way, their determination earns them
the respect of their colleagues, who may look to them for leadership. However, their assertiveness makes them
prime for conflicts with peers, especially those who share their high-D tendencies.
High-i individuals
People who are high in i appreciate the speed with which their ideas are implemented and the enthusiasm that
the environment cultivates. In addition, their energetic approach to projects is a great benefit to the
organization. The organization, however, may not be as exuberant in recognizing their great work as the high-i
would like.
High-S individuals
High-S people often find a niche as a sympathetic ear among the hard-charging negotiations and constant
striving of this culture. These individuals help the organization by applying their people skills whenever they
can. … However, they may often feel hurt and stressed in a setting that they believe is cold and harsh.
Further, they may feel that their ideas get overrun by those they see as more aggressive and pushy. Finally,
the frequent sense of urgency in this culture may upset their preference for a systematic and predictable
approach to problem solving.
High-C individuals
These individuals like that business is at the forefront in this culture. They are pleased that achieving goals is a
top priority and that time is not spent on small talk. With their dedication to resolving the details and analyzing
the consequences, people high in C are a great asset to organizations with this culture. Still, high-C individuals
may encounter difficulties with the hectic pace and immediate results that this environment demands.
© 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in
any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.
10051
Sample Report 9
DiSC®
and Group Culture
DiSC®
Facilitator Report
The “D” Style within your Group
The columns below list the people who scored high in the Dominance style and those who scored low in this
style. Consider how these two groups might misunderstand each other. And if you have a D culture, consider
how those who are low in D may react to that culture.
Note: If the number of group members below exceeds the maximum that can fit, the list will be continued at the end of this report.
High D Low D
Wesley Cref Roger Zieman Carol Counselor
Issues to Consider
If you have a D culture, you may want to think about the following questions:
For group members
How do the low-D’s in your group feel about this culture? What are their frustrations and challenges?
How does the group listen to those with a low-D?
How do the high-D’s in your group respond to those who are low-D’s?
How open is your culture to the i, S, and C styles? How do they bring balance to your group?
Do the high-i’s feel that they get the personal recognition they deserve?
Do the high-S’s feel like they get feedback that is too cold and insensitive?
Do the high-C’s feel that they are given time to think things through and make the right decisions?
For your group as a whole
What are the advantages and drawbacks of the D culture for your group?
How does the D culture support or inhibit the success of your group?
Does your group take the time to calculate risks?
Does the group waste time with power struggles?
Does status get in the way of good decision making?
Does the group attend the emotional and social needs of its members?
© 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in
any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.
10051
Sample Report 10
DiSC®
and Group Culture
DiSC®
Facilitator Report
The “i” Culture
The percentage of your group members (60%) who have high scores on the influencing style is somewhat
higher than the average group taking this online profile (45%). Consider if this style describes your group
culture. The hallmarks of an i culture are an energetic atmosphere, a focus on innovation, and lots of time
spent in meetings or social gatherings. This culture values effective teamwork and creative approaches to
problems. Trust is given to those who are open and expressive. People who excel in this setting tend to be
charismatic individuals with keen social skills. Such an environment is ideal for those who appreciate the power
of collective brainstorming and the potential of fresh concepts. However, those individuals who are not as
people-oriented may be frustrated with the emphasis on group activities and social niceties. In addition, poor
planning and haphazard attention to details can sometimes prevent high-i organizations from actually
implementing any bold ideas.
Rewards: Criticizes:
Creativity Rulemaking
Enthusiasm Caution
Optimism Overanalysis
Collaboration Introversion
Passion Insensitivity
Working in the “i” Culture
The i culture offers benefits and challenges for people with each of the four DiSC®
styles.
High-D individuals
High-D individuals appreciate the fast pace and exciting developments that this culture encourages. Their
eagerness to tackle new challenges keeps the cycle of creativity moving, which inspires their colleagues and
benefits the organization. However, they may grow impatient with prolonged meetings, and the culture’s
emphasis on people’s feelings may strike them as inappropriate or even counterproductive.
High-i individuals
The high-i person will find no better fit than this culture. These individuals thrive on innovative approaches and
constant interaction with peers, both of which are in abundance in this environment. This culture’s priorities suit
these energetic people to such a high degree that their natural zeal propels the organization forward. But flaws
such as disorganization and spotty planning can be magnified when a high-i person is active in this setting.
High-S individuals
People who are high in S respond well to the recognition that they receive in this culture. And although they
may not be the most vocal in group settings, they still like the fact that social graces are held in high regard in
this environment. These individuals focus on steady performance and avoid calling attention to themselves,
which allows the organization to function more effectively. Still, the speed of change in this culture may be too
much for them sometimes, and their need for direction is likely to go unmet.
High-C individuals
High-C individuals gain satisfaction in this culture by embracing the value of their work. In fact, their efforts are
essential to the organization’s structure, because they maintain order in an otherwise frantic environment.
Although they may be seen as cynical, they undertake the research, analysis, and detail-oriented tasks that
others avoid. However, they may become annoyed at the lack of clear guidelines and rules in this culture.
They also may resent the pressure to be extroverted and energetic.
© 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in
any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.
10051
Sample Report 11
DiSC®
and Group Culture
DiSC®
Facilitator Report
The “i” Style within your Group
The columns below list the people who scored high in the Influencing style and those who scored low in this
style. Consider how these two groups might misunderstand each other. And if you have an i culture, consider
how those with who are low in i may react to that culture.
