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NCAGT 2020 - Visions of the Future: The Road Ahead for Gifted Ed

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NCAGT 2020 - Visions of the Future: The Road Ahead for Gifted Ed

  1. 1. VISIONS OF THE FUTURE THE ROAD AHEAD @BRIANHOUSAND FOR GIFTED ED
  2. 2. VISIONS OF THE FUTURE THE ROAD AHEAD @BRIANHOUSAND FOR GIFTED ED
  3. 3. @brianhousand@gmail.com @brianhousand.com @brianhousand
  4. 4. 2o2o WINTER TOUR JAN 21 CAPE FEAR CENTER FOR INQUIRY IN WILMINGTON, NC FEB 6-7 SPLENDORA ISD IN SPLENDORA,TX FEB 13 ROWAN-SALISBURY SCHOOLS IN SALISBURY, NC FEB 14 GASTON COUNTY SCHOOLS IN GASTONIA, NC FEB 20-21 NEBRASKA ASSOCIATION FOR THE GIFTED IN OMAHA, NE FEB 27-28 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS IN PHILADELPHIA, PA MAR 5-6 NC ASSOCIATION FOR GIFTED AND TALENTED IN WINSTON-SALEM, NC brianhousand.com/talks
  5. 5. 2 2
  6. 6. If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of GIANTS. Sir Isaac Newton
  7. 7. JAMES GALLAGHER DONALD TREFFINGER JAMES WEBB GEORGE BETTS JEROME BRUNER
  8. 8. Who controls the past controls the Future. who controls the present controls the past.
  9. 9. Leta S. Hollingworth May 25, 1886 November 27, 1939
  10. 10. The great problem of learning to SUFFER FOOLS GLADLY is one which many gifted persons never solve, as long as they live. Leta Stetter Hollingworth SUFFER FOOLS GLADLY
  11. 11. not sneeringly, not angrily, not despairingly, not weepingly--but gladly, if personal development is to proceed successfully in the world as it is. SUFFER FOOLS GLADLY The highly intelligent child must learn to Leta Stetter Hollingworth
  12. 12. Failure to learn how to tolerate in a reasonable fashion the foolishness of others less gifted leads to bitterness, disillusionment, and misanthropy, which are the ruin of potential leaders. Leta Stetter Hollingworth
  13. 13. I consider this one of the most important of all problems for the development of social science — the problem of how to recognize, educate, foster, and utilize the gifted young. Leta S. Hollingworth
  14. 14. RECOGNIZE
  15. 15. What does it mean to be GIFTED?
  16. 16. The Lost Colony Atlantis Area 51 Bigfoot Amelia Earhar
  17. 17. MYTHS, MISCONCEPTIONS, MISINFORMATION, & MISUNDERSTANDINGS
  18. 18. The only thing that any two gifted experts can agree upon is the incompetence of a third. Dr. Rick Courtright Duke TIP
  19. 19. It depends.
  20. 20. Different
  21. 21. RENZULLI’S TALENT POOL
  22. 22. TEST SCORE CRITERIA APPROXIMATELY 50% OF THE TALENT POOL STEP 1 Test Score Nominations (Automatic and Based on Local Norms) NON-TEST SCORE CRITERIA APPROXIMATELY 50% OF THE TALENT POOL STEP 2 Teacher Nominations (Automatic Except in Cases of Teachers Who Are Over or Under Nominators) STEP 3 Alternative Pathways STEP 4 Special Nominations STEP 5 Notification of Parents STEP 6 Action Information Nominations TotalTalentPoolConsistsofApproximately 15%oftheTotalSchoolPopulation Renzulli, J. S. (1990). A practical system for identifying gifted and talented students. Early Child Development and Care, 63, 9–18.
  23. 23. DOES YOUR FOOTBALL TEAM USE NATIONAL NORMS?
