PR:EPARE: Developing      Practitioner and Student Motivation in Relationship andSex Education (RSE) through a       Game ...
SEX
Overview• PR:EPARE  Serious Game  for RSE• Positive  Relationships:  Eliminating  Pressure &  coercion from  Adolescent  R...
Introduction• Funding from the Health Innovation &  Education Cluster (HIEC) West Midlands  (South)  – part of the NHS con...
Introduction• Aim: to develop and evaluate an interactive  intervention object that addressed an identified  need in RSE  ...
Game development• Brown, Bayley & Newby (2012)• Stakeholder groups  – Professionals  – 4 x young peoples’ groups• Identifi...
Change objectives & methods• Expect there to be negative consequences of  allowing unwanted sexual advances to continue  –...
Matrices of change examples
Application in a game concept• Full game concept developed in  collaboration with SASH colleagues• Interpreted into gaming...
Game demo
Design• Two factors to consider:• Participatory Design• User Research….Who are the users?• Where does the motivation lie?
Design Breakdown• Practitioner Centred Design:Lesson planning, Time Management, Group Discussion, Control ofScenarios, Fit...
Design Hurdles?                 Where to start….• The Participatory Approach..• Constraints….• Time, Budget, Team, Ideals…...
Evaluation design• Study 1 small-scale cluster randomised  controlled trial based on part1 of game  only (N=505) – 17 clus...
Scale refinement• 16 measures aligned with change objectives• Exploratory factor analysis – 5 underlying  factors – but it...
Findings study 1• 2 (time) x 2 (condition) mixed MANOVA  – Significant main effect of time F[3,501]=2.847,    p=0.037, ŋp2...
Findings study 1 (factor 1)
Findings study 1 (factor 2)
Findings study 1 (factor 3)
Findings study 2• Repeated measures MANOVA comparing  pre-post scores amongst a 2nd cohort of  game players.• Picture mixe...
Discussion• Somewhat mixed picture emerging  – Confidence to recognise coercion and act – some    evidence that there’s a ...
Conclusions and next steps• There are some positive outcomes in  relation to impact of game on psychological  preparedness...
Thanks for listening!    samantha@sgs-lab.comwww.seriousgamesinstitute.co.uk
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PR:EPARe: Developing Practitioner and Student Motivation in Relationship and Sex Education (RSE), through a Game Based Learning Approach

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PR:EPARe: Developing Practitioner and Student Motivation in Relationship and Sex Education (RSE), through a Game Based Learning Approach by Sylvester Arnab, Samantha Clarke & Alex Woolner

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  • Experience of sexual coercion is related to increased sexual risk-taking, increased diagnosis of STI and increased rates of unwanted or unintended pregnancy.
  • Good internal reliability – Cronbach’s alphasGood split-half reliability
  • PR:EPARe: Developing Practitioner and Student Motivation in Relationship and Sex Education (RSE), through a Game Based Learning Approach