Note: If the number of group members below exceeds the maximum that can fit, the list will be continued at the end of this report.
High i Low i
Carol Counselor Jill Promoter Wesley Cref Cliff Specialist
Roger Zieman
Issues to Consider
If you have an i culture, you may want to think about the following questions:
For group members
How do the low-i’s in your group feel about this culture? What are their frustrations and challenges?
How does the group listen to those with a low-i?
How do the high-i’s in your group respond to those who are low-i’s?
How open is your culture to the D, S, and C styles? How do they bring balance to your group?
Do the high-D’s feel that too much time is wasted socializing?
Do the high-S’s feel like they have enough structure and stability?
Do the high-C’s feel that important details are ignored and analysis is undervalued?
For your group as a whole
What are the advantages and drawbacks of the i culture for your group?
How does the i culture support or inhibit the success of your group?
Does your group waste too much time socializing?
Is your group as organized and efficient as it needs to be?
Does your group follow through on ideas and innovations?
© 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in
any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.
10051
Sample Report 12
DiSC®
and Group Culture
DiSC®
Facilitator Report
The “S” Culture
The percentage of your group members (40%) who have high scores on the Steadiness style is somewhat
higher than the average group taking this online profile (30%). Consider if this style describes your group
culture. The hallmarks of an S culture are stability, predictability, and friendliness. This culture values strong
teamwork and a manageable work-life balance. Trust is given to those who are sincere and considerate.
People who thrive in this setting tend to be polite individuals who avoid conflict and include everyone in the
group’s victories. Such an environment is ideal for those who crave a relaxed, team atmosphere in which to
improve their skills. People in this culture naturally support each other and rely on a systematic approach to
work. However, stagnation is a risk in this culture, and efforts to take the organization to the next level may be
met with hesitation or indecisiveness. In addition, such a culture may lag in innovation or its willingness to take
on bold challenges.
Rewards: Criticizes:
Cooperation Aggressiveness
Loyalty Pushiness
Humility Disruption
Thoughtfulness Rudeness
Team Focus Erratic Behavior
Working in the “S” Culture
The S culture offers benefits and challenges for people with each of the four DiSC®
styles.
High-D individuals
High-D individuals strive to get results in this culture. Their preference for action provokes them to make bold
decisions and take daring risks. Such adventurous behavior can benefit the organization, which otherwise may
struggle to move forward. However, others may regard their assertive behavior as rude or pushy. High-D's, on
the other hand, may feel that the environment is too "touchy-feely." Further, the slow-paced, stable culture
often seems dull to the high-D individual, who may look elsewhere for challenges.
High-i individuals
People high in i supply much of the excitement in this culture. They bring enthusiasm to projects and
coordinate the social activities that bond colleagues. In this way, they build a sense of community. Others,
however, may become frustrated that some high-i's aren't as organized and reliable in their habits. At the
same time, the high-i person is likely to become bored with the laidback atmosphere that this culture
encourages, and they may be overt with their frustrations about this.
High-S individuals
The high-S person appreciates the comforting routine that this culture provides. These individuals respond well
to the security of the environment, and they look forward to the process of collaboration that is a large part of
this culture. The organization comes to depend on their loyalty and ever-increasing knowledge base. However,
the downside is that they tend not to be challenged to improve their performance, accept new responsibilities,
take chances, or make major changes.
High-C individuals
These individuals like the fact that detail-oriented tasks and analytical skills are respected in this culture. They
seldom feel pressure to rush through projects in this environment, and they are pleased that they are allowed
to play to their strengths regularly. In addition, they benefit the organization by ensuring that each concept is as
refined and coherent as possible. However, they may be seen by some as cold. High-C's, in turn, may feel
that the group sacrifices accuracy in its attempt to spare hurt feelings.
© 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in
any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.
10051
Sample Report 13
DiSC®
and Group Culture
DiSC®
Facilitator Report
The “S” Style within your Group
The columns below list the people who scored high in the Steadiness style and those who scored low in this
style. Consider how these two groups might misunderstand each other. And if you have an S culture,
consider how those with who are low in S may react to that culture.
Note: If the number of group members below exceeds the maximum that can fit, the list will be continued at the end of this report.
High S Low S
Carol Counselor Cliff Specialist Wesley Cref Roger Zieman
Issues to Consider
If you have an S culture, you may want to think about the following questions:
For group members
How do the low-S’s in your group feel about this culture? What are their frustrations and challenges?
How does the group listen to those with a low-S?
How do the high-S’s in your group respond to those who are low-S’s?
How open is your culture to the D, i, and C styles? How do they bring balance to your group?
Do the high-D’s feel that the group moves too slowly and that people are too sensitive?
Do the high-i’s feel like they have enough excitement?
Do the high-C’s feel that the group makes decisions based on compassion rather than logic?
For your group as a whole
What are the advantages and drawbacks of the S culture for your group?
How does the S culture support or inhibit the success of your group?
Does your group take enough risks? Does it avoid changes even when they are needed?
Does the group avoid making necessary but tough decisions just because they might upset others?
Does the group hold off from giving difficult feedback to avoid hurting other people’s feelings?
© 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in
any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.
