Evidence Based Learning

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Presentation at 2011 Lilly Conference on College and University Teaching

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Evidence Based Learning

  1. 1. Joe Eshleman, MLIS, Instruction Librarian Johnson & Wales University Library, Charlotte, NC Richard Moniz, MA, MLIS, EdD, Director of Library Services Johnson & Wales University Library, Charlotte, NC Adjunct Instructor, UNCG MLIS & Johnson & Wales University, History Evidence-based Learning and Information Literacy : Actively Emphasizing the Evaluation of Sources to Enhance Student Work FEBRUARY 4, 2011
  2. 2. Johnson & Wales University <ul><li>Founded as a business college in 1914 in Providence, RI </li></ul><ul><li>Not-for-profit, private institution </li></ul><ul><li>Colleges of Business, Hospitality, and Culinary Arts supported by School of Arts & Sciences </li></ul><ul><li>Four Campuses: Providence, RI; Charlotte, NC; Miami, FL; Denver, CO </li></ul><ul><li>Approximately 2,600 students at our Charlotte campus (opened in 2004) </li></ul><ul><li>Co-Sponsor of the Lilly conference </li></ul>
  3. 3. Session Objectives <ul><li>What’s the problem? </li></ul><ul><li>Share our experience and findings regarding student exercises with source evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss how you can implement our findings in your class </li></ul>
  4. 4. What’s the problem?
  5. 5. Works Cited Page Example <ul><li>“ Vaccinations.&quot; Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia . 29 Nov. 2005. Wikipedia. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/vaccinations>. </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;History of Vaccinations.&quot; Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia . 30 Nov.2005.Wikipedia.<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/history%20%of%20%vaccinations%20%>. </li></ul><ul><li>“ The problem with vaccines.&quot; ehow website . 15 Nov. 2005 <http://ehow.com/vaccine_problem.doc>. </li></ul>
  6. 6. “ Eight out of ten (81%) students considered themselves expert or very skilled in searching the Internet effectively and efficiently.” How Students View their Own Technology Adoption and Information Literacy The ECAR ( EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research) Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2010
  7. 7. Information Literacy: Evaluating Information
  8. 8. Video from class
  9. 9. Accuracy Is the information free of errors and do you see that the information is cited? Authority Is there a way for you to tell who created this information? Can you contact the person? Currency When was this information created? Is there more current information available for your topic? Objectivity How would you define the purpose for the creation of this information? Do you think the author has any biases? What would they be? Relevance Is the information you found the best match-up for your information need? Why? What are we doing to give the students the tools they need to evaluate sources?
  10. 10. What are we doing to give each student the tools they need to evaluate sources? <ul><li>Individual evaluation assignment </li></ul><ul><li>Librarian provides formative assessment and feedback directly to the students </li></ul>In this assignment you are required to write a paper on a topic which presents itself as a having scientific evidence but which may need further investigation. Is there any SCIENTIFIC evidence supporting or refuting this material? As part of your research, you will need two sources to support the information you present. You will need to e-mail one of the resources (or a link to it) plus the following evaluation information to the Instruction Librarian.
  11. 11. *Primary versus Secondary Source? Why? *Primary versus Secondary Source? Why? Accuracy Is the information free of errors and do you see that the information is cited? Authority Is there a way for you to tell who created this information? Can you contact the person? Currency When was this information created? Is there more current information available for your topic? How does currency apply to primary sources? Objectivity How would you define the purpose for the creation of this information? Do you think the author has any biases? What would they be? How does objectivity apply when viewing historical events from primary sources? Relevance Is the information you found the best match-up for your information need? Why? How can instructors help students to evaluate sources?-History Class Example
  12. 12. *Primary versus Secondary Source? Why? *A well researched business plan Accuracy Is your information free of errors and is your information cited? Authority Is there a way for you to show that you created this information? Did you supply contact information? Currency When was this information created? Is there more current information available for your topic? How does currency apply to business plans? Objectivity How would you define the purpose for the creation of this information? Do you have any biases? What would they be? Relevance Is the information you are creating the best match-up for your audience’s information need? Why? How can instructors help students to evaluate sources?-Business Class Example
