Snacking and Gaming: What We Know So Far

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Snacking and Gaming: What We Know So Far (Presentation in Keynote)

At the Games for Health Conference (2010), we reviewed existing research regarding snacking, and the impacts of gameplay on snacking. We also shared initial data on a pilot study conducted in NMSU's Learning Games Lab, where we compared snack consumption across three types of activities: video game play, board game play, video watching. Barbara Chamberlin, Ph.D., Rachel Gallagher, Michelle Garza, Pamela Martinez

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  • Snacking and Gaming: What We Know So Far

    1. 1. Snacking and Gaming What we know so far Barbara Chamberlin, PhD • bchamber@nmsu.edu Michelle Garza, Rachel Gallagher, Pamela Martinez
    2. 2. Research WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT SNACKS AND GAMES?
    3. 3. Screen Time & Sedentary Behavior New Mexico State University
    4. 4. Screen Time & Sedentary Behavior New Mexico State University
    5. 5. Screen Time & Sedentary Behavior • Sitting in front of a screen = low levels of physical activity. (Foster, Jensen, Foster, Redmond, Walker, Heinz, and Levine 2006) New Mexico State University
    6. 6. Screen Time & Sedentary Behavior • Sitting in front of a screen = low levels of physical activity. (Foster, Jensen, Foster, Redmond, Walker, Heinz, and Levine 2006) • Children spend as much as 55 hours per week in front of the screen (Vanderwater, Bickham and Lee, 2006) New Mexico State University
    7. 7. Screen Time & Sedentary Behavior • Sitting in front of a screen = low levels of physical activity. (Foster, Jensen, Foster, Redmond, Walker, Heinz, and Levine 2006) • Children spend as much as 55 hours per week in front of the screen (Vanderwater, Bickham and Lee, 2006) • Except for sleeping, American children spend more time watching television and playing video games than doing anything else (Epstein, Paluch, Gordy and Dorn, 2000) New Mexico State University
    8. 8. Is there something else going on? New Mexico State University
    9. 9. Is there something else going on? TV as a trigger • excessive inactivity with increased intake (weight gain) • food advertising (Vandewater, Shim, and Caplovitz, 2003) New Mexico State University
    10. 10. Is there something else going on? TV as a trigger • excessive inactivity with increased intake (weight gain) • food advertising (Vandewater, Shim, and Caplovitz, 2003) TV as a conditioner to engage in snacking • trigger behavior pattern • distract from consumption and portion size (Gore et al, 2003; Epstein, Coleman and Myers, 1996) New Mexico State University
    11. 11. Is there something else going on? TV as a trigger • excessive inactivity with increased intake (weight gain) • food advertising (Vandewater, Shim, and Caplovitz, 2003) TV as a conditioner to engage in snacking • trigger behavior pattern • distract from consumption and portion size (Gore et al, 2003; Epstein, Coleman and Myers, 1996) Passive screen time displaces healthier activities • less engagement in sports • consumption of fewer healthier foods (Tremblay and Willms, 2003) New Mexico State University
    12. 12. and what about snacking? New Mexico State University
    13. 13. and what about snacking? Snacks • often consumed in excess of dietary needs (Salvy, Kieffer, and Epstein, 2007) New Mexico State University
    14. 14. and what about snacking? Snacks • often consumed in excess of dietary needs (Salvy, Kieffer, and Epstein, 2007) Passive screen time • associated with snacking (Epstein, Coleman and Myers, 1996) New Mexico State University
    15. 15. Games and Snacking Wheeling Jesuit University, Department of Psychology New Mexico State University
    16. 16. Games and Snacking Wheeling Jesuit University, Department of Psychology Compared to xBox, youth playing Wii: •higher caloric expenditure •ate less snack amounts, and healthier snack options •demonstrated greatest mental and physical demand (Bloom, J., Hunker, R., McCombs, K., Raudenbush, B., & Wright, T., 2008; Kolks, J., Wright, T., & Raudenbush, B., 2009) New Mexico State University
