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Personalizing Learning for Gifted Kids

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Personalizing Learning for Gifted Kids

  1. 1. UTILIZING TECHNOLOGY TO PERSONALIZE LEARNING FOR GIFTED KIDS @brianhousand
  2. 2. Brian H E L L O My name is
  3. 3. NERD Someone who is passionate about learning, being smart, or academia.
  4. 4. GEEK Someone who is passionate about some particular area or subject, often an obscure or difficult one.
  5. 5. laughingsquid.com/nerd-venn-diagram-geek-dork-or-dweeb
  6. 6. GEEKSHAVE INHERITED THE EARTH
  7. 7. INTERESTS
  8. 8. I am interested in _______________.
  9. 9. TYPE III INDEPENDENT OR SMALL GROUP INVESTIGATIONS PRODUCTS AND/OR PERFORMANCES TYPE I GENERAL EXPLORATORY ACTIVITIES TYPE II METHODOLOGICAL TRAINING / HOW-TO ACTIVITIES (Renzulli, 1977)
  10. 10. roadtripnation.com/roadmap
  11. 11. roadtripnation.com/roadmap
  12. 12. WHAT ARE YOUR INTERESTS?
  13. 13. http://platformer.cdn.appadvice.com/wp-content/appadvice-v2-media/2016/03/Bracket_83bf350dc77194765fbee1d02505b2b8.jpg bit.ly/sem-tech-interest-bracket-copy
  14. 14. TODAY TOMORROW TO
  15. 15. brianhousand.com/personalizing
  16. 16. ACCESS
  17. 17. EXPLORE THE GARDEN EXPLORE THE GARDEN
  18. 18. LiveBinders bit.ly/contentbinder
  19. 19. CONTENT
  20. 20. CREATE
  21. 21. Summer 2013 T he admonition that we should be preparing our students for the 21st century is everywhere. There are numerous books, blogs, and content resources promoting and espousing the virtues of 21st cen- trace their origins back at least 30 years. In 1983, the Na- tional Science Board Commission on Precollege Education in Mathematics, Science and Technology published a report entitled, Educating Americans for the 21st Century: A Plan Quality Classroom Practice for High-Abillity Students Teaching for High Potential THPThe 21st Century is SO Yesterday Brian C. Housand, Ph.D. East Carolina University www.brianhousand.com Brian Housand is an Assistant Professor at East Carolina University in the department of Elementary Education. “The world is moving at a tremendous rate. No one knows where. We must prepare our children, not for the world of the past, not for our world, but for their world, the world of the future.” — John Dewey
  22. 22. CONSTRUCTING SYNTHESIS
  23. 23. Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn’t really do it, they just saw something. It seemed obvious to them after a while. That’s because they were able to connect experiences they’ve had and SYNTHESIZEnew things. - Steve Jobs, 1995
  24. 24. An idea is nothing more or less than a new combination of old elements. new combination old elements James Webb Young, 1940 A Technique for Producing Ideas
  25. 25. The capacity to bring old elements into new combinations depends largely on the ability to see relationships. new combination old elements James Webb Young, 1940 A Technique for Producing Ideas
  26. 26. (Resnick, 1996) NOT Stereos Pianos
  27. 27. code.org/learn
  28. 28. stemchallenge.org
  29. 29. stemchallenge.org
  30. 30. spark.adobe.com/features
  31. 31. spark.adobe.com/edu
  32. 32. designschool.canva.com
  33. 33. diy.org
  34. 34. #carpetdiem
  35. 35. hotshotpictures.weebly.com
  36. 36. “Gifted means you have abilities to do stuff others may not be able to do, even if they are not easy. This tree is growing in the shade under a step….that’s not easy.”
  37. 37. “As a gifted learner I feel that I am different; I am a leader; and I am powerful!”
  38. 38. “We all have an impact on the world. Although we’re small, someday we will do something great. It means to be inspiring, creative, helpful, and smart. Although being gifted has its problems, Being gifted is very special.”
  39. 39. “Giftedness is being different in your own way and to capture beautiful moments in life for something cool. Then your differences will shine!”
  40. 40. “Giftedness means you can be talented in some things but not at others; you swing back and forth at the things you are good at and the things you are not.”