10051
Sample Report 14
DiSC®
and Group Culture
DiSC®
Facilitator Report
The “C” Culture
The percentage of your group members (20%) who have high scores on the Conscientious style is much
lower than the average group taking this online profile (51%). Although very unlikely, consider if this style
describes your group culture. The hallmarks of a C culture are quality, accuracy, and order. Such a culture
values high standards, careful analysis, and diplomacy. This group prides itself on getting perfect results. The
group is cynical toward new ideas and trust usually has to be earned. Members are often loyal but only to
those they respect. The culture values punctual, hardworking, and dependable members. The group,
however, may miss opportunities because it spends so much time researching and analyzing. It may resist
growth for fear of lowering its standards.
Rewards: Criticizes:
Accuracy Mistakes
Completeness Intuitive decision making
Attention to detail Lateness
Punctuality Spotty Research
Dependability Exaggerated Enthusiasm
Working in the “C” Culture
The C culture offers benefits and challenges for people with each of the four DiSC®
styles.
High-D individuals
Double checking and deep analysis will frustrate some high-D individuals. They will be itching to get things
moving, but they will be forced to weigh the pros and cons and calculate risks. On the other hand, they will
know where they stand at all times and may enjoy the task-oriented nature of the group. They may also like
working with people who are willing to adapt and follow their lead.
High-i individuals
Many high-i individuals will get bored with the repetitious assignments and continuous attention to details.
They will need to develop organized, systematic systems for putting their ideas into action. If high-i members
aren't rigorous in their thinking, the group may be critical. Their socializing may be frowned upon, and they
may feel that the culture cares more about the task than it does about its people. On the other hand, their
enthusiasm, optimism, and high energy may be a rare and invaluable asset in this environment.
High-S individuals
High-S people will like the stability of the environment. And without the pressure to be extroverted and
outgoing, they will most likely feel at ease. But because this group often expects people to work alone, some
high-S people may feel lonely. The task-oriented nature of the culture may make them feel that important
emotions or social niceties are ignored or dismissed.
High-C individuals
High-C's usually feel right at home in this environment. They like the reserved, businesslike culture that values
quality and dependability. They enjoy the group's systematic approach and the lack of direct conflict. They
may, however, feed into an overly analytic culture that doesn't take chances and resists change.
© 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in
any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.
10051
Sample Report 15
DiSC®
and Group Culture
DiSC®
Facilitator Report
The “C” Style within your Group
The columns below list the people who scored high in the Conscientious style and those who scored low in this
style. Consider how these two groups might misunderstand each other. And if you have a C culture, consider
how those with who are low in C may react to that culture.
Note: If the number of group members below exceeds the maximum that can fit, the list will be continued at the end of this report.
High C Low C
Wesley Cref Carol Counselor Jill Promoter
Roger Zieman
Issues to Consider
If you have a C culture, you may want to think about the following questions:
For group members
How do the low-C’s in your group feel about this culture? What are their frustrations and challenges?
How does the group listen to those with a low-C?
How do the high-C’s in your group respond to those who are low-C’s?
How open is your culture to the D, i, and S styles? How do they bring balance to your group?
Do the high-D’s feel stifled by the slow pace of the group?
Do the high-i’s feel bored or bogged down in details?
Do the high-S’s feel isolated and socially unconnected?
For your group as a whole
What are the advantages and drawbacks of the C culture for your group?
How does the C culture support or inhibit the success of your group?
Does your group take enough risks?
Does the group spend too much time ensuring accuracy when it should be acting?
Does the group attend to the emotional and social needs of its members?
© 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in
any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.
10051
Sample Report 16
Individual Data Table
DiSC®
Facilitator Report
Individual Data Table
For each group member, the table below lists his/her primary DiSC®
style(s), secondary style(s), Classical
Pattern, and segment numbers. Names are grouped by primary DiSC style.
Group
Member
Primary DiSC
Style(s)
Secondary DiSC
Style(s)
Classical
Pattern
Segment
Numbers
Roger Zieman I d Persuader 5731
Carol Counselor I s Counselor 2753
Jill Promoter I Promoter 4741
Cliff Specialist S Specialist 4264
Wesley Cref C D Creative 6126
A DiSC style is considered secondary if it has a segment score of 5, 6, or 7, but is not the highest DiSC segment score.
© 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in
any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.
10051
Sample Report 17
D i
C S
Group Reference
DiSC®
Facilitator Report
DiSC®
Styles
The box below shows the percentage of your group receiving their highest segment scores in each DiSC®
quadrant. Note that individuals can have two or more scores that tie for highest.