  24. 24. SPOILER ALERT
  25. 25. NORTH CAROLINA (NC) REPORT CARD LAWS The state of North Carolina mandates by law identifying and serving “academically or intellectually gifted students.” This mandate is partially funded. ACCESS Opportunity to Be Identified as Gifted Grade or Rank Notes and Explanation Access to Identification Rank A 7th 92.88% of students attend a school that identifies students with gifts and talents Rank among 50 states and DC in access Equity of Access Between Title I and Non- Title I Schools Rank F 38th Students in Title I schools are identified at 47% of the rate of those in Non-Title I schools (9.25% vs. 19.54% yields a ratio of 0.47 between Title I and Non-Title I schools). Rank among 50 states and DC in equity between Non-Title I and Title I schools Equity of Access by Race A A A A 0.99 AIAN 0.99 Black 1.02 Latinx 0.97 NHPI The ratio of race access to general access in schools that identify indicates whether students proportionally attend schools that identify. Ratios close to or greater than 1.00 means good access, so underrepresentation is not a function of lack of access. EQUITY Underserved Groups (in schools that identify) Category Statewide Grade—RI City Grade—RI Suburb Grade—RI Town Grade—RI Rural Grade—RI AIAN Equity Overall F–0.54 F–0.61 F–0.71 F–0.65 F–0.57 (n=18,534) Non-Title I F–0.71 F–0.67 F–0.79 B–0.94 F–0.59 Substantial population Title I F–0.67 F–0.62 D–0.83 F–0.67 F–0.64 Black Equity Overall F–0.40 F–0.40 F–0.35 F–0.42 F–0.41 (n=367,350) Non-Title I F–0.40 F–0.41 F–0.38 F–0.43 F–0.40 Title I F–0.44 F–0.46 F–0.38 F–0.44 F–0.43 Latinx Equity Overall F–0.44 F–0.40 F–0.39 F–0.57 F–0.47 (n=240,132) Non-Title I F–0.43 F–0.42 F–0.41 F–0.50 F–0.44 Title I F–0.49 F–0.45 F–0.47 F–0.60 F–0.51 NHPI Equity Overall F–0.69 F–0.53 F–0.76 F–0.63 D–0.84 (n=1,755) Non-Title I F–0.69 F–0.36 A–1.07 F–0.56 F–0.63 Substantial population Title I F–0.72 F–0.69 F–0.56 F–0.60 B–0.91 MISSINGNESS Students Missing From Gifted Education Identification: 25% at the Lower Boundary. Grade: Fail. Rank: 15 North Carolina identified 170,771 students as gifted in 2016. Statewide, the number of missing students in schools that do not identify and in schools that underidentify ranges from 56,739 to 133,773, (25% to 44%) with most of these missing students coming from Title I schools and from underserved populations. For example, 17,376 Black children are identified, with 29,973 to 60,727 (59% to 75%) missing. These numbers are detailed in Table 7 in the accompanying state report. SUMMARY Key Findings and Recommendations The good news is that more than 90% of North Carolina youth and more than 90% of North Carolina schools identify students for gifted education services. Additionally, any underrepresentation noted is not due to lack of access to identification either by race of type of school attended. However, despite these positive findings, disproportionality exists in North Carolina between Title I and Non-Title I schools, with Title I schools identifying less than half the percentage of students as their Non-Title I counterparts. Additionally, Black, Latinx, and to some extent AIAN children are severely underrepresented in North Carolina regardless of school type or locale. Because of this disproportionality, large numbers of these youth are missing from identification. Clearly North Carolina needs to examine policies and practices and determine which of these has impacted identification and led to inequity among races and between Title I and Non-Title I schools. AIAN=American Indian or Alaska Native, NHPI=Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander Gifted Education in the United States Gentry, M., Gray, A., Whiting, G. W., Maeda, Y., & Pereira, N. (2019). Access denied/System failure: Gifted education in the United States: Laws, access, equity, and missingness across the country by locale, Title I school status, and race. Report Cards, Technical Report, and Website. Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN; Jack Kent Cooke Foundation: Lansdowne, VA.
  26. 26. NORTH CAROLINA (NC) REPORT CARD LAWS The state of North Carolina mandates by law identifying and serving “academically or intellectually gifted students.” This mandate is partially funded. ACCESS Opportunity to Be Identified as Gifted Grade or Rank Notes and Explanation Access to Identification Rank A 7th 92.88% of students attend a school that identifies students with gifts and talents Rank among 50 states and DC in access Equity of Access Between Title I and Non- Title I Schools Rank F 38th Students in Title I schools are identified at 47% of the rate of those in Non-Title I schools (9.25% vs. 19.54% yields a ratio of 0.47 between Title I and Non-Title I schools). Rank among 50 states and DC in equity between Non-Title I and Title I schools Equity of Access by Race A A A A 0.99 AIAN 0.99 Black 1.02 Latinx 0.97 NHPI The ratio of race access to general access in schools that identify indicates whether students proportionally attend schools that identify. Ratios close to or greater than 1.00 means good access, so underrepresentation is not a function of lack of access. Underserved Groups Statewide City Suburb Town Rural Gifted Education in the United States
  27. 27. 56,739 TO 133,773 AIG STUDENTS MOSTLY FROM TITLE I SCHOOLS 93%Of NC’s students attend a school where identification takes place.
  28. 28. 56,739 TO 133,773 AIG STUDENTS MOSTLY FROM TITLE I SCHOOLS 47% Students in title I schools are identified at Of the rate of those in non-title I schools.
  29. 29. FIND YOUR KIDS THAT ARE DIFFERENT, & GIVE THEM SOMETHING DIFFERENT.
  30. 30. EDUCATE
  31. 31. 20/15 20/13 20/10
  32. 32. When each of us thinks about what we can do in life, chances are, we can do it because of a teacher. Stephen Hawking
  33. 33. FEBRUARY | 2020 Foreword and Executive Summary by Amber M. Northern and Michael J. Petrilli By Seth Gershenson TheImpactofRigorousGrading PracticesonStudentAchievement
  34. 34. FINDING 1: Students learn more from teachers who have higher grading standards. FEBRUARY | 2020 Foreword and Executive Summary by Amber M. Northern and Michael J. Petrilli By Seth Gershenson TheImpactofRigorousGrading PracticesonStudentAchievement
  35. 35. FINDING 2: Teachers with higher grading standards improve their students’ performance in subsequent math classes up to two years later. FEBRUARY | 2020 Foreword and Executive Summary by Amber M. Northern and Michael J. Petrilli By Seth Gershenson TheImpactofRigorousGrading PracticesonStudentAchievement
  36. 36. FINDING 3: Teachers with higher grading standards significantly improve the learning outcomes of all student subgroups.FEBRUARY | 2020 Foreword and Executive Summary by Amber M. Northern and Michael J. Petrilli By Seth Gershenson TheImpactofRigorousGrading PracticesonStudentAchievement
  37. 37. OUR HOPETHE REALITY
  38. 38. AUGUST 11, 2019 U.S. National Gymnastics Championships Kansas City, MO
  39. 39. OCTOBER 13, 2019 World Artistic Gymnastics Championships Stuttgart, Germany
  40. 40. OCTOBER 16, 2019 World Artistic Gymnastics Championships Stuttgart, Germany
  41. 41. A RISING TIDE LIFTS ALL SHIPS
  42. 42. FOSTER
  43. 43. foster verb encourage or promote the development of something.
  44. 44. HOW DO THEY GO SO FAST? HOW DO THEY GO SO FAST?
  45. 45. WHO’S IN YOUR PIT CREW?
  46. 46. CONTROLLED CHAOS IT’S
  47. 47. CONTROLLED CHAOS BUT ALL OF THE TIME MOST OF THE TIME
  48. 48. REMEMBER THEY LEARN FAST
  49. 49. But…
  50. 50. THE IMPORTANCE OF Failure
  51. 51. (RENZULLI, 1978) TASK COMMITMENT represents energy that is brought to bear upon a particular problem (task) or specific performance area. TASK COMMITMENT CREATIVITY ABOVE AVERAGE ABILITY
  52. 52. JUST KEEP SWIMMING! JUST KEEP SWIMMING! JUST KEEP SWIMMING! JUST KEEP SWIMMING! JUST KEEP SWIMMING! JUST KEEP SWIMMING! JUST KEEP SWIMMING! JUST KEEP SWIMMING! JUST KEEP SWIMMING!
  53. 53. UTILIZE
  54. 54. GIFTED KID OR SUPERHERO?
  55. 55. DON’T HOLD GIFTED KIDS BACK
  56. 56. EMPOWER
  57. 57. EMPOWER
  58. 58. not sneeringly, not angrily, not despairingly, not weepingly--but gladly, if personal development is to proceed successfully in the world as it is. SUFFER FOOLS GLADLY The highly intelligent child must learn to Leta Stetter Hollingworth
  59. 59. Instead of preparing kids for our future, Why don’t we EMPOWER them to create their own?
  60. 60. LEAD
  61. 61. In gifted education, we seek to meet the advanced learning needs of students all day, every day. However, inequities rooted in larger society plague education, often leading to inequitable representation in gifted programs. Although schools cannot fix larger societal inequities on their own, we can ensure that our actions do not compound these inequities. Our goal must be to promote both equity and excellence. We must take actions to increase access and opportunity, which increases achievement and growth for all. We must assure that student racial, ethnic, economic, or other demographic factors do not reduce their likelihood of access and successful participation in advanced programming. By realizing equity and excellence in gifted education, schools will help all students reach their full potential. What is Equity and Excellence in Gifted Education? What is it not? • It is not about ‘status’ or sacrificing needs of one group of students for another; it is meeting the needs of all students. • It is not seeing students at-risk; it is seeing students at-potential.* • It is not having multiple hoops to show a student’s perfection in everything; it is about multiple opportunities for students to demonstrate their potential. • It is not providing the same services to all; it is adjusting services based on demonstrated needs of students. • It is not about all students receiving the same content at the same time at the same pace; it is about personalized learning. • It is not about putting up barriers and hurdles; it is about expanding access and opportunities. • It is not based on a national comparison for local programs; it is based on local context and data. • It is not only recognizing students who come with easily recognizable gifts and talents; it is about being a talent scout and intentionally creating environments to recognize and develop talents not yet tapped. Critical Actions to Realize Equity and Excellence in Gifted Education Changing Mindsets, Policies and Practices To set the foundation for realizing both equity and excellence, we must approach it from the shared perspective that both can be realized. Both are integral to a successful educational environment. This commitment toward equity and excellence is urgent and requires intentional and sustained actions. No single action will change mindsets, policies, and practices; we must synergize efforts to increase achievement and growth for all. ACTION 1: Reframe your Lens We must reframe our lens on how we view students, their actions and beliefs; how we view schools, our actions and goals; and how we view ourselves, our roles and responsibilities. How? Reflect on our own biases, stories, and influence. Connect with student experiences. View students as “at-potential” versus “at-risk.”* Be a talent scout not a deficit detector. Look for opportunities to say yes, not opportunities to say no. Why? By reframing our lens, we ensure that all students have an equitable opportunity to access gifted programs. We begin to change our mindsets, raise expectations, and begin the pathway toward equity and excellence. ACTION 2: Use Equitable Identification Practices We must provide opportunities for every student to show us their strengths and talents and mitigate systemic barriers to access gifted education. How? Align identification practices with the services provided. Use universal screening and referral practices. Use local norms and context for local programs. Take advantage of existing student data and a variety of information sources. Provide multiple opportunities, not multiple barriers. Why? By improving identification practices, we focus on recognizing demonstrated advanced learning needs so that no potential is untapped and no student is overlooked for gifted education. Critical Actions to Realize Equity and Excellence in Gifted Education Changing Mindsets, Policies, and Practices Increase access and opportunities to increase achievement and growth for all CALL TO ACTION ACTION 3: Provide a Range of Services within the Program We must match the educational environment with each student’s demonstrated educational needs. Gifted services must adjust to the student instead of the student adjusting to the services. How? Provide differentiation in the regular classroom, but that will be insufficient for some students. Offer a variety of services in a variety of settings. Accelerate, extend, and enrich learning experiences. Heed academic, social, emotional, and cognitive needs. Why? By providing a range of services, we respond to the range of needs and we teach students only what they don’t already know so that they will optimally develop, all day, every day. ACTION 4: Foster Talent Development We must also cultivate potential in students whose strengths are not yet tapped or readily observable in typical classroom environments, in addition to serving students who are already demonstrating high performance. We must provide intentional efforts that bring out and develop a student’s strengths and talents. How? Create learning environments where teachers are able to observe student strengths and recognize potential. Respond by developing a student’s strengths through intentional learning experiences in various domains. Provide early intervention and development opportunities to maximize potential. Why? By fostering talent development, we will ensure that all students have opportunities to grow and experience learning environments that are not dependent on their background or economic means. ACTION 5: Collect and Use Meaningful Data We must seek out and be responsive to meaningful data so that we align information with actions and aspirations. How? Begin with the end in mind. Form a team to gather expertise and existing data. Use your program vision and goals to determine relevant data to analyze. Collect new data to fill gaps. Disaggregate the data and look at patterns and trends over time. Share information to inform mindsets, policies, and practices. Why? By collecting and using meaningful data, we will assess program success and inform program improvement. We will determine if the right interventions are being used in the right way, at the right time, to meet each student’s needs. ACTION 6: Provide Focused Professional Learning Opportunities We must provide a clear focus on the above critical actions in professional learning opportunities to realize equity and excellence in gifted education. How? Facilitate professional development in a variety of settings and modes. Involve all -- the total school community, including partners in and out of school. Develop shared ownership to synergize efforts. Focus on changing mindsets, policies, and practices. Why? By providing focused professional development, we remove systemic barriers, improve student services, share ownership and move closer to equity and excellence in gifted education. *Coleman, M.R., Shah-Coltrane, S., & Harrison, A. (2010). U-STARS~PLUS: Teacher’s observation of potential in students: Individual student form. Arlington, VA: Council of Exceptional Children. For more information: Visit NCDPI at http://www.ncpublicschools.org/advancedlearning/aig/ or contact Sneha.ShahColtrane@dpi.nc.gov For more information: Visit Duke TIP at www.tip.duke.edu/equityandexcellence This initiative is aligned with the #NC2030 plan and the State Board of Education goals.
  62. 62. RECOGNIZE EDUCATE FOSTER UTILIZE EMPOWER LEAD
  63. 63. RECOGNIZE EDUCATE FOSTER UTILIZE EMPOWER LEAD
  64. 64. @brianhousand@gmail.com @brianhousand.com/ncagt2020 @brianhousand

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