    1. 1. PR:EPARE: Developing Practitioner and Student Motivation in Relationship andSex Education (RSE) through a Game Based Approach. Samantha Clarke Sylvester Arnab Alex Woolner
    2. 2. SEX
    3. 3. Overview• PR:EPARE Serious Game for RSE• Positive Relationships: Eliminating Pressure & coercion from Adolescent Relationships
    4. 4. Introduction• Funding from the Health Innovation & Education Cluster (HIEC) West Midlands (South) – part of the NHS confederation in the UK• Proposed development & evaluation of a serious game for RSE using an intervention mapping approach (Bartholomew et al., 2011)• Iterative process for health promotion• Theory & evidence and stakeholders• Evaluation and implementation
    5. 5. Introduction• Aim: to develop and evaluate an interactive intervention object that addressed an identified need in RSE – Met the needs of stakeholders – Involved end-users and stakeholders in the development – Drew on the theory and evidence base to maximise the likelihood that the intervention would have a positive impact on identified outcome measures• Rapid systematic literature review – Sex education can be effective when it is multi-faceted – Limits of a single Serious Game
    6. 6. Game development• Brown, Bayley & Newby (2012)• Stakeholder groups – Professionals – 4 x young peoples’ groups• Identified sexual coercion as a major issue for young people• More literature review to identify factors that predict experience of coercion – Cultural, environmental, previous abuse – Interested in psychological predictors
    7. 7. Change objectives & methods• Expect there to be negative consequences of allowing unwanted sexual advances to continue – Provide information about and depict the possible negative consequences• Identify the nature and levels of sexual coercion – Give feedback on identification of situations as coercive or not (include a range of natures and levels to consider)• Recognise self as at potential risk of sexual coercion – Encourage thinking about how common coercion can be in its different forms and levels
    8. 8. Matrices of change examples
    9. 9. Application in a game concept• Full game concept developed in collaboration with SASH colleagues• Interpreted into gaming techniques• Part 1 – game show quiz – Scenarios around what is coercion? – Yes, no, maybe responses• Part 2 – first person role play – Scenario 1 - Play role of coerced – Scenario 2 - Play role of person being coercive
    10. 10. Game demo
    11. 11. Design• Two factors to consider:• Participatory Design• User Research….Who are the users?• Where does the motivation lie?
    12. 12. Design Breakdown• Practitioner Centred Design:Lesson planning, Time Management, Group Discussion, Control ofScenarios, Fits with technology available (Smartboards), Score(Evaluation)• Student Centred DesignCombination of 3D and 2D Graphics, Game show Narrative, Audio,Group play or solo play encouraging open communication, Competitiveelement for motivation,Treat them like adults….
    13. 13. Design Hurdles? Where to start….• The Participatory Approach..• Constraints….• Time, Budget, Team, Ideals…• Attitudes to Sex Education• Culture, Religion, Ethics, Upbringing, Curriculum.
    14. 14. Evaluation design• Study 1 small-scale cluster randomised controlled trial based on part1 of game only (N=505) – 17 clusters (7 control; 10 game)• Study 2 pre-post evaluation study based on whole game (N=257)• Participants were male and female secondary school students in Warwickshire and the West Midlands• In school year 9, aged13-14 years
    15. 15. Scale refinement• 16 measures aligned with change objectives• Exploratory factor analysis – 5 underlying factors – but items only loaded onto 3• Confirmatory factor analysis – forced 3 factor solution and varimax rotation – Factor 1 – confidence to recognise and act – Factor 2 – knowledge and positivity towards saying no/others saying no – Factor 3 – understanding of personal risk and consequences
    16. 16. Findings study 1• 2 (time) x 2 (condition) mixed MANOVA – Significant main effect of time F[3,501]=2.847, p=0.037, ŋp2=.0.17 – Significant time x condition interaction F[3,501]=15.306, p<.001, ŋp2=.0.84• Lower score represents greater psychological preparedness for coercion
    17. 17. Findings study 1 (factor 1)
    18. 18. Findings study 1 (factor 2)
    19. 19. Findings study 1 (factor 3)
    20. 20. Findings study 2• Repeated measures MANOVA comparing pre-post scores amongst a 2nd cohort of game players.• Picture mixed – nothing significant relating to confidence to recognise & act• Reduction in positivity around refusal• Increase in understanding of personal risk and consequences
    21. 21. Discussion• Somewhat mixed picture emerging – Confidence to recognise coercion and act – some evidence that there’s a positive effect from the CRCT study 1 (both conditions) plus null finding in study 2 – Knowledge and positive attitudes towards saying no/others saying no – evidence is concerning - control does better than game in CRCT initial study – Understanding personal risk and consequences – findings from both studies show significant for improvements
    22. 22. Conclusions and next steps• There are some positive outcomes in relation to impact of game on psychological preparedness for dealing with coercion• There’s a need for further exploration – this was early beta testing• The next stages need to examine the impact of participatory design on motivation.• What Design elements worked?• PR:EPARe is being deployed in Coventry and Warwickshire area.
    23. 23. Thanks for listening! samantha@sgs-lab.comwww.seriousgamesinstitute.co.uk

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