20% of the group
Wesley Cref
60% of the group
Carol Counselor Jill Promoter
Roger Zieman
20% of the group
Wesley Cref
20% of the group
Cliff Specialist

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Free DiSC Classic Facilitator Report | Strengthscape

  • 1. Classic Facilitator Report Sample Report (5 People) Saturday, October 12, 2013 This report is provided by: Strengthscape D 303 SJR Equinox Electronic City Phase 1 Bangalore 560 100 India Contact: +91 80 88 877 877 www.strengthscape.com
  • 2. © 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited. 10051 Sample Report 2 Overview DiSC® Facilitator Report Overview of the DiSC® Facilitator Report For more than 30 years, DiSC® has helped people improve performance, deal more effectively with conflict, and value differences. DiSC recognizes that the first step toward change is understanding why we act the way we do. This facilitator report is designed to help you better understand the diversity of interpersonal styles within your group so that you can help participants use their DiSC knowledge most effectively. DiSC can be used in a variety of contexts to help deliver different insights and benefits. The tool is most frequently used to help individuals and groups Understand their preferences, strengths, and growth areas Appreciate personal diversity Develop a common language to discuss personal styles Create a dialogue about personal preferences, frustrations, and differences Relate to those around them This facilitator report provides a wide range of information about your group. Use the table of contents below to determine what information best suits the purpose of your intervention and your facilitation style and strategy. Page 3 Breakdown by DiSC Quadrant shows the percentage of people who receive high, moderate, or low scores in each of the DiSC styles. Each quadrant also displays the percentage of people who received that style as their primary or secondary style. Page 4 DiSC Styles Distribution displays the percentage of people who received high, moderate, or low scores in each of the DiSC styles. This section also allows you to compare your group distribution in the four styles against the general reference data. Page 5 Classical Pattern Distribution lists the number and percentage of people who received each Classical Pattern. Reference data is also provided as a point of comparison. Page 6 DiSC and Group Culture provides an overview of each DiSC style as it relates to group culture. This section describes how you read your DiSC culture and helps facilitators understand the challenges and frustrations that individuals within that culture may face. Page 16 Individual Data Table lists each individual, his/her primary DiSC style(s), secondary DiSC style(s), Classical Pattern, and segment numbers. Names are organized by highest DiSC style. For smaller groups, the end of this report contains a bonus reference page that shows the DiSC quadrants and lists members who had their highest DiSC score in each quadrant. This page will not be generated if there are too many people to fit into a single quadrant (i.e., more than 40 people in a single DiSC quadrant).
  • 3. © 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited. 10051 Sample Report 3 DiSC® Styles DiSC® Facilitator Report Group Size: 5 Breakdown by DiSC® Quadrant The DiSC® quadrants in the box below show the percentage of people who received high scores in the D, i, S, or C styles. A score is considered high if it is in segments 5, 6, or 7. Note that individuals can have high scores in more than one style, and consequently these percentages will sum to over 100%. At the bottom of each quadrant, percentages indicate how many people have each DiSC style as their primary or secondary style. A DiSC style is considered primary if it has the highest DiSC segment score for that individual (or tied for highest). A DiSC style is considered secondary if it has a segment score of 5, 6, or 7, but is not the highest DiSC segment score. Note that a person can have several primary or secondary styles. Active/Fast Pace enjoys a faster pace that is bold, assertive, and dynamic 80% Questioning/ Logic Focus on reason, ideas, or, facts 40% D 40% High 20% Primary 20% Secondary i 60% High 60% Primary 0% Secondary C 20% High 20% Primary 0% Secondary S 40% High 20% Primary 20% Secondary Accepting/ People Focus on relationships or feelings 80% Thoughtful/Moderate Pace enjoys a moderate pace that is systematic, calm, and careful 60% The right and left sides of the box above show the percentage of people who scored on a DiSC style with either a Questioning/Logic Focus (people with a high D and/or high C) or Accepting/People Focus (people with a high I and/or high S). The top and bottom of the box above show the number of people who scored high on a DiSC style with either an Active/Fast Pace (people with a high D and/or high I) or Thoughtful/Moderate Pace (people with a high C and/or high S). Note that an individual can be classified in both the Questioning/ Logic Focus and the Accepting/People Focus categories, as well as in both the Active/Fast Pace and the Thoughtful/Moderate Pace categories. NOTE: Because group members can be classified in more than one category, the percentages here will almost always sum above 100%
  • 4. © 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited. 10051 Sample Report 4 DiSC® Styles DiSC® Facilitator Report Group Size: 5 DiSC® Styles Distribution The table below shows the percentage of individuals in each score category (i.e., high, medium, or low) for each DiSC® style. This table also shows the percentages of people who received each DiSC style as their primary or secondary style. D i S C High Score 40% 60% 40% 20% Primary 20% 60% 20% 20% Secondary 20% 0% 20% 0% Moderate Score 40% 0% 20% 20% Low Score 20% 40% 40% 60% A score is considered high if it is in segments 5, 6, or 7; moderate if it is in segment 4; and low if it is in segments 1, 2, or 3. A high DiSC score is considered primary if it is the highest DiSC segment score for that individual (or tied for highest). A DiSC style is considered secondary if it has a segment score of 5, 6, or 7, but is not the highest DiSC segment score. Note that a person can have two primary or secondary styles. Comparison with the general reference group The bar graphs below allow you to compare your group with the general reference group. The height of bars indicates the percentage of people who received high scores in each DiSC style. The darker bar represents your group, and the lighter bar represents the general reference group, which includes DiSC data from over 20,000 respondents.* * This reference group data is provided so that you can compare your group to others who have taken the DiSC online assessment. Note that compared to the general population, this sample contains a large number of managers and professionals. See the text on the bottom of the next page for information about using reference group data and making comparisons. The next page also describes the demographic characteristics of the sample. Percentageofpeople receivinghighscores 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% D i S C Your group The general reference group
