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Supporting Teacher
Professionalism
Insights from TALIS 2013
Prevalence of memorisation
rehearsal, routine exercises, drill and
practice and/or repetition
-2.00 -1.50 -1.00 -0.50 0.00...
Mean mathematics performance, by school location,
after accounting for socio-economic status
Fig II.3.3
33 Background: TAL...
Profiles of
teacher
professionalism
• Defined as knowledge that is necessary for teaching
• Index includes: formal teacher education, and whether the teacher ...
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
Portugal
Spain
Georgia
Chile
Japan
Mexico
France
Brazil
Finland
Cyprus
Flanders(Belgium)
Norway
AbuDhab...
Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc
ounting for socio-economic status
Fig II.3.3
77
Not everywhere...
Netherlands
Romania
Slovak Republic
Bulgaria
Iceland
Georgial
Brazil
England (United Kingdom)
Australia
Alberta (Canada)
L...
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
Portugal
Spain
Georgia
Chile
Japan
Mexico
France
Brazil
Finland
Cyprus
Flanders(Belgium)
Norway
AbuDhab...
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100 Discussindividual
students
Shareresources
Teamconferences
Collaborateforcommon
standards
...
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
England(UK)
Latvia
Malaysia
Estonia
Singapore
Netherlands
Shanghai(China)
Russia
SlovakRe...
Mean mathematics performance, by school location,
after accounting for socio-economic status
Fig II.3.3
1212 Models of tea...
Mean mathematics performance, by school location,
after accounting for socio-economic status
Fig II.3.3
1313 Models of tea...
Impact of teacher
professionalism
Mean mathematics performance, by school location,
after accounting for socio-economic status
Fig II.3.3
1515 Relationship ...
Status of the
profession
Teachers’
perception of
the extent to
which teaching
is valued as a
profession
Satisfaction with
...
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
Overall professionalism = 1
Overall professionalism = 5
Overall professionalism = 10
Mean mathemati...
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
Knowledge = 0
Knowledge = 5
Mean mathematics performance, by school location,
after accounting f...
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
Networks = 0
Networks = 5
Mean mathematics performance, by school location,
after accounting for...
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
Autonomy = 0
Autonomy = 5
Mean mathematics performance, by school location,
after accounting for...
0.00
0.02
0.04
0.06
0.08
0.10
0.12
0.14
0.16
France
Netherlands
Estonia
Georgia
Norway
Slovakia
Portugal
Sweden
Japan
Albe...
0.00
0.05
0.10
0.15
0.20
0.25
Georgia
Iceland
France
Latvia
Slovakia
Romania
Italy
Japan
Finland
Norway
Estonia
Brazil
Spa...
Teacher
professionalism
and equity
2
2424 Mean mathematics performance, by school location,
after accounting for socio-economic status
Fig II.3.3
2424 Concep...
2
2525 Mean mathematics performance, by school location,
after accounting for socio-economic status
Fig II.3.3
2525 Socio-...
2727 Mean mathematics performance, by school location,
after accounting for socio-economic status
Fig II.3.3
2727
Knowledg...
2828 Mean mathematics performance, by school location,
after accounting for socio-economic status
Fig II.3.3
2828
Peer net...
2
2929 Mean mathematics performance, by school location,
after accounting for socio-economic status
Fig II.3.3
2929 Equity...
Conclusions
Mean mathematics performance, by school location,
after accounting for socio-economic status
Fig II.3.3
3131 The importanc...
Mean mathematics performance, by school location,
after accounting for socio-economic status
Fig II.3.3
3232 How can syste...
Mean mathematics performance, by school location,
after accounting for socio-economic status
Fig II.3.3
3333 How can syste...
Mean mathematics performance, by school location,
after accounting for socio-economic status
Fig II.3.3
34
• The report ha...
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Supporting Teacher Professionalism Insights From TALIS 2013

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This report examines the nature and extent of support for teacher professionalism using the Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) 2013, a survey of teachers and principals in 34 countries and economies around the world. Teacher professionalism is defined as the knowledge, skills, and practices that teachers must have in order to be effective educators.

The report focuses on lower secondary teachers (ISCED 2) in different education systems and looks at cross-cultural differences in teacher professionalism. It explores how teacher professionalism is linked to policy-relevant teacher outcomes such as perceived status, satisfaction with profession and school environment or perceived self-efficacy. The publication also tackles equity concerns in teacher professionalism: it examines professionalism support gaps, which are defined as differences in support for teacher professionalism in schools with high levels of disadvantage as compared to those with low-levels of disadvantage. Last but not least, the report presents a number of policy-relevant recommendations to enhance teacher professionalism and equity in access to high-quality teaching in OECD member countries.