  13. 13. Instructor (Brian Mooney) Feedback &quot;After this instruction and exercise, students demonstrated overall a more critical attitude. It was brought home to them that they needed to become skeptical consumers in an age of abundant, readily-accessible information.&quot;
  14. 14. Student Feedback Thank you! You really taught me something. Before the presentation and this assignment I didn't know what to look for when evaluating a website. Thank you for your constructive criticism. Thank you for taking the time to do this and for the information about the sources Thank you so so so very much for explaining to me how to do the sourcing. I will gladly email you if I need anymore help with the paper.
  15. 15. Theory <ul><li>Lev Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development: </li></ul><ul><li>“… defined as including higher cognitive functions that are about to mature or develop, the ZPD is determined by the cognitive tasks the learner can complete in collaboration with an adult ...” (Gredler, 2002, p. 2660) </li></ul>
  16. 16. Individual Student Feedback
  17. 17. ACRL Standards <ul><li>“The information literate student evaluates information and its sources critically and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge base and value system.” </li></ul><ul><li>– Association of College & Research Libraries Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education </li></ul>
  18. 18. NEASC Standards <ul><li>“The institution ensures that students use information resources and information technology as an integral part of their education. The institution provides appropriate orientation and training for use of these resources, as well as instruction and support in information literacy and information technology appropriate to the degree level and field of study.” </li></ul><ul><li>- New England Association of Schools & Colleges Commission on Institutions of Higher Education (SACS equivalent) </li></ul>
  19. 19. What have we done in the past to address the problem (other ways to integrate this into your class)? <ul><li>Group Exercises </li></ul><ul><li>Clickers (individual) </li></ul><ul><li>Clickers (game show) </li></ul>
  20. 20. Reflection <ul><li>Questions? Other Ideas/Thoughts? </li></ul>
  21. 21. References/Suggested Readings Association of College & Research Libraries. (2000). Information literacy competency standards for higher education , Retrieved December 2, 2010, from http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlstandards/informationliteracycompetency.htm. Beck, S. E. (1997). The good, the bad, and the ugly: Or, why it’s a good idea to evaluate web sources. Retrieved December 15, 2010, from http://lib.nmsu.edu/instruction/eval.html. Burkhardt, J., MacDonald, M. C., and Rathemacher, A. J. (2010). Teaching information literacy: 50 standards-based exercises for college students . Chicago: ALA. Gredler, M. E. (2002). Vygotsky, Lev (1896–1934). Encyclopedia of Education . New York: Macmillan Reference USA. Jackson, B., & Jamieson, K. Unspun: Finding facts in a world of disinformation . New York: Random House, 2007. Kapoun, J. (1998). Teaching undergrads WEB evaluation: A guide for library instruction. C & RL News, 59 (7). Kolowich, S. (September 29, 2010). Searching for better research habits. Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved December 15, 2010, from http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2010/09/29/search. Kortum P., Edwards, C., & Richards-Kortum, R. (2008). The impact of inaccurate Internet health information in a secondary school learning environment. Journal of Medical Internet Research , 10(2), e17. Lesley University. (2005). Evaluating web sites: Criteria for the classroom. Retrieved December 15, 2010, from http://www.lesley.edu/library/guides/research/evaluating_web.html. Moniz, R., Eshleman, J., Mooney, B., Jewell, D., & Tran, C. (2010). The impact of information literacy-related instruction in the science classroom: Clickers versus nonclickers. College & Undergraduate Libraries, 17 (4), 349-364. New England Association of Schools and Colleges. (2010). Commission on Institutions of Higher Education: Standards of Accreditation . Retrieved December 2, 2010, from http://cihe.neasc.org/standards_policies/standards/standards_html_version New York University Libraries. Nursing resources: A self-paced tutorial and refresher. Retrieved December 15, 2010, from http://library.nyu.edu/research/subjects/health/tutorial/index.html. Sittler, R. L. and Cook, D. (Eds.) (2009). The library instruction cookbook . Chicago: ACRL.

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