  • 5. © 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited. 10051 Sample Report 5 Classical Patterns DiSC® Facilitator Report Classical Pattern Distribution The table below lists the number and percentage of people who received each Classical Pattern. Note that the “% within reference group” column reflects reference data from over 20,000 men and women who have previously taken the online assessment*t . Classical Patterns # of people % of group % within reference group*t DC Creative 1 20% 18% I Promoter 1 20% 8% Is Counselor 1 20% 5% Id Persuader 1 20% 5% S Specialist 1 20% 2% SC Perfectionist 0 0% 16% DI Inspirational 0 0% 11% Di Result-Oriented 0 0% 8% D Developer 0 0% 7% C Objective Thinker 0 0% 7% Cis Practitioner 0 0% 5% Ic Appraiser 0 0% 4% Si Agent 0 0% 2% Sd Achiever 0 0% 1% Sdc Investigator 0 0% 1% Total 5 t The reference group data is presented in this report so that you can compare your group to other people who have taken the DiSC online assessment. The reference sample was gathered from a sample of over 20,000 men and women who have taken the online profile for a variety of different purposes. The distribution of race in this sample was 12% African American, 5% Asian American, 75% Caucasian, 7% Hispanic, and 2% Native American. Gender was equally distributed and all individuals in the sample were above the age of 18. Note that compared to the general population, this sample contains a large number of managers and professionals. * Note that there are many reasons why your group's percentages could be different from the reference group data. First, the reference group is composed of people who have taken the online version of DiSC. Because this sample contains a large number of managers and people within professional fields, groups that work outside these areas sometimes see a different pattern of DiSC scores within their group. In addition, your group's selection methods may systematically prefer some styles over others. Or the nature of the work that your group does may attract certain styles. As well, the culture of the group may shape behavioral styles. Many differences will also be due to pure chance, especially if your group is small. Only in very large groups would we expect a group's percentages to closely match the reference group's percentages. Consequently, facilitators should only pay attention to those differences that are sizable.
  • 6. © 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited. 10051 Sample Report 6 DiSC® and Group Culture DiSC® Facilitator Report DiSC® and Group Culture Just as individuals have unique styles, groups also tend to develop their own unique styles or cultures. This culture is an informal combination of behaviors, values, and attitudes that most people in the group take for granted. Put in the simplest terms, culture is “the way we do things.” Although not everybody agrees with or flows with the culture, most group members feel the pressure that a culture exerts to act in a certain way. DiSC® does not address all elements of culture, but it helps you understand many important needs, goals, fears, emotions, and behaviors within your culture. Why is group culture important? Group culture has a large impact on the behavior, attitudes, and satisfaction of each group member. People who fit into the culture often feel right at home in the group. But for other people, the culture leads them to feel like strangers in a strange land. The environment makes them uncomfortable. Culture also has implications for the group as a whole. It affects such things as the pace at which work gets done, how outsiders are treated, the attention paid to details, or risks that the group takes. These in turn influence the success of the group in meeting its goals. Where does group culture come from? Group culture is not simply the average of all the people in the group. A number of different factors determine group culture, such as: The style of the group leaders The most pronounced styles within the group The type of work the group does The historical culture of the group The cohesion or tension within the group The goals and mission that the group faces These are just some of the factors that help shape group culture. Understanding the origins of your culture may be important if you hope to change it.
  • 7. © 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited. 10051 Sample Report 7 DiSC® and Group Culture DiSC® Facilitator Report Your DiSC® Culture How do I know my group’s DiSC culture? Just as you can learn to read individuals’ styles, you can also learn to read the DiSC® style of a group. Does your group culture have a thoughtful, careful, and moderate pace (S and C styles) or does it have active, assertive, fast pace (D and i styles)? Consider that 80% of your group members enjoy an active/fast pace and 60% enjoy a thoughtful/moderate pace. Does your group culture have more of a questioning orientation (C and D styles) or an accepting orientation (i and S styles)? Consider that 40% of your group members tend to be questioning, placing a high priority on concerns like logic and objectivity and 80% tend to be accepting, placing a high priority on concerns like relationships and feelings. As you examine the graphs above, consider the following points: The pace of your group members is more active than thoughtful. The group probably contains a number of assertive people who are quick decision makers. This often creates a dynamic and fast- paced culture. Consider if this sets the pace for the rest of the group. Most of your group members have a tendency to be more accepting and agreeable than questioning and skeptical. These are people who probably prioritize empathy and personal feelings over logic and objectivity. This often contributes to a warm and inviting culture that might come across as a little too "touchy-feely" for some high C and high D individuals. Consider if this describes your group culture. Other considerations You also may want to think about what is important to your group. What behaviors does it reward and what behaviors does it criticize? The following pages describe each of the four DiSC cultures. Read through these descriptions and decide which ones, if any, describe your group. Some groups find that a blend of two DiSC styles describes their culture best. On the other hand, some groups find that none of the DiSC styles really describe their culture. Or even beyond this, some groups find that there are important subgroups that each have their own DiSC culture. The following information on group culture is designed to help you understand some of the challenges and frustrations that your group members might face. As well, this will help you recognize their unique contributions, particularly those who differ from the dominant culture. Finally, understanding culture will allow you to understand some of the difficulties with which your group might struggle. Percentageofpeoplein eachcategoryhighscore 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Questioning/ Logic Focus Accepting/ People Focus 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Active/Fast- Paced Thoughtful/ Moderate-Paced