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Supporting Teacher Professionalism Insights From TALIS 2013

  1. 1. 1 Supporting Teacher Professionalism Insights from TALIS 2013
  2. 2. Prevalence of memorisation rehearsal, routine exercises, drill and practice and/or repetition -2.00 -1.50 -1.00 -0.50 0.00 0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20 Switzerland Poland Germany Japan Korea France Sweden Shanghai-China Canada Singapore United States Norway Spain Netherlands United Kingdom Prevalence of elaboration reasoning, deep learning, intrinsic motivation, critical thinking, creativity, non-routine problems
  3. 3. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 33 Background: TALIS 2013 …representing more than 4 million teachers in over 30 countries and economies… Over 100 thousand randomly selected lower secondary teachers and their school leaders from over 6500 schools …took an internationally-agreed survey about the working conditions and learning environments in their schools… …responding to questions about their background, their teaching practices, support and development, their relationships with colleagues and students and the leadership in their schools
  4. 4. Profiles of teacher professionalism
  5. 5. • Defined as knowledge that is necessary for teaching • Index includes: formal teacher education, and whether the teacher has incentives for professional development (e.g. receives time release during professional hours) and participates in professional development Knowledge • Defined as teachers’ decision-making power over aspects related to their work • Index includes decision making over: teaching content, course offerings, discipline practices, assessment and materials Autonomy • Defined as opportunities for the information exchange and support needed to maintain high standards of teaching • Index includes: participation in induction, mentoring programmes and/or network of teachers, receiving feedback from direct observations Peer networks 5 55 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 55 Conceptualising Teacher Professionalism
  6. 6. 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Portugal Spain Georgia Chile Japan Mexico France Brazil Finland Cyprus Flanders(Belgium) Norway AbuDhabi(UnitedArabEmirates) Iceland Alberta(Canada) Australia Denmark Israel Korea Malaysia Italy UnitedStates Romania Bulgaria Croatia CzechRepublic Slovakia Shanghai(China) Serbia Latvia Netherlands Poland England(UnitedKingdom) NewZealand Singapore Estonia Russia Networks Autonomy Knowledge Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 66 Teacher professionalism index across TALIS systems
  7. 7. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 77 Not everywhere where induction programmes are accessible do teachers use them Percentage of lower secondary teachers with less than 3 years experience at their school and as a teacher, who are working in schools with the following reported access to formal induction programmes, and their reported participation in such programmes 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Iceland Finland Georgia Serbia Japan SlovakRepublic Netherlands Norway Alberta(Canada) Flanders(Belgium) Australia UnitedStates Croatia Korea Average Russia Chile Israel NewZealand Malaysia England(UnitedKingdom) Romania CzechRepublic Singapore Shanghai(China) Access Participation %
  8. 8. Netherlands Romania Slovak Republic Bulgaria Iceland Georgial Brazil England (United Kingdom) Australia Alberta (Canada) Latvia Portugal Korea Average Shanghai (China) Spain Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates) Croatia Poland Mexico Chile Norway Finland Denmark Flanders (Belgium) Sweden Singapore Italy Estonia Israel Russia United States Japan Serbia France Malaysia 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Percentageofteachersworkinginschoolswherethe principalreportsthatmentoringprogrammesareavailable forallteachersintheschool Percentage of teachers who report presently having an assigned mentor to support them Czech Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 88 Not everywhere where principals say mentoring is available do teachers have mentors
  9. 9. 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Portugal Spain Georgia Chile Japan Mexico France Brazil Finland Cyprus Flanders(Belgium) Norway AbuDhabi(UnitedArabEmirates) Iceland Alberta(Canada) Australia Denmark Israel Korea Malaysia Italy UnitedStates Romania Bulgaria Croatia CzechRepublic Slovakia Shanghai(China) Serbia Latvia Netherlands Poland England(UnitedKingdom) NewZealand Singapore Estonia Russia Networks Autonomy Knowledge Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 99 Teacher professionalism index across TALIS systems
  10. 10. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Discussindividual students Shareresources Teamconferences Collaborateforcommon standards Teamteaching CollaborativePD Jointactivities Classroomobservations Percentageofteachers Average Shanghai (China) Professional collaboration Percentage of lower secondary teachers who report doing the following activities at least once per month Teacher co-operation10 Exchange and co-ordination
