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Tranquilty Over Tubulence

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Many different styles and frameworks of Agile Software Development have been developed since The Agile Manifesto was written. A prevailing goal across the alternatives is to promote peace of mind for customers, users, and the development team. Unfortunately, it is all too common for Agile teams to experience turbulence rather than tranquility.

Seven guiding principles that promote peace of mind are presented. These principles provide a framework for discovering new processes and practices that will improve team productivity, communication, and performance. The goal for practitioners is to find, identify, and implement practices that work in their environment and make people awesome.

Published in: Technology
  • Rob is a dynamic speaker. I had the benefit of attending his session at the 2019 Path to Agility conference.
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Tranquilty Over Tubulence

  1. 1. Tranquility Over Turbulence Rob Keefer @rbkeefer
  2. 2. @rbkeefer Developer User Advocate Data Scientist Craft Solid Software Make People Awesome Follow a Process
  3. 3. @rbkeefer Optimal Experience
  4. 4. @rbkeefer Optimal Experience Challenges Skills
  5. 5. @rbkeefer Optimal Experience Challenges Skills Anxiety Boredom Worry Apathy
  6. 6. @rbkeefer Optimal Experience Challenges Skills FLOW Anxiety Boredom Worry Apathy
  7. 7. @rbkeefer Optimal Experience “Assembly of Japanese bicycle require great peace of mind.” ~ Robert Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
  8. 8. @rbkeefer Three Perspectives User TeamClient
  9. 9. @rbkeefer Seven Principles for Peace of Mind Things should Work as Expected Always Know How Things Are Going Quality is Baked In Always Know How the Parts Relate to the Whole Interaction should be Distraction Free Things Go Better when Done with Others Embrace Your Complexity and No One Else’s
  10. 10. @rbkeefer Things Should Work as Expected
  11. 11. @rbkeefer Things Should Work as Expected
  12. 12. @rbkeefer Expectations are premeditated disappointments. Things Should Work as Expected
  13. 13. @rbkeefer User Expectations of System Performance: • Respond within one second to avoid interrupting a user’s flow of thought • Distraction and performance of other tasks if an application’s response time exceeds ten seconds • Complete sub-tasks in less than a minute • Complete an entire task in less than ten minutes. Things Should Work as Expected Nielsen, J. (2009) Powers of 10: Time Scales in User Experience.
  14. 14. @rbkeefer Manage Expectations: •Align expectations with use •Perception is reality Things Should Work as Expected Turner, S. (2008). Selling the Sizzle: The Importance of Managing Expectations. User Experience Magazine, 7(2).
  15. 15. @rbkeefer Unknown expectations will go unmet. Things Should Work as Expected
  16. 16. @rbkeefer Seven Principles for Peace of Mind Things should Work as Expected
  17. 17. @rbkeefer Always Know How Things Are Going
  18. 18. @rbkeefer Always Know How Things are Going Tactical Pivotal Strategic
  19. 19. @rbkeefer Tactical: Daily standup meetings; Quality measures Pivotal: Relative progress toward cycle goals Strategic: Frequency of production releases; Backlog growth Always Know How Things are Going Applied to Agile Teams:
  20. 20. @rbkeefer Tactical: Daily homework; Test / quiz scores Pivotal: Periodic grade cards Strategic: Grade level completion; Graduation Applied to Children’s Grades: Always Know How Things are Going
  21. 21. @rbkeefer Seven Principles for Peace of Mind Things should Work as Expected Always Know How Things Are Going
  22. 22. @rbkeefer Quality is Baked In
  23. 23. @rbkeefer Quality is Baked In
  24. 24. @rbkeefer Engineering Quality Measures: • Correctness • Reliability • Robustness • Integrity • Efficiency • Testability • Maintainability • Flexibility • Resilience • Portability • Interoperability • Generality • Functionality • Validity • Etc. Quality is Baked In
  25. 25. @rbkeefer Users Measure Quality (SUS): No Trust Some Trust Begrudging Use Cynical Satisfaction Basic Promises Fulfilled Fits Environment No Negative Consequences Delights Quality is Baked In Bangor, A., et al. (2009) Determining what Individual SUS Scores Mean: Adding an Adjective Rating Scale. Journal of Usability Studies, 4(3). pp. 114 - 123.