  • 8. © 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited. 10051 Sample Report 8 DiSC® and Group Culture DiSC® Facilitator Report The “D” Culture The percentage of your group members (40%) who have high scores on the Dominance style is somewhat lower than the average group taking this online profile (53%). Although unlikely, consider if this style describes your group culture. The hallmarks of a D culture are quick decisions, direct answers, and a competitive atmosphere. This culture values solid results and powerful growth. Trust is given to those who are direct and straightforward. People who thrive in this setting tend to be hard-driving individuals who relish challenges and the thrill of victory. Such an environment is ideal for those who wish to climb the corporate ladder and achieve success. Interpersonal communication, however, may suffer in this culture, and those who are less assertive may feel overwhelmed. In addition, such a culture may struggle with high turnover and a stressful environment. Rewards: Criticizes: Independence Hesitation Decisiveness Overanalysis Directness Foot-dragging Victory Over-sensitivity Results Weakness Working in the “D” Culture The D culture offers benefits and challenges for people with each of the four DiSC® styles. High-D individuals High-D individuals embrace this culture’s aggressive pace. They see the environment as ideal for achieving their goals and moving their careers forward. Their desire to win every encounter is based not only on what they believe is best for themselves, but for the organization as well. In this way, their determination earns them the respect of their colleagues, who may look to them for leadership. However, their assertiveness makes them prime for conflicts with peers, especially those who share their high-D tendencies. High-i individuals People who are high in i appreciate the speed with which their ideas are implemented and the enthusiasm that the environment cultivates. In addition, their energetic approach to projects is a great benefit to the organization. The organization, however, may not be as exuberant in recognizing their great work as the high-i would like. High-S individuals High-S people often find a niche as a sympathetic ear among the hard-charging negotiations and constant striving of this culture. These individuals help the organization by applying their people skills whenever they can. … However, they may often feel hurt and stressed in a setting that they believe is cold and harsh. Further, they may feel that their ideas get overrun by those they see as more aggressive and pushy. Finally, the frequent sense of urgency in this culture may upset their preference for a systematic and predictable approach to problem solving. High-C individuals These individuals like that business is at the forefront in this culture. They are pleased that achieving goals is a top priority and that time is not spent on small talk. With their dedication to resolving the details and analyzing the consequences, people high in C are a great asset to organizations with this culture. Still, high-C individuals may encounter difficulties with the hectic pace and immediate results that this environment demands.
  • 9. © 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited. 10051 Sample Report 9 DiSC® and Group Culture DiSC® Facilitator Report The “D” Style within your Group The columns below list the people who scored high in the Dominance style and those who scored low in this style. Consider how these two groups might misunderstand each other. And if you have a D culture, consider how those who are low in D may react to that culture. Note: If the number of group members below exceeds the maximum that can fit, the list will be continued at the end of this report. High D Low D Wesley Cref Roger Zieman Carol Counselor Issues to Consider If you have a D culture, you may want to think about the following questions: For group members How do the low-D’s in your group feel about this culture? What are their frustrations and challenges? How does the group listen to those with a low-D? How do the high-D’s in your group respond to those who are low-D’s? How open is your culture to the i, S, and C styles? How do they bring balance to your group? Do the high-i’s feel that they get the personal recognition they deserve? Do the high-S’s feel like they get feedback that is too cold and insensitive? Do the high-C’s feel that they are given time to think things through and make the right decisions? For your group as a whole What are the advantages and drawbacks of the D culture for your group? How does the D culture support or inhibit the success of your group? Does your group take the time to calculate risks? Does the group waste time with power struggles? Does status get in the way of good decision making? Does the group attend the emotional and social needs of its members?
  • 10. © 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited. 10051 Sample Report 10 DiSC® and Group Culture DiSC® Facilitator Report The “i” Culture The percentage of your group members (60%) who have high scores on the influencing style is somewhat higher than the average group taking this online profile (45%). Consider if this style describes your group culture. The hallmarks of an i culture are an energetic atmosphere, a focus on innovation, and lots of time spent in meetings or social gatherings. This culture values effective teamwork and creative approaches to problems. Trust is given to those who are open and expressive. People who excel in this setting tend to be charismatic individuals with keen social skills. Such an environment is ideal for those who appreciate the power of collective brainstorming and the potential of fresh concepts. However, those individuals who are not as people-oriented may be frustrated with the emphasis on group activities and social niceties. In addition, poor planning and haphazard attention to details can sometimes prevent high-i organizations from actually implementing any bold ideas. Rewards: Criticizes: Creativity Rulemaking Enthusiasm Caution Optimism Overanalysis Collaboration Introversion Passion Insensitivity Working in the “i” Culture The i culture offers benefits and challenges for people with each of the four DiSC® styles. High-D individuals High-D individuals appreciate the fast pace and exciting developments that this culture encourages. Their eagerness to tackle new challenges keeps the cycle of creativity moving, which inspires their colleagues and benefits the organization. However, they may grow impatient with prolonged meetings, and the culture’s emphasis on people’s feelings may strike them as inappropriate or even counterproductive. High-i individuals The high-i person will find no better fit than this culture. These individuals thrive on innovative approaches and constant interaction with peers, both of which are in abundance in this environment. This culture’s priorities suit these energetic people to such a high degree that their natural zeal propels the organization forward. But flaws such as disorganization and spotty planning can be magnified when a high-i person is active in this setting. High-S individuals People who are high in S respond well to the recognition that they receive in this culture. And although they may not be the most vocal in group settings, they still like the fact that social graces are held in high regard in this environment. These individuals focus on steady performance and avoid calling attention to themselves, which allows the organization to function more effectively. Still, the speed of change in this culture may be too much for them sometimes, and their need for direction is likely to go unmet. High-C individuals High-C individuals gain satisfaction in this culture by embracing the value of their work. In fact, their efforts are essential to the organization’s structure, because they maintain order in an otherwise frantic environment. Although they may be seen as cynical, they undertake the research, analysis, and detail-oriented tasks that others avoid. However, they may become annoyed at the lack of clear guidelines and rules in this culture. They also may resent the pressure to be extroverted and energetic.