  41. 41. apple.com/ibooks-author
  42. 42. apple.com/ibooks-author
  43. 43. apple.com/ibooks-author
  44. 44. tinyurl.com/patriotismibook
  45. 45. EXAMPLES & NONEXAMPLES
  46. 46. Go to menti.com and use code 61 77 0
  47. 47. STIMULATE INTEREST
  48. 48. http://academyartunews.com/newspaper/2015/04/selfie_vs_self-port.html Selfies vs. Self Portraits
  49. 49. 24,000,000,000
  50. 50. flickr.com/photos/averagejane/7624353692
  51. 51. THINK
  52. 52. Imposing limits can encourage a creative response. - Ed CatmUll
  53. 53. flickr five frames 1.Establish characters and location 2.Create a situation with possibilities 3.Involve the characters in the situation 4.Build to probable outcomes 5.Have a logical BUT surprising end
  54. 54. OPPORTUNITY
  55. 55. 1988
  56. 56. 3 2 1 Words Questions Metaphor
  57. 57. O pportunities R esources E ncouragement
  58. 58. CURRICULUM COMPACTING
  59. 59. What is Curriculum Compacting? • Streamlining the regular curriculum • Eliminating the repetition of previously mastered material • Upgrading the challenge level • Providing time for enrichment and/or acceleration activities while ensuring mastery of basic skills
  60. 60. When teachers eliminated as much as 50% of the curriculum, no differences were found between treatment and control groups. Reis, S. M., Westberg, K.L., Kulikowich, J., Caillard, F., Hébert, T., Plucker, J., Purcell, J.H., Rogers, J.B., & Smist, J.M. (1993). Why not let high ability students start school in January? The curriculum compacting study (Research Monograph 93106). Storrs, CT: The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, University of Connecticut.
  61. 61. Approximately 40-50% of traditional classroom material could be eliminated for targeted students. Reis, S. M., Westberg, K.L., Kulikowich, J., Caillard, F., Hébert, T., Plucker, J., Purcell, J.H., Rogers, J.B., & Smist, J.M. (1993). Why not let high ability students start school in January? The curriculum compacting study (Research Monograph 93106). Storrs, CT: The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, University of Connecticut.
  62. 62. GOALS FOR COMPACTING Create a challenging learning environment in the classroom Define objectives and guarantee proficiency in basic curriculum Find time for alternative learning activities based on advanced content and individual student interest
  63. 63. FOR STUDENTS, COMPACTING… • Recognizes large reservoir of knowledge • Satisfies hunger to learn more about self-selected topics • Encourages independence • Eliminates boredom resulting from unnecessary drill and practice
  64. 64. TWO TYPES OF COMPACTING Basic Skills Compacting Eliminates specific skills that students have already acquired. Spelling, mathematics, or grammar. Pre-testing is easier to accomplish. Mastery can be documented more easily and objectively.
  65. 65. Content Compacting Students may already know the objectives or may be able to read the material and master the objectives in a fraction of the time. More flexible – students can absorb the material at their own speed. Evaluation may be less formal – essays, interviews, or open ended tasks.
  66. 66. Student Behaviors Suggesting that Compacting May Be Necessary
  67. 67. Consistently finishes tasks quickly Finishes reading assignments first Appears bored during instruction time Brings in outside reading material Creates own puzzles, games, or diversions in class Consistently daydreams
  68. 68. Has consistently high performance in one or more academic areas Tests scores consistently excellent Asks questions that indicate advanced familiarity with material Is sought after by other students for assistance
  69. 69. Uses vocabulary and verbal expression advance of grade level Expresses interest in pursuing alternate or advanced topics.
  70. 70. The success of education depends on adapting teaching to individual differences among learners. Yuezheng 4th century B. C. Chinese treatise, Xue Ji
  71. 71. NAME__________________________________ AGE________ TEACHER(S) _______________________ SCHOOL _______________________________ GRADE_____ PARENT(S) ________________________ _______ _______ _______ _______ INDIVIDUAL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING GUIDE The Compactor CURRICULUM AREAS TO BE CONSIDERED FOR COMPACTING Provide a brief description of basic material to be covered during this marking period and the assessment information or evidence that suggests the need for compacting. Check here if additional information is recorded on the reverse side. Copyright © 1978 by Creative Learning Press, Inc. P.O. Box 320 Mansfield Center, CT 06250. All rights reserved. Individual Conference Dates And Persons Participating in Planning Of IEP Prepared by: Joseph S. Renzulli Linda M. Smith PROCEDURES FOR COMPACTING BASIC MATERIAL Describe activities that will be used to guarantee proficiency in basic curricular areas. ACCELERATION AND/OR ENRICHMENT ACTIVITIES Describe activities that will be used to provide advanced level learning experiences in each area of the regular curriculum. Name it. What material needs to be covered? What evidence shows a need for compacting? Change it. What enrichment and/or acceleration activities will be included? Independent Study Acceleration Mini-courses Honors Courses College Courses Mentorships Small Group Investigations Work Study Prove it. Exactly what material is to be excluded? How will you prove mastery?
  72. 72. How to Compact Step One: Identify the objectives in a given subject area.
  73. 73. Step One •Which objectives cannot be learned without formal or sustained instruction? •Which objectives reflect the priorities of the school district/state department of education?
  74. 74. How to Compact Step Two: Find or create appropriate pre-tests.
  75. 75. Step Two •Which objectives have already been mastered by the student? •Which objectives have not already been mastered by the student? •Which problems might be causing students to fall short of reaching any of the objectives?
  76. 76. How to Compact Step Three: Identify students who should be pre-tested.