  26. 26. @rbkeefer Quality is Baked In Net Promoter Score: Loyal Enthusiasts Satisfied / Unenthusiastic Unhappy Customers
  27. 27. @rbkeefer Seven Principles for Peace of Mind Things should Work as Expected Always Know How Things Are Going Quality is Baked In
  28. 28. @rbkeefer Always Know How the Parts Relate to the Whole
  29. 29. @rbkeefer Always Know How the Parts Relate to the Whole
  30. 30. @rbkeefer Always Know How the Parts Relate to the Whole
  31. 31. @rbkeefer Organizations which design systems … are constrained to produce designs which are copies of the communication structures of these organizations. ~ Melvin Conway, 1967 Software Architecture Always Know How the Parts Relate to the Whole
  32. 32. @rbkeefer Always Know How the Parts Relate to the Whole Information Architecture Keefer, R. (2015) Creating a DoGo Map: A Step-by-Step Guide. User Experience Magazine. February. Vol. 15(1). http://bit.ly/1zPyfZu Keefer, R. (2015) Adapting Information Architecture for Lean and Agile Environments with DoGo Mapping. UX Magazine. January. No. 1371. http://bit.ly/1DUV6Hh
  33. 33. @rbkeefer Investors Development Team Costs Business Value Architecture Always Know How the Parts Relate to the Whole Users Customers Benefits Keefer, R. (2018) Evidence-Based Story Mapping. User Experience Magazine, 18(2).
  34. 34. @rbkeefer Seven Principles for Peace of Mind Things should Work as Expected Always Know How Things Are Going Quality is Baked In Always Know How the Parts Relate to the Whole
  35. 35. @rbkeefer Interaction Should be Distraction Free
  36. 36. @rbkeefer Interaction Should be Distraction Free
  37. 37. @rbkeefer Interaction Should be Distraction Free Interruption of a task that required moderate to high cognitive load had a significant impact on: • the time required to complete the task • levels of annoyance and anxiety Bailey, B., et al. (2001) The Effects of Interruptions on Task Performance,Annoyance, and Anxiety in the User Interface. Interact .Vol. 1. Mark, G., et al. (2008) The Cost of Interrupted Work: More Speed and Stress. CHI 2008 Proceedings.
  38. 38. @rbkeefer Interaction Should be Distraction Free “I have sort of come to rely on interrupts. If I’m not being interrupted, I don’t know what to do. I have to generate an internal interrupt of some sort to get me going.” ~ Manager Hudson, J., et al. (2002) “I’d Be Overwhelmed, But It’s Just One More Thing to Do.:” Availability and Interruption in Research Management. CHI 2002 Proceedings, 4(1).
  39. 39. @rbkeefer Interaction Should be Distraction Free “I used to be really good at keeping a list of things to do, but once I became a manger, the list slowly disappeared, and now I focus on whatever is in front of me in the moment.” ~ Interview Participant
  40. 40. @rbkeefer Interaction Should be Distraction Free $300 Million Button Spool, J. (2009) The $300 Million Button. https://articles.uie.com/three_hund_million_button/
  41. 41. @rbkeefer Interaction Should be Distraction Free $300 Million Button Spool, J. (2009) The $300 Million Button. https://articles.uie.com/three_hund_million_button/ Skip
  42. 42. @rbkeefer Seven Principles for Peace of Mind Things should Work as Expected Always Know How Things Are Going Quality is Baked In Always Know How the Parts Relate to the Whole Interaction should be Distraction Free
  43. 43. @rbkeefer Things Go Better When Done with Others
  44. 44. @rbkeefer Things Go Better when Done with Others
  45. 45. @rbkeefer Start with ‘we’ Things Go Better when Done with Others
  46. 46. @rbkeefer ‘Make’ people get together Start with ‘we’ Things Go Better when Done with Others
  47. 47. @rbkeefer Begin with your next new hire ‘Make’ people get together Start with ‘we’ Things Go Better when Done with Others
  48. 48. @rbkeefer Seven Principles for Peace of Mind Things should Work as Expected Always Know How Things Are Going Quality is Baked In Always Know How the Parts Relate to the Whole Interaction should be Distraction Free Things Go Better when Done with Others
  49. 49. @rbkeefer Embrace Your Complexity and No One Else’s
  50. 50. @rbkeefer Embrace Your Complexity and No One Else’s
  51. 51. @rbkeefer Admit that complexity exists Embrace Your Complexity and No One Else’s
  52. 52. @rbkeefer Determine who owns the complexity Admit that complexity exists Embrace Your Complexity and No One Else’s