  • 11. © 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited. 10051 Sample Report 11 DiSC® and Group Culture DiSC® Facilitator Report The “i” Style within your Group The columns below list the people who scored high in the Influencing style and those who scored low in this style. Consider how these two groups might misunderstand each other. And if you have an i culture, consider how those with who are low in i may react to that culture. Note: If the number of group members below exceeds the maximum that can fit, the list will be continued at the end of this report. High i Low i Carol Counselor Jill Promoter Wesley Cref Cliff Specialist Roger Zieman Issues to Consider If you have an i culture, you may want to think about the following questions: For group members How do the low-i’s in your group feel about this culture? What are their frustrations and challenges? How does the group listen to those with a low-i? How do the high-i’s in your group respond to those who are low-i’s? How open is your culture to the D, S, and C styles? How do they bring balance to your group? Do the high-D’s feel that too much time is wasted socializing? Do the high-S’s feel like they have enough structure and stability? Do the high-C’s feel that important details are ignored and analysis is undervalued? For your group as a whole What are the advantages and drawbacks of the i culture for your group? How does the i culture support or inhibit the success of your group? Does your group waste too much time socializing? Is your group as organized and efficient as it needs to be? Does your group follow through on ideas and innovations?
  • 12. © 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited. 10051 Sample Report 12 DiSC® and Group Culture DiSC® Facilitator Report The “S” Culture The percentage of your group members (40%) who have high scores on the Steadiness style is somewhat higher than the average group taking this online profile (30%). Consider if this style describes your group culture. The hallmarks of an S culture are stability, predictability, and friendliness. This culture values strong teamwork and a manageable work-life balance. Trust is given to those who are sincere and considerate. People who thrive in this setting tend to be polite individuals who avoid conflict and include everyone in the group’s victories. Such an environment is ideal for those who crave a relaxed, team atmosphere in which to improve their skills. People in this culture naturally support each other and rely on a systematic approach to work. However, stagnation is a risk in this culture, and efforts to take the organization to the next level may be met with hesitation or indecisiveness. In addition, such a culture may lag in innovation or its willingness to take on bold challenges. Rewards: Criticizes: Cooperation Aggressiveness Loyalty Pushiness Humility Disruption Thoughtfulness Rudeness Team Focus Erratic Behavior Working in the “S” Culture The S culture offers benefits and challenges for people with each of the four DiSC® styles. High-D individuals High-D individuals strive to get results in this culture. Their preference for action provokes them to make bold decisions and take daring risks. Such adventurous behavior can benefit the organization, which otherwise may struggle to move forward. However, others may regard their assertive behavior as rude or pushy. High-D's, on the other hand, may feel that the environment is too "touchy-feely." Further, the slow-paced, stable culture often seems dull to the high-D individual, who may look elsewhere for challenges. High-i individuals People high in i supply much of the excitement in this culture. They bring enthusiasm to projects and coordinate the social activities that bond colleagues. In this way, they build a sense of community. Others, however, may become frustrated that some high-i's aren't as organized and reliable in their habits. At the same time, the high-i person is likely to become bored with the laidback atmosphere that this culture encourages, and they may be overt with their frustrations about this. High-S individuals The high-S person appreciates the comforting routine that this culture provides. These individuals respond well to the security of the environment, and they look forward to the process of collaboration that is a large part of this culture. The organization comes to depend on their loyalty and ever-increasing knowledge base. However, the downside is that they tend not to be challenged to improve their performance, accept new responsibilities, take chances, or make major changes. High-C individuals These individuals like the fact that detail-oriented tasks and analytical skills are respected in this culture. They seldom feel pressure to rush through projects in this environment, and they are pleased that they are allowed to play to their strengths regularly. In addition, they benefit the organization by ensuring that each concept is as refined and coherent as possible. However, they may be seen by some as cold. High-C's, in turn, may feel that the group sacrifices accuracy in its attempt to spare hurt feelings.