  77. 77. Step Three •Look at the individual strengths of the students in your class. •Academic records, class performance, and evaluations from former teachers are all effective methods of pinpointing candidates for pre-testing.
  78. 78. How to Compact Step Four: Pre-test students to determine their mastery level of the chosen subjects.
  79. 79. Step Four •Point out that some students will already be familiar with the material. •Ask students individually, if they would like to “test out” of the unit by demonstrating that they already know the objectives being taught.
  80. 80. How to Compact Step Five: Eliminate instructional time for students who show mastery of the objectives.
  81. 81. Step Five •Students who have a thorough grasp of the learning objectives should be allowed to take part in enrichment or acceleration activities. •Some students may be excused from specific class sessions, while others may skip certain chapters or pages in the text or specific learning activities.
  82. 82. How to Compact Step Six: Streamline instruction of those objectives students have not yet mastered but are capable of mastering more quickly than their classmates.
  83. 83. Step Six •Bright students frequently need less practice to master new objectives than their peers. •Students may demonstrate mastery of some, but not ALL the target learning objectives.
  84. 84. 4 conditions to create individualized instruction 1. Work must be high quality. 2. Work must be appropriate to the students’ levels. 3. Students must be motivated to work on the tasks. 4. Students must have adequate time to learn.
  85. 85. How to Compact Step Seven: Offer challenging alternatives for time provided by compacting.
  86. 86. Step Seven •Assign individual or small group projects using contracts or management plans •Create interest or learning centers •Create opportunities for self-directed learning or decision making •Teach mini-courses on research topics or other high interest areas
  87. 87. How to Compact Step Eight: Keep records of this process and the instructional options available to compacted students.
  88. 88. Step Eight •Record student strength areas, as verified by test scores or performance •Save the pre-tests used to determine mastery and the learning objectives that were eliminated •Compile enrichment and acceleration activities
  89. 89. Base decisions about replacement activities on • The needs of the students • Time • Space • Resources • School policy • Support personnel
  90. 90. YOUR TURN Which students would benefit from Compacting? What might you do DIFFERENT for these students? What topics do students already know? What topics do students NOT already know?
  91. 91. YOUR TURN! Brainstorm implementation strategies for compacting in your classrooms. Where and how will you begin?
  92. 92. Recommendations for Implementation
  93. 93. Start the compacting process by targeting a small group of students for whom compacting seems especially appropriate.
  94. 94. Try different methods of pre-testing. Be flexible in accomplishing this by experimenting with different systems. Ask for assistance from other faculty members, aides, or volunteers. Decide in advance what score constitutes a pass.
  95. 95. Compact by unit, chapter, or topic rather than by time (marking period or quarter)
  96. 96. Decide how to document compacted material and define proficiency based on staff consensus and district policy.
  97. 97. Find a variety of alternatives Request help from all available resources in order to create a wide range of opportunities and alternatives to replace content that has been eliminated through compacting.
  98. 98. RESPONSIBILITY
  99. 99. With great power comes great responsibility
  100. 100. NEWS FLASH
  101. 101. LEFT TO THEIR OWN DEVICES
  102. 102. CRITICAL CONSUMERS RESPONSIBLE PRODUCERS
  103. 103. futurecasting.org
  104. 104. commonsense.org/educators
  105. 105. http://www.animationmagazine.net/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/Pixar-Creativity-Inc-post.jpg
  106. 106. FAILURE isn’t a necessary evil. In FACT, it isn’t EVIL at all. It is a NECESSARY consequence of doing something NEW. - Ed Catmull
  107. 107. Perfectionism PROCRASTINATION PARALYSIS
  108. 108. NO ONE - not Walt, not Steve, not the people of Pixar - ever achieved creative success by clinging to what used to work.
  109. 109. NECESSITY
  110. 110. PREPARING STUDENTS FOR THE FUTURE TODAY
  111. 111. “We don’t have the option of turning away from the future. No one gets to vote on whether technology is going to change our lives.” Bill Gates The Road Ahead
  112. 112. “Every generation of teenagers embraces the freedoms and possibilities wrought by technology in ways that shock the elders.”
  113. 113. ITECH
  114. 114. M E A N I N G
  115. 115. RIGOR
  116. 116. VIGOR
  117. 117. ACCESS CREATE OPPORTUNITY RESPONSIBILITY NECESSITY A C O R N
  118. 118. ACORN
  119. 119. From little acorns grow mighty oaks. From little acorns grow mighty oaks.
  120. 120. When each of us thinks about what we can do in life, chances are, we can do it because of a teacher. Stephen Hawking
  121. 121. BECOME A GREAT TEACHER
  122. 122. “I have come to believe that a great teacher is a great artist and that there are as few of these as there are of any other great artists. It might even be the greatest of the arts since the medium is the human mind and spirit.”
  123. 123. She breathed curiosity into us so that we brought in facts or truths shielded in our hands like captured fireflies.
  124. 124. LOVE WHAT YOU DO

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