  53. 53. @rbkeefer If it’s your complexity - embrace it Determine who owns the complexity Admit that complexity exists Embrace Your Complexity and No One Else’s
  54. 54. @rbkeefer If it’s your complexity - embrace it Determine who owns the complexity Admit that complexity exists Else - push back Embrace Your Complexity and No One Else’s
  55. 55. @rbkeefer Seven Principles for Peace of Mind Things should Work as Expected Always Know How Things Are Going Quality is Baked In Always Know How the Parts Relate to the Whole Interaction should be Distraction Free Things Go Better when Done with Others Embrace Your Complexity and No One Else’s
  56. 56. @rbkeefer Three Perspectives User TeamClient
  57. 57. @rbkeefer Things should Work as Expected User TeamClient Simple Cohesive Feedback Tools Tests Environment Integrity Engaged Quality
  58. 58. @rbkeefer Always Know how Things are Going User TeamClient Breadcrumbs Clear Labels Appropriate Navigation Transparency Clarity Certainty Test Results Team Capacity Build/Deploy Status
  59. 59. @rbkeefer Quality is Baked In User TeamClient “Just Works” Assurance Clear communication Verify information architecture Clarify taxonomy Test interaction design Code coverage (60% min) Continuous integration/testing/deployment Short concise methods
  60. 60. @rbkeefer Always Know how the Parts are Related to the Whole User TeamClient Impact of risks Relate demo to release plan Understand domain Interactions affect domain Understand architectures Understand effect of change
  61. 61. @rbkeefer Interaction should be Distraction Free User TeamClient Low cost of failure Limit use of pop-ups Focus Limit external distractions Planned feedback Published agenda Finish early Focused communication
  62. 62. @rbkeefer Things Go Better when Done with Others User TeamClient Identify all stakeholders Invite stakeholders into process Identify primary interactions Provide open communication Open team communication Direct contact with PO Timely answers to questions
  63. 63. @rbkeefer Embrace Your Complexity and No One Else’s User TeamClient Embrace domain decisions Shun technical complexity Embrace domain complexity Shun technical complexity Embrace technical complexity Shun domain decisions
  64. 64. @rbkeefer Seven Principles for Peace of Mind Things should Work as Expected Always Know How Things Are Going Quality is Baked In Always Know How the Parts Relate to the Whole Interaction should be Distraction Free Things Go Better when Done with Others Embrace Your Complexity and No One Else’s
  65. 65. @rbkeefer References • Bailey, B., et al. (2001) The Effects of Interruptions on Task Performance, Annoyance, and Anxiety in the User Interface. Interact . Vol. 1. • Bangor, A., et al. (2009) Determining what Individual SUS Scores Mean: Adding an Adjective Rating Scale. Journal of Usability Studies, 4(3). pp. 114 - 123. • Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1990). Flow: The psychology of optimal experience. New York: Harper & Row. • Hudson, J., et al. (2002) “I’d Be Overwhelmed, But It’s Just One More Thing to Do.:” Availability and Interruption in Research Management. CHI 2002 Proceedings, 4(1). • Keefer, R. (2018) Evidence-Based Story Mapping. User Experience Magazine, 18(2). https://bit.ly/2PXESZv • Keefer, R. (2015) Creating a DoGo Map: A Step-by-Step Guide. User Experience Magazine. February. Vol. 15(1). http://bit.ly/1zPyfZu • Keefer, R. (2015) Adapting Information Architecture for Lean and Agile Environments with DoGo Mapping. UX Magazine. January. No. 1371. http://bit.ly/1DUV6Hh • Keefer, R. (2014) Designing for Peace of Mind: Almost Getting to Flow. User Experience Magazine. Vol. 14(2). pp. 24-26. http://bit.ly/ 1B6ZCTZ • Mark, G., et al. (2008) The Cost of Interrupted Work: More Speed and Stress. CHI 2008 Proceedings. • Matsudaira, K. (2018) Bad Software Architecture is a People Problem. Communications of the ACM, 59(9). • Nielsen, J. (2009) Powers of 10: Time Scales in User Experience. https://www.nngroup.com/articles/powers-of-10-time-scales-in-ux/ • Spool, J. (2009) The $300 Million Button. https://articles.uie.com/three_hund_million_button/ • Turner, S. (2008). Selling the Sizzle: The Importance of Managing Expectations. User Experience Magazine, 7(2).
  66. 66. @rbkeefer Rob Keefer, PhD rob.keefer@ilwllc.com Continue the Conversation

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