  • 13. © 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited. 10051 Sample Report 13 DiSC® and Group Culture DiSC® Facilitator Report The “S” Style within your Group The columns below list the people who scored high in the Steadiness style and those who scored low in this style. Consider how these two groups might misunderstand each other. And if you have an S culture, consider how those with who are low in S may react to that culture. Note: If the number of group members below exceeds the maximum that can fit, the list will be continued at the end of this report. High S Low S Carol Counselor Cliff Specialist Wesley Cref Roger Zieman Issues to Consider If you have an S culture, you may want to think about the following questions: For group members How do the low-S’s in your group feel about this culture? What are their frustrations and challenges? How does the group listen to those with a low-S? How do the high-S’s in your group respond to those who are low-S’s? How open is your culture to the D, i, and C styles? How do they bring balance to your group? Do the high-D’s feel that the group moves too slowly and that people are too sensitive? Do the high-i’s feel like they have enough excitement? Do the high-C’s feel that the group makes decisions based on compassion rather than logic? For your group as a whole What are the advantages and drawbacks of the S culture for your group? How does the S culture support or inhibit the success of your group? Does your group take enough risks? Does it avoid changes even when they are needed? Does the group avoid making necessary but tough decisions just because they might upset others? Does the group hold off from giving difficult feedback to avoid hurting other people’s feelings?
  • 14. © 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited. 10051 Sample Report 14 DiSC® and Group Culture DiSC® Facilitator Report The “C” Culture The percentage of your group members (20%) who have high scores on the Conscientious style is much lower than the average group taking this online profile (51%). Although very unlikely, consider if this style describes your group culture. The hallmarks of a C culture are quality, accuracy, and order. Such a culture values high standards, careful analysis, and diplomacy. This group prides itself on getting perfect results. The group is cynical toward new ideas and trust usually has to be earned. Members are often loyal but only to those they respect. The culture values punctual, hardworking, and dependable members. The group, however, may miss opportunities because it spends so much time researching and analyzing. It may resist growth for fear of lowering its standards. Rewards: Criticizes: Accuracy Mistakes Completeness Intuitive decision making Attention to detail Lateness Punctuality Spotty Research Dependability Exaggerated Enthusiasm Working in the “C” Culture The C culture offers benefits and challenges for people with each of the four DiSC® styles. High-D individuals Double checking and deep analysis will frustrate some high-D individuals. They will be itching to get things moving, but they will be forced to weigh the pros and cons and calculate risks. On the other hand, they will know where they stand at all times and may enjoy the task-oriented nature of the group. They may also like working with people who are willing to adapt and follow their lead. High-i individuals Many high-i individuals will get bored with the repetitious assignments and continuous attention to details. They will need to develop organized, systematic systems for putting their ideas into action. If high-i members aren't rigorous in their thinking, the group may be critical. Their socializing may be frowned upon, and they may feel that the culture cares more about the task than it does about its people. On the other hand, their enthusiasm, optimism, and high energy may be a rare and invaluable asset in this environment. High-S individuals High-S people will like the stability of the environment. And without the pressure to be extroverted and outgoing, they will most likely feel at ease. But because this group often expects people to work alone, some high-S people may feel lonely. The task-oriented nature of the culture may make them feel that important emotions or social niceties are ignored or dismissed. High-C individuals High-C's usually feel right at home in this environment. They like the reserved, businesslike culture that values quality and dependability. They enjoy the group's systematic approach and the lack of direct conflict. They may, however, feed into an overly analytic culture that doesn't take chances and resists change.
  • 15. © 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited. 10051 Sample Report 15 DiSC® and Group Culture DiSC® Facilitator Report The “C” Style within your Group The columns below list the people who scored high in the Conscientious style and those who scored low in this style. Consider how these two groups might misunderstand each other. And if you have a C culture, consider how those with who are low in C may react to that culture. Note: If the number of group members below exceeds the maximum that can fit, the list will be continued at the end of this report. High C Low C Wesley Cref Carol Counselor Jill Promoter Roger Zieman Issues to Consider If you have a C culture, you may want to think about the following questions: For group members How do the low-C’s in your group feel about this culture? What are their frustrations and challenges? How does the group listen to those with a low-C? How do the high-C’s in your group respond to those who are low-C’s? How open is your culture to the D, i, and S styles? How do they bring balance to your group? Do the high-D’s feel stifled by the slow pace of the group? Do the high-i’s feel bored or bogged down in details? Do the high-S’s feel isolated and socially unconnected? For your group as a whole What are the advantages and drawbacks of the C culture for your group? How does the C culture support or inhibit the success of your group? Does your group take enough risks? Does the group spend too much time ensuring accuracy when it should be acting? Does the group attend to the emotional and social needs of its members?
  • 16. © 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited. 10051 Sample Report 16 Individual Data Table DiSC® Facilitator Report Individual Data Table For each group member, the table below lists his/her primary DiSC® style(s), secondary style(s), Classical Pattern, and segment numbers. Names are grouped by primary DiSC style. Group Member Primary DiSC Style(s) Secondary DiSC Style(s) Classical Pattern Segment Numbers Roger Zieman I d Persuader 5731 Carol Counselor I s Counselor 2753 Jill Promoter I Promoter 4741 Cliff Specialist S Specialist 4264 Wesley Cref C D Creative 6126 A DiSC style is considered secondary if it has a segment score of 5, 6, or 7, but is not the highest DiSC segment score.
  • 17. © 2004 by Inscape Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited. 10051 Sample Report 17 D i C S Group Reference DiSC® Facilitator Report DiSC® Styles The box below shows the percentage of your group receiving their highest segment scores in each DiSC® quadrant. Note that individuals can have two or more scores that tie for highest. 20% of the group Wesley Cref 60% of the group Carol Counselor Jill Promoter Roger Zieman 20% of the group Wesley Cref 20% of the group Cliff Specialist