  11. 11. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 England(UK) Latvia Malaysia Estonia Singapore Netherlands Shanghai(China) Russia SlovakRepublic NewZealand CzechRepublic Brazil AbuDhabi(UAE) Japan Chile Mexico Croatia UnitedStates Average Romania Australia Georgia Norway Israel Alberta(Canada) Poland Spain Serbia Iceland Korea Portugal Flanders(Belgium) Italy Sweden Bulgaria Denmark France Finland Percentageofteachers School Management Principals Other teachers Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1111 Teachers feedback : direct classroom observations
  12. 12. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1212 Models of teacher professionalism High Peer Networks/ Low Autonomy High AutonomyKnowledge Emphasis Balanced Domains/ High Professionalism Balanced Domains/ Low Professionalism
  13. 13. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1313 Models of teacher professionalism High Peer Networks/ Low Autonomy High Autonomy Knowledge Emphasis Balanced Domains/ High Professionalism Balanced Domains/ Low Professionalism
  14. 14. Impact of teacher professionalism
  15. 15. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1515 Relationship between teacher professionalism and learning Relationship between PISA 2012 mathematics scores and teacher professionalism index (system-level) Dubai (UAE) Australia Flanders (Belgium) Bulgaria Brazil Alberta (Canada) Chile Shaghai (China) Czech RepublicDenmark England (UK) Spain EstoniaFinland France Croatia Iceland Israel Italy Japan Korea Latvia Mexico Malaysia Netherlands Norway New Zealand Poland Portugal Romania Russian Federation Singapore Serbia Slovak RepublicSweden 350 400 450 500 550 600 650 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 9.0 10.0 11.0 PISAmathematicsscore Teacher professionalism index R = 0.298
  16. 16. Status of the profession Teachers’ perception of the extent to which teaching is valued as a profession Satisfaction with the profession Teachers’ report on the extent to which teachers are happy with their decision to become a teacher. Satisfaction with work environment Teachers’ report on the extent to which teachers are happy with their current schools. Self-efficacy Teachers’ perception of their capabilities (e.g. controlling disruptive behaviour, use a variety of assessment strategies, etc.). 1 1616 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1616 Policy-relevant teacher outcomes
  17. 17. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Overall professionalism = 1 Overall professionalism = 5 Overall professionalism = 10 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1717 Teacher professionalism index and teacher outcomes The relationship between overall teacher professionalism and teacher outcomes Perceptions of teachers’ status Satisfaction with the profession Satisfaction with the work environment Teachers’ self-efficacy Predicted percentile
  18. 18. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Knowledge = 0 Knowledge = 5 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1818 Knowledge base index and teacher outcomes The relationship between knowledge base and teacher outcomes Perceptions of teachers’ status Satisfaction with the profession Satisfaction with the work environment Teachers’ self-efficacy Predicted percentile
  19. 19. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Networks = 0 Networks = 5 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1919 Peer networks index and teacher outcomes The relationship between peer networks and teacher outcomes Perceptions of teachers’ status Satisfaction with the profession Satisfaction with the work environment Teachers’ self-efficacy Predicted percentile
  20. 20. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Autonomy = 0 Autonomy = 5 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2020 Autonomy index and teacher outcomes The relationship between autonomy and teacher outcomes Perceptions of teachers’ status Satisfaction with the profession Satisfaction with the work environment Teachers’ self-efficacy Predicted percentile
  21. 21. 0.00 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.10 0.12 0.14 0.16 France Netherlands Estonia Georgia Norway Slovakia Portugal Sweden Japan Alberta(Canada) Italy Chile Croatia Denmark Iceland AbuDhabi(U.A.E.) Flanders(Belgium) Singapore Romania Brazil Serbia Latvia Bulgaria Israel NewZealand Australia CzechRepublic Finland Spain Mexico Russia Poland Korea Shanghai(China) England(U.K.) Malaysia Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2121 Country differences: Self efficacy Relationship between overall teacher professionalism and teachers’ self efficacy Coefficient size
  22. 22. 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 Georgia Iceland France Latvia Slovakia Romania Italy Japan Finland Norway Estonia Brazil Spain Portugal Serbia Russia Sweden Flanders(Belgium) Denmark Malaysia Mexico Alberta(Canada) CzechRepublic Croatia Korea Chile Netherlands Israel Bulgaria Poland NewZealand AbuDhabi(U.A.E.) Singapore Australia England(U.K.) Shanghai(China) Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2222 Country differences: Work environment Relationship between overall teacher professionalism and teachers’ satisfaction with work environment Coefficient size
  23. 23. Teacher professionalism and equity
  24. 24. 2 2424 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2424 Conceptualising high-needs schools School Low needs Medium needs High needs Percentage of students in high needs group (second-language learners, students with special needs and students that are socio -economically disadvantaged) Less than 11% of students 11 to 30% of students Greater than 30% of students
  25. 25. 2 2525 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2525 Socio-economically disadvantaged schools Teacher professionalism support gap and the percentage of schools that fall into the high socio-economically disadvantaged category Australia Flanders (Beligum) Alberta (Canada) Chile Czech RepublicDenmark Estonia Finland France Iceland Israel Italy Japan Korea Mexico Netherlands New Zealand Norway Poland Portugal Slovak Republic Spain Sweden England (UK) Brazil Bulgaria Croatia Georgia Latvia Malaysia Romania Russian Federation Serbia Shanghai (China) Singapore Dubai (UAE)) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 -0.4 -0.3 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 Highconcentration-economicallydisadvantaged Teacher professionalism support gap - economically disadvantaged
  26. 26. 2727 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2727 Knowledge domain in high and low socio-economically disadvantaged schools and teacher job satisfaction -0.40 -0.20 0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 Norway AbuDhabi(UAE) Israel Netherlands England(UK) Belgium(Flanders) Alberta(Canada) Italy Australia Serbia Croatia Shanghai(China) Spain Singapore Poland Malaysia SlovakRepublic Mexico Chile Estonia Brazil NewZealand Romania Latvia Portugal France Georgia Japan Sweden Korea Bulgaria Low High Association between satisfaction with current working environment and knowledge domain for each country separated by a high and low socio-economically disadvantaged concentration level. Unstandardisedcoefficients
  27. 27. 2828 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2828 Peer networks domain in high and low socio-economically disadvantaged schools and teacher job satisfaction -0.40 -0.20 0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 Bulgaria Australia Netherlands AbuDhabi(UAE) England(UK) NewZealand Serbia Singapore Estonia Croatia Chile Sweden Shanghai(China) Norway Belgium(Flanders) Mexico SlovakRepublic Brazil Alberta(Canada) Poland Portugal Malaysia Italy Spain France Korea Latvia Romania Israel Japan Georgia Low High Association between satisfaction with current working environment and peer networks domain for each country separated by a high and low socio-economically disadvantaged concentration level. Unstandardisedcoefficients
  28. 28. 2 2929 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2929 Equity in teacher professionalism support Most Equitable Mixed Equity Least Equitable England (United Kingdom) Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates) Croatia Korea Australia Estonia Latvia Flanders (Belgium) Israel Spain Brazil Malaysia Sweden Bulgaria Netherlands Alberta (Canada) Poland Chile Portugal Czech Republic Serbia Denmark Slovak Republic Finland France Georgia Iceland Italy Japan Mexico New Zealand Norway Romania The Russian Federation Shanghai (China) Singapore
  29. 29. Conclusions
  30. 30. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 3131 The importance of teacher professionalism Teachers in schools that adopt more practices related to improving teacher professionalism (especially teachers’ knowledge base and peer networks) feel: • more satisfied, • more capable (i.e. have higher feelings of self-efficacy), • that teaching professions has a higher status in the society.
  31. 31. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 3232 How can systems support teacher professionalism? Policies supporting teacher professionalism should consider: • requiring teachers to participate in pre-service formal teacher education programmes that expose teachers to pedagogy and provide opportunities to practice teaching; • expanding induction and mentoring programs; • supporting teachers in conducting classroom-based individual or collaborative research; • encouraging teachers’ participation in networks of other teachers for information exchange.
  32. 32. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 3333 How can systems support teacher professionalism? TALIS is a partnership between an international research consortium OECD Governments in 34 countries European Commission Teachers’ unions
  33. 33. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 34 • The report has been prepared by: Elizabeth Buckner (FHI 360) Christine Harris-Van Keuren (Education Policy Institute) Carina Omoeva (FHI 360) Under the oversight of OECD Secretariat William Smith (RESULTS Educational Fund) Charles Gale (FHI 360)

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