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Cycling & Society symposium Lancaster 2016

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We contributed to the symposium by analysing policy, more here http://newcycling.org/cycling-society-2016-our-presentation/

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Cycling & Society symposium Lancaster 2016

  1. 1. Probing elusive power structures within a city’s cycling politics Sally Watson Cycling & Society Symposium 2016 Lancaster Katja Leyendecker
  2. 2. Framework for analysis Jensen (2013) Policy document analysis Space observations and interrogation of secondary data sets User perspective and need In conclusion > ideas for the decision-making and campaigning processes involved in making Newcastle’s civic society fit for cycling.
  3. 3. User perspective and need No city in Europe or North America has achieved high level of cycling without an extensive network of well-integrated bike lanes and paths that provide separation from motor vehicle traffic. […] Separate cycling facilities are a crucial first step towards increasing cycling and making it socially inclusive. Pucher & Buehler (2012:351) It is clear from our research that most non-cyclists and recreational cyclists will only consider cycling regularly if they are segregated from [motor vehicle] traffic Pooley et al (2013:176) Monsereetal(2014)Aldred(2014)
  4. 4. NewcastleGateshead __________________________ Population 490,000 Density person/km 2,000 Source: Wikipedia Map source: openstreetmap.org Space observations and interrogation of secondary data sets Walking Cycling Public Transport Private car
  5. 5. ¬ Planning for the Future Newcastle and Gateshead Local Plan (2015) • ‘basis on which we can plan the development’ p.9 Our investigative themes Policy document analysis How is space for cycling dealt with? PULL PUSH How is car parking dealt with? National context – NPPF (National Planning Policy Framework) ‘The transport system needs to be balanced in favour of sustainable transport modes’ p. 9
  6. 6. PULL MEASURES - SPACE FOR CYCLING Urban Core ‘movement into, through and around the Urban Core will be improved by promoting travel by sustainable modes and minimising through traffic’ p. 48 Outer areas ‘aim of the Plan is to create sustainable communities, centres and new developments where priority is given to sustainable modes of transport’ p. 88 Policy document analysis
  7. 7. PULL MEASURES - SPACE FOR CYCLING Policy document analysis ‘the policy promotes cycling in accordance with both Councils’ Cycling Strategies’ p. 138 ‘The Newcastle Cycling Strategy includes a Strategic Cycle Network. This includes Strategic Cycle Routes to connect the surrounding areas to the Urban Core. They will be direct links to the Urban Core providing greater cycling priority.’ p. 138
  8. 8. PUSH MEASURES – CAR PARKING Policy document analysis ‘New parking provision will be located on the edge [of the Urban Core] so that walking and cycling become a more attractive alternative to travel by car’ p. 32 ’A balance will be maintained between an appropriate supply of car parking while encouraging travel by sustainable modes.’ p. 146
  9. 9. PUSH MEASURES – CAR PARKING Policy document analysis Policy CS13 (Transport) The enhancement and delivery of an integrated transport network to support sustainable development and economic growth will be achieved by: 1. Promoting sustainable travel choices including vii. The management of car parking locations, supply and pricing ‘The “Alive After 5” [free car parking after 17:00] initiative has been a great success in promoting use of car parks outside of peak times and further opportunities will be explored’ p.146 ?
  10. 10. Policy document analysis ‘while still acknowledging the need to cater for the private car’ p. 85
  11. 11. In conclusion Power and politics Dominant: socio-technical system of automobility (Urry, 2005) Over decades, we have been concentrating on the individual too much and ‘forgot’ systemic issues (Spotswood et al, 2015) Dynamics of neoliberal politics (Harvey, 2005)
  12. 12. In conclusion Importance of the alternative voice
  13. 13. In conclusion Changing dominant paradigm through coordinated action Automobility, Urry (2004) Velomobility, Koglin (2014) New mobility paradigm, Sheller (2006)
  14. 14. Thank you Email S.Watson2@newcastle.ac.uk katja.leyendecker@northumbria.ac.uk Twitter @sallyonbike @katsdekker
  15. 15. References • Aldred, R. (2015). Adults’ attitudes towards child cycling: a study of the impact of infrastructure. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURE RESEARCH, 15(2), 92 - 115. • Harvey, D. (2005). A brief history of neoliberalism. Oxford: Oxford University Press. • Jensen, O. B. (2013). Staging mobilities: Routledge. • Pooley, C. G. et al. (2013). Promoting Walking and Cycling : New Perspectives on Sustainable Travel. Bristol: Policy Press. • Pucher, J. R., & Buehler, R. (2012). City cycling: MIT Press. • Spotswood, F. et al. (2015). Analysing cycling as a social practice: An empirical grounding for behaviour change. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 29, 22-33. doi:10.1016/j.trf.2014.12.001 • Urry, J. (2004). The ‘System’ of Automobility. Theory, Culture & Society, 21(4-5), 25-39. doi:10.1177/0263276404046059 • Koglin, T. (2014). Vélomobility and the politics of transport planning. GeoJournal, 80, 569-586. doi:10.1007/s10708-014-9565-7 • Monsere, C., et al. (2014). NITC-RR-583 Protected Lanes - lessons from the green lanes : evaluating protected bike lanes in the US. • Sheller, M., & Urry, J. (2006). The new mobilities paradigm. Environment and Planning A, 38(2), 207-226. doi:10.1068/a37268
  16. 16. Abstract Probing elusive power structures within a city’s cycling politics Transport cycling in all its forms (performing, production and politics) is pushing hard against the socio-technical system of automobility, as described by Urry (2004). The spatial turn combined with the need to re-apportion urban space away from the car (Pooley et al, 2013; and Pucher & Buehler, 2012), making the implementation of transport cycling incontestably political. In resistance to automobility, velomobility studies, such as by Koglin (2014), are emerging under the new mobilities model (Sheller et al, 2006) investigating current imbalances and redirecting future trajectories toward a more sustainable society. Our investigation seeks to uncover and dissect the structures of power and politics present in a city that has started a tentative transition away from the private car. Using Jensen’s staging mobilities framework (Jensen, 2013, page 6), we will begin our examination by looking from ‘above’ and carry out document analysis on transport-related policies for Newcastle upon Tyne. This gives us an understanding of the way highways and public spaces are valued, albeit in a theoretical political plain. The actual practical plain will be evaluated through space observations and interrogation of secondary data sets. Looking from ‘below’ we will assemble a user perspective on the possibilities and needs of space reallocation through interviews and natural observations. Bringing the ‘above’ and ‘below’ together we will discuss what the pressures are that are put on the practices that produce space and the political skills to command a transport transition. In conclusion we will draw on our activist backgrounds to formulate ideas for the decision-making and campaigning processes involved in making Newcastle’s civic society fit for cycling. References 1. Jensen, O. B. (2013). Staging mobilities: Routledge. 2. Urry, J. (2004). The ‘System’ of Automobility. Theory, Culture & Society, 21(4-5), 25-39. doi:10.1177/0263276404046059 3. Pucher, J. R., & Buehler, R. (2012). City cycling: MIT Press 4. Pooley, C. G., et al. (2013). Promoting Walking and Cycling : New Perspectives on Sustainable Travel. Bristol: Policy Press 5. Koglin, T. (2014). Vélomobility and the politics of transport planning. GeoJournal, 80, 569-586. doi:10.1007/s10708- 014-9565-7 6. Sheller, M., & Urry, J. (2006). The new mobilities paradigm. Environment and Planning A, 38(2), 207-226. doi:10.1068/a37268

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