    17. 17. Games and Snacking Wheeling Jesuit University, Department of Psychology Compared to xBox, youth playing Wii: •higher caloric expenditure •ate less snack amounts, and healthier snack options •demonstrated greatest mental and physical demand (Bloom, J., Hunker, R., McCombs, K., Raudenbush, B., & Wright, T., 2008; Kolks, J., Wright, T., & Raudenbush, B., 2009) Youth playing Wii and Xbox had showed less snack consumption than the control group (youth sitting in an empty room for 15 min). (Kolks, J., Wright, T., & Raudenbush, B., 2009) New Mexico State University
    18. 18. Games and Snacking Wheeling Jesuit University, Department of Psychology New Mexico State University
    19. 19. Games and Snacking Wheeling Jesuit University, Department of Psychology •Gameplay decreased youth’s ability to estimate amount of snack consumed (Cessna, T., Raudenbush, B., Reed, A., & Hunker, R, 2007) New Mexico State University
    20. 20. Our Study SNACKS, GAMES AND VIDEOS
    21. 21. New Mexico State University
    22. 22. New Mexico State University
    23. 23. Our Snack Pilot Subjects: 8 Adults 11 Mid-school students 6 High school students 3 days of each 10-day session New Mexico State University
    24. 24. How? Offered pre-weighed cups of pretzels and goldfish crackers Engaged participants in open video game play videos on animation process open board game play 60 minutes kicked them out and weighed the cups New Mexico State University
    25. 25. Findings HOW DID TYPE OF ACTIVITY AFFECT SNACKING?
    26. 26. Our Data Mid School Kids, n=11 High School Kids, n=6 Adults, n=8 Video Games Videos Board Games 0 25 50 75 100 New Mexico State University
    27. 27. Generalizations Video gamers snacked less, in all groups (mid school, high school and adults). Gameplay included exergames and sedentary games. Adults and high schoolers snacked most during social board game activities. Mid schoolers snacked most during passive video watching. New Mexico State University
    28. 28. Limitations Needs analysis Pilot study, n=25 Variation in kids, hunger, New Mexico State University
    29. 29. Now where? Possible Expansions larger sample size home-based study compare different types of video game play sedentary v. non- sedentary content or theming of game New Mexico State University
    30. 30. References Bloom, J., Hunker, R., McCombs, K., Raudenbush, B., & Wright, T. (2008).  Nintendo Wii vs. Microsoft Xbox: Differential effects on mood, physiology, snacking behavior, and caloric burn.  Appetite, 51(2), 354. Cessna, T., Raudenbush, B., Reed, A., & Hunker, R. (2007).  Effects of video game play on snacking behavior.  Appetite, 49(1), 282. Epstein L.,, Coleman KJ, Myers MD; (1996). Exercise in treating obesity in children and adolescents.; Med Sci Sports Exercise, Apr; 28(4); 428-435.  Kolks, J., Wright, T., & Raudenbush, B. (2009).  Effects of video game console and snack type on snack consumption during play.  Appetite, 52(3), 841. Tremblay MS, Willms JD. (2003). Is the Canadian childhood obesity epidemic related to physical inactivity? International Journal of Obesity 27: 1100-1105.  Gore, S. A., Foster, J. A., DiLillo, V. G., Kirk, K., & Smith West, D. (2003). Television viewing and snacking. Eating Behaviors, 4(4), 399-405. doi: 10.1016/s1471-0153(03)00053-9 Salvy, S.-J., Kieffer, E., & Epstein, L. H. (2008). Effects of social context on overweight and normal-weight children's food selection. Eating Behaviors, 9(2), 190-196. doi: 10.1016/j.eatbeh.2007.08.001 Vandewater, E.A., M.-S. Shim and A.G Caplovitz. (2003). Linking Obesity with Children’s Television and Video Game Use. Journal of Adolescence 27:71-85. New Mexico State University
    31. 31. Snacking and Gaming What we know so far Barbara Chamberlin, PhD • bchamber@nmsu.edu Michelle Garza, Rachel Gallagher, Pamela Martinez

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