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NAG 2020 - Gifted - Honestly, it's not for everyone.

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NAG 2020 - Gifted - Honestly, it's not for everyone.

  1. 1. HONESTLY, IT’S NOT FOR EVERYONE. GIFTED:
  2. 2. @brianhousand@gmail.com @brianhousand.com @brianhousand
  3. 3. SLIDES AVAILABLE AFTER THE PRESENTATION
  4. 4. Brian H E L L O My name is
  5. 5. 2o2o WINTER TOUR JAN 21 CAPE FEAR CENTER FOR INQUIRY IN WILMINGTON, NC FEB 6-7 SPLENDORA ISD IN SPLENDORA,TX FEB 13 ROWAN-SALISBURY SCHOOLS IN SALISBURY, NC FEB 14 GASTON COUNTY SCHOOLS IN GASTONIA, NC FEB 20-21 NEBRASKA ASSOCIATION FOR THE GIFTED IN OMAHA, NE FEB 27-28 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS IN PHILADELPHIA, PA MAR 5-6 NC ASSOCIATION FOR GIFTED AND TALENTED IN WINSTON-SALEM, NC brianhousand.com/talks
  6. 6. FIND YOUR PEEPS
  7. 7. WORLD PREMIERE
  8. 8. http://www.fanpop.com/clubs/wall-e/images/6412320/title/wall-e-wallpaper-wallpaper “We want to do something that is new, original — something where there’s a good chance of failure.”
  9. 9. HONESTLY, IT’S NOT FOR EVERYONE.
  10. 10. HONESTLY, IT’S NOT FOR EVERYONE. GIFTED:
  11. 11. GIFTED: Honestly, it’s not for everyone. BRIAN’S NOTES on
  12. 12. SHOULD WOULD COULD X X X
  13. 13. THE END.
  14. 14. 2 2
  15. 15. If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of GIANTS. Sir Isaac Newton
  16. 16. Who controls the past controls the Future. who controls the present controls the past.
  17. 17. Leta S. Hollingworth May 25, 1886 November 27, 1939
  18. 18. Leta S. Hollingworth May 25, 1886 November 27, 1939
  19. 19. I consider this one of the most important of all problems for the development of social science — the problem of how to recognize, educate, foster, and utilize the gifted young. Leta S. Hollingworth
  20. 20. RECOGNIZE
  21. 21. The Lost Colony Atlantis Area 51 Bigfoot Amelia Earhar
  22. 22. What does it mean to be GIFTED?
  23. 23. MYTHS, MISCONCEPTIONS, MISINFORMATION, & MISUNDERSTANDINGS
  24. 24. The only thing that any two gifted experts can agree upon is the incompetence of a third. Dr. Rick Courtright Duke TIP
  25. 25. What is gifted? Well, we don’t really have a definition that we agree on.
  26. 26. Well, we aren’t sure. How many gifted kids are there?
  27. 27. Could you give us some $$$?
  28. 28. It depends.
  29. 29. Different
  30. 30. RENZULLI’S TALENT POOL
  31. 31. TEST SCORE CRITERIA APPROXIMATELY 50% OF THE TALENT POOL STEP 1 Test Score Nominations (Automatic and Based on Local Norms) NON-TEST SCORE CRITERIA APPROXIMATELY 50% OF THE TALENT POOL STEP 2 Teacher Nominations (Automatic Except in Cases of Teachers Who Are Over or Under Nominators) STEP 3 Alternative Pathways STEP 4 Special Nominations STEP 5 Notification of Parents STEP 6 Action Information Nominations TotalTalentPoolConsistsofApproximately 15%oftheTotalSchoolPopulation Renzulli, J. S. (1990). A practical system for identifying gifted and talented students. Early Child Development and Care, 63, 9–18.
  32. 32. DOES YOUR FOOTBALL TEAM USE NATIONAL NORMS?
  33. 33. SPOILER ALERT
  34. 34. NEBRASKA (NE) REPORT CARD LAWS The state of Nebraska mandates by law identifying but not serving “learners with high ability.” This mandate is partially funded. ACCESS Opportunity to Be Identified as Gifted Grade or Rank Notes and Explanation Access to Identification Rank B 17th 83.19% of students attend a school that identifies students with gifts and talents Rank among 50 states and DC in access Equity of Access Between Title I and Non- Title I Schools Rank F 42nd Students in Title I schools are identified at 42% of the rate of those in Non-Title I schools (7.29% vs. 17.38% yields a ratio of 0.42 between Title I and Non-Title I schools). Rank among 50 states and DC in equity between Non-Title I and Title I schools Equity of Access by Race F A A A 0.68 AIAN 1.08 Black 1.02 Latinx 0.99 NHPI The ratio of race access to general access in schools that identify indicates whether students proportionally attend schools that identify. Ratios close to or greater than 1.00 means good access, so underrepresentation is not a function of lack of access. EQUITY Underserved Groups (in schools that identify) Category Statewide Grade—RI City Grade—RI Suburb Grade—RI Town Grade—RI Rural Grade—RI AIAN Equity Overall F–0.45 F–0.36 F–0.54 F–0.50 F–0.51 (n=2,529) Non-Title I F–0.40 F–0.34 F–0.51 F–0.48 F–0.47 Substantial population Title I F–0.74 F–0.56 B–0.92 F–0.55 F–0.71 Black Equity Overall F–0.49 F–0.47 F–0.38 F–0.46 F–0.62 (n=19,749) Non-Title I F–0.48 F–0.44 F–0.37 F–0.53 F–0.60 Title I F–0.67 F–0.72 F–0.63 F–0.42 F–0.37 Latinx Equity Overall F–0.51 F–0.51 F–0.67 F–0.48 F–0.46 (n=48,504) Non-Title I F–0.50 F–0.47 F–0.74 F–0.43 F–0.46 Title I F–0.79 B–0.93 A–1.04 F–0.70 F–0.49 NHPI Equity Overall F–0.67 C–0.88 F–0.50 F–0.69 F–0.17 (n=394) Non-Title I F–0.57 F–0.78 F–0.50 F–0.42 F–0.22 Title I A–1.01 A–1.31 F–0.00 A–1.58 F–0.00 MISSINGNESS Students Missing From Gifted Education Identification: 26% at the Lower Boundary. Grade: Fail. Rank: 17 Nebraska identified 35,778 students as gifted in 2016. Statewide, the number of missing students in schools that do not identify and in schools that underidentify ranges from 12,271 to 19,419, (26% to 35%) with most of these missing students coming from Title I schools and from underserved populations. For example, 154 AIAN children are identified, with 453 to 623 (75% to 80%) missing. These numbers are detailed in Table 7 in the accompanying state report. SUMMARY Key Findings and Recommendations Despite a mandate to identify students with gifts and talents, only 83% of Nebraska’s students attend schools in which identification takes place. Further, inequity exists between Non-Title I and Title I schools regarding percentage of students identified, with Non-Title I schools identifying more than double the percentage students identified in Title I schools. RIs by race and locale show underrepresentation of AIAN, Black, and Latinx students who are identified on average at about half thee rate that would be equitable (0.45, 0.51, 0.49, respectively). These data make it clear that Nebraska needs to reform policy and procedures concerning access, equity, and identification in gifted education statewide. Note. A blank indicates there are no students in that setting from this group; a zero indicated that although there are students in this setting none are identified with gifts and talents. AIAN=American Indian or Alaska Native, NHPI=Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander Gifted Education in the United States Gentry, M., Gray, A., Whiting, G. W., Maeda, Y., & Pereira, N. (2019). Access denied/System failure: Gifted education in the United States: Laws, access, equity, and missingness across the country by locale, Title I school status, and race. Report Cards, Technical Report, and Website. Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN; Jack Kent Cooke Foundation: Lansdowne, VA.
  35. 35. NEBRASKA (NE) REPORT CARD LAWS The state of Nebraska mandates by law identifying but not serving “learners with high ability.” This mandate is partially funded. ACCESS Opportunity to Be Identified as Gifted Grade or Rank Notes and Explanation Access to Identification Rank B 17th 83.19% of students attend a school that identifies students with gifts and talents Rank among 50 states and DC in access Equity of Access Between Title I and Non- Title I Schools Rank F 42nd Students in Title I schools are identified at 42% of the rate of those in Non-Title I schools (7.29% vs. 17.38% yields a ratio of 0.42 between Title I and Non-Title I schools). Rank among 50 states and DC in equity between Non-Title I and Title I schools Equity of Access by Race F A A A 0.68 AIAN 1.08 Black 1.02 Latinx 0.99 NHPI The ratio of race access to general access in schools that identify indicates whether students proportionally attend schools that identify. Ratios close to or greater than 1.00 means good access, so underrepresentation is not a function of lack of access. Underserved Groups Statewide City Suburb Town Rural Gifted Education in the United States
  36. 36. 12,271 TO 19,419 HIGH ABILITY LEARNERS MOSTLY FROM TITLE I SCHOOLS 83%Of Nebraska’s students attend a school where identification takes place.
  37. 37. FIND YOUR KIDS THAT ARE DIFFERENT, & GIVE THEM SOMETHING DIFFERENT.
  38. 38. RECOGNIZE
  39. 39. EDUCATE
  40. 40. When each of us thinks about what we can do in life, chances are, we can do it because of a teacher. Stephen Hawking
  41. 41. FEBRUARY | 2020 Foreword and Executive Summary by Amber M. Northern and Michael J. Petrilli By Seth Gershenson TheImpactofRigorousGrading PracticesonStudentAchievement
  42. 42. FINDING 1: Students learn more from teachers who have higher grading standards. FEBRUARY | 2020 Foreword and Executive Summary by Amber M. Northern and Michael J. Petrilli By Seth Gershenson TheImpactofRigorousGrading PracticesonStudentAchievement
  43. 43. FINDING 2: Teachers with higher grading standards improve their students’ performance in subsequent math classes up to two years later. FEBRUARY | 2020 Foreword and Executive Summary by Amber M. Northern and Michael J. Petrilli By Seth Gershenson TheImpactofRigorousGrading PracticesonStudentAchievement
  44. 44. FINDING 3: Teachers with higher grading standards significantly improve the learning outcomes of all student subgroups.FEBRUARY | 2020 Foreword and Executive Summary by Amber M. Northern and Michael J. Petrilli By Seth Gershenson TheImpactofRigorousGrading PracticesonStudentAchievement
  45. 45. 20/15 20/13 20/10
  46. 46. OUR HOPETHE REALITY
  47. 47. AUGUST 11, 2019 U.S. National Gymnastics Championships Kansas City, MO
  48. 48. OCTOBER 13, 2019 World Artistic Gymnastics Championships Stuttgart, Germany
  49. 49. OCTOBER 16, 2019 World Artistic Gymnastics Championships Stuttgart, Germany
  50. 50. A RISING TIDE LIFTS ALL SHIPS
  51. 51. EDUCATE
  52. 52. FOSTER
  53. 53. foster verb encourage or promote the development of something.
  54. 54. HOW DO THEY GO SO FAST? HOW DO THEY GO SO FAST?
  55. 55. WHO’S IN YOUR PIT CREW?
  56. 56. CONTROLLED CHAOS IT’S
  57. 57. CONTROLLED CHAOS BUT ALL OF THE TIME MOST OF THE TIME
  58. 58. REMEMBER THEY LEARN FAST
  59. 59. But…
  60. 60. FAILURE Is a necessary E V I L
  61. 61. FAILURE In FACT, it isn’t EVIL at all. It is a NECESSARY - Ed Catmull isn’t a necessary evil. consequence of doing something NEW.
  62. 62. THE IMPORTANCE OF Failure
  63. 63. (RENZULLI, 1978) TASK COMMITMENT represents energy that is brought to bear upon a particular problem (task) or specific performance area. TASK COMMITMENT CREATIVITY ABOVE AVERAGE ABILