Week 2 Sanitation And Safety

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Week 2 Sanitation And Safety

  1. 1. Week 2 Menus and Recipes Basics Food Nutrition Sanitation and Safety . 2248 email: tpavit@wu.ac.th 1
  2. 2. Outline • Menus and Recipes • Basics Food Nutrition • Sanitation and Safety 2
  3. 3. Menus and Recipe 3
  4. 4. Menus and Recipe • Menus are used in the dining room to give both wait staff and guests important information about what the establishment offers. • Recipes give detailed instructions to aid kitchen staff to produce menu items. • Carefully designed menus and recipes can help chef in kitchen operation and control costs 4
  5. 5. Menu VS Recipe Measuring ingredients accurately Standardized recipes 5
  6. 6. The Basics of Nutrition 6
  7. 7. The Basics of Nutrition • Nutrition refers to the study of diet and health. • It is through the comprehension of this study that we as foodservice professionals can accommodate and enrich various dietary preferences and restrictions. • Meeting the dietary needs of today’s lifestyles involves an understanding that people eat or don’t eat certain foods for different reasons. 7
  8. 8. Nutrition from the Customer’ Customer’s Point of View 8
  9. 9. Customer’ Nutrition from the Customer’s Point of View • As the dining public becomes more knowledgeable about nutrition, and continues to be more concerned about health, it will become more demanding of nutritious food items when dining out. • A National Restaurant Association (NRA) discovered that customers can be group in THREE categories in regard to their attitudes toward nutrition when dining out. 9
  10. 10. THREE categories of customer 1. Committed Patron – considered HEALTHFUL 2. Vacillating Patron – concerned about nutrition & eating helpful food but they are driven by taste and occasion 3. The Unconcerned Patron – unconcern with making healthful choices 10
  11. 11. An Overview of Nutrition 11
  12. 12. Nutrition • Is the study of food and their relationship to HEALTH. • Good nutrition required the consumption of foods that are low in FAT, high in FIBER, and high in NUTRIENTS. • The Nutritional habits are improving between good eating habits and good health. 12
  13. 13. An Overview of Nutrition • (nutrient) • 13
  14. 14. • “ ” 40 6 , , , , , 14
  15. 15. • 2 15
  16. 16. • 5 16
  17. 17. • 1 17
  18. 18. • 2 ( 1 2 6 12) 18
  19. 19. • 1 3 4 19
  20. 20. • , , 20
  21. 21. • 2 3 10 20 2 3 21
  22. 22. 5 22
  23. 23. 5 1. ( ) 2. ( ) 3. 4. 5. ( ) 23
  24. 24. 24
  25. 25. Sanitation in Foodservice Operations 25
  26. 26. Food Sanitation 26
  27. 27. • • • • Food-borne disease 27
  28. 28. Goals of an Effective Sanitation Program 1. To protect food from contamination through safe handling procedures 2. To reduce the effects of contamination 28
  29. 29. PRELIMINARY DEFINITIONS • Clean • Free from Soil • Contamination • The unintended presence of harmful substances or microorganisms in food or beverage • Cross- • Allowing harmful substances to come contamination in contact with new products • Food-borne • A disease that is carried or passed to illness human beings by food 29
  30. 30. PRELIMINARY DEFINITIONS • Food-borne • A report incident of two or more illness outbreak people becoming ill from a common food, which is confirmed through laboratory analysis as the source of illness • Sanitation • Free of decrease-causing bacteria/ creation and maintenance of healthful conditions 30
  31. 31. ! 31
  32. 32. • ? 32
  33. 33. • .................................................... ? • 33
  34. 34. 34
  35. 35. Contribution Factors of Food borne in US Inadequate Poor personal cooking, 17% hygine, 22% Contaminated equipment, 10% Food from Unsafe source 7% Improper holding Others 7% temparatures, 37% 35
  36. 36. 1. (Bacterial Infection) 2. (Bacterial intoxication) 3. (Virus infection) 4. (Parasitic Infection) 5. (Chemical Poisons) 6. (Food Additives) 7. (Poisonous Plants and Animals) 36
  37. 37. ก ก F ก F F F ก ก F ก ก F F ก ก F ก F ก F 37
  38. 38. = Chemical ก Biological Physical The Hazards to Food Safety 38
  39. 39. • 39
  40. 40. • MSG 40
  41. 41. • • F.A.T.T.O.M. • Food, Acid, Temperature, Time, Oxygen, Moisture 41
  42. 42. FATTOM • F = Food • A = Acidity - • T = Time • T = Temperature • O = Oxygen • M = Moisture 42
  43. 43. • 3 1. Bacteria 2. Virus 3. Molds 43
  44. 44. Bacteria • • • 44
  45. 45. Virus • • • • 45
  46. 46. Molds • - 46
  47. 47. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 47
  48. 48. The 8 most often cited factors in Food- Food-Borne illness outbreaks 1. Failure to cool food properly 2. Failure to heat or cook food thoroughly 3. Employees with illness, infection, and poor personal hygiene 4. Food prepared a day or more before it is to served 5. Contaminated raw ingredients added to ready-to-eat foods 6. Food remaining in the temperature dangerous zone 7. Failure to reheat previously prepared foods 8. Cross-contamination of raw and cooked foods 48
  49. 49. 5-60oC 20-25 oC 20- 49
  50. 50. Temperature Danger Zone 50
  51. 51. • 100 61 • 60 5 • 4 0 • 0 -18 51
  52. 52. / / --- 52
  53. 53. Food Safety 53
  54. 54. Food Safety 54
  55. 55. • 1. 2. - 60 . 3. 4. 5. 55
  56. 56. ( ) 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 56
  57. 57. ( ) 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 57
  58. 58. “ 2 ” 58
  59. 59. WASH RINSE SANITIZE F F F 59
  60. 60. Cross contamination 60
  61. 61. Produce graphic illustrating: • Check • Clean • Cook • Separate • Chill • Throw away 61
  62. 62. CHECK • Check to be sure that the fresh fruits and vegetables you buy are not bruised or damaged. • Check that fresh cut fruits and vegetables like packaged salads and precut melons are refrigerated at the store before buying. Do not buy fresh cut items that are not refrigerated. 62
  63. 63. • Wash hands with warm water and soap for at least 20 seconds before and after handling fresh fruits and vegetables. • Clean all surfaces and utensils with hot water and soap, including cutting boards, counter tops, peelers and knives that will touch fresh fruits or vegetables before and after food preparation. 63
  64. 64. • Rinse fresh fruits and vegetables under running tap water, including those with skins and rinds that are not eaten. Packaged fruits and vegetables labeled “ready-to-eat”, “washed” or “triple washed” need not be washed. • Rub firm-skin fruits and vegetables under running tap water or scrub with a clean vegetable brush while rinsing with running tap water. 64
  65. 65. • Dry fruits and vegetables with a clean cloth towel or paper towel. • Never use detergent or bleach to wash fresh fruits or vegetables. These products are not intended for consumption. 65
  66. 66. • When shopping, be sure fresh fruits and vegetables are separated from household chemicals, and raw foods such as meat, poultry, and seafood in your cart and in bags at checkout. • Keep fresh fruits and vegetables separate from raw meat, poultry, or seafood in your refrigerator. 66
  67. 67. • Separate fresh fruits and vegetables from raw meat, poultry and seafood. Do not use the same cutting board without cleaning with hot water and soap before and after preparing fresh fruits and vegetables. 67
  68. 68. • Cook or throw away fruits or vegetables that have touched raw meat, poultry, seafood or their juices. 68
  69. 69. • Refrigerate all cut, peeled or cooked fresh fruits and vegetables within two hours. 69
  70. 70. THROW AWAY • Throw away fresh fruits and vegetables that have not been refrigerated within two hours of cutting, peeling, or cooking. • Remove and throw away bruised or damaged portions of fruits and vegetables when preparing to cook them or before eating them raw. • Throw away any fruit or vegetable that will not be cooked if it has touched raw meat, poultry or seafood. • If in doubt, throw it out! 70
  71. 71. 4 .( ) • • • • • • 71
  72. 72. 4 .( ) • • • • • 72
  73. 73. Thank You 73
  74. 74. (10%) – 22 . . 53 WESTERN EASTERN 1. France (3) 1. Australia 2. Italy 2. China 3. Mediterranean 3. Korea 4. Eastern Europe 4. Japan 5. America 5. India 6. Mexico and S.USA 6. Thai (3) 7. Middle East 7. Malaysia / Indonesia 74
  75. 75. 1. Culture and traditional 2. Type of Meal and Foods 3. Cooking Techniques 4. Cooking Equipments 5. Ingredients 6. Famous Dishes and Example of Recipes 75

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