'Teacher Professionalism in the New Era.' (National Education Conference, 28 May 2009)

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'Teacher Professionalism in the New Era.'
University of Aberdeen, Workshop 2, GTC Scotland National Education Conference, 28 May 2009.

Recently proposed models of teacher professionalism reference, among others, the following characteristics: critical thinking, collective and collaborative action, trust, reflective and reflexive practice, creativity and autonomy. This workshop will consider these attributes and will examine tensions that exist between current practices in Scottish Education and the attributes of teacher professionals in these new models.

Research data from the Scottish Teachers for a New Era Project will be presented to illustrate issues and stimulate discussion with particular reference to values and beliefs held by new entrants to the profession.

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  • 'Teacher Professionalism in the New Era.' (National Education Conference, 28 May 2009)

    1. 1. Teacher Professionalism in a New Era Dr Edward Sosu Prof Douglas Weir David McMurtry GTCS Conference, 28 May 2009
    2. 2. Teacher Professionalism in a New Era Scottish Teachers for a New Era (STNE) involves: The development of learner-centred teachers through effective partnerships . Who are reflective, critical thinkers and use evidence to inform pedagogy and curricular choices. They will be inclusive and provide appropriate and challenging educational experiences for all children . This requires many formerly separate groups to work together , often challenging assumptions and ways of working. The initiative involves a six-year continuum incorporating the four year undergraduate B.Ed , the induction year and the first year of full registration . What is STNE?
    3. 3. Teacher Professionalism in a New Era <ul><li>What does it mean to be a professional teacher? </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Professionalism </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Professional practice </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Professionalization </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Professional learning </li></ul></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Teacher Professionalism in a New Era ‘ Accomplished Teacher Development’ Shulman and Shulman, 2004, page 5 <ul><li>The ability to teach and organize. </li></ul><ul><li>They are motivated </li></ul><ul><li>They are able and can transform vision into reality. </li></ul><ul><li>They are reflective and learn from their own and others’ actions and experiences. </li></ul><ul><li>They are communal </li></ul>
    5. 5. Teacher Professionalism in a New Era Curriculum for Excellence <ul><li>an increased emphasise upon teacher autonomy and responsibility for determining pedagogical approaches </li></ul><ul><li>local decision making </li></ul><ul><li>cross-curricular and cross-sectorial approaches to learning and teaching </li></ul><ul><li>new approaches to formative and summative assessment </li></ul><ul><li>an evidence based approach to teaching and learning. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Teacher Professionalism in a New Era ‘ an inquiry stance on teaching that is critical and transformative’ ‘ Inquiry as Stance’ ‘ to capture the ways we stand, the ways we see, and the lenses we see through as educators’ Cochran-Smith, M. and Lytle, S. (2004) Beyond Certainty: Taking an Inquiry Stance on Practice in Lieberman and Miller Teachers Caught in the Action. Professional Development That Matters. London: Teachers’ College Press Pages 49-50.
    7. 7. Teacher Professionalism in a New Era Knowledge-for-Practice Knowledge-in-Practice Knowledge-of-Practice (Cochran-Smith and Lytle, 2001, pages 47 and 48).
    8. 8. Teacher Professionalism in a New Era <ul><li>Who am I as a teacher? </li></ul><ul><li>What assumptions am I making? </li></ul><ul><li>What am I trying to achieve? </li></ul><ul><li>What sense are my pupils making of my teaching/their learning activities? </li></ul><ul><li>How do (selected) frameworks and ideas relate to and inform my own thinking and practice? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the underlying assumptions? </li></ul><ul><li>How do my efforts as an individual relate to those of others and to wider concerns and agendas for change? </li></ul>
    9. 9. Teacher Professionalism in a New Era General Teacher and Pedagogic-Content Efficacy <ul><li>Confidence in teachers’ ability to make a difference and motivate pupils learning </li></ul><ul><li>Confidence in ones subject knowledge and pedagogic skills </li></ul><ul><li>Influences teachers’ approach to instructional content and students (Stronge, 2007) </li></ul><ul><li>Influences teachers inclusive practice (Hart, 2004) </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the implications of the data below in relation to autonomy, responsibility and professional efficacy </li></ul>
    10. 10. Teacher Professionalism in a New Era General teacher and pedagogic content efficacy [first year students, 2008]
    11. 11. Teacher Professionalism in a New Era
    12. 12. Teacher Professionalism in a New Era Critical and Reflective Thinking <ul><li>Critical and reflective teachers are more likely to apply evidence to lesson planning and teaching process (Hay McBer, 2000) </li></ul><ul><li>Critical thinking may influence psychological adjustment, flexibility and adaptability (Sanchez, 1993) </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the data below and discuss its implication for teacher professionalism </li></ul>
    13. 13. Teacher Professionalism in a New Era [first year students, 2008] Evidence based approach to teaching and learning
    14. 14. Teacher Professionalism in a New Era Note: Data from first year students (2008). Response on scale of 1-5
    15. 15. Teacher Professionalism in a New Era For Discussion Do we agree that teachers need to think more critically about their own practice? What are the pressures which make it difficult for teachers to maintain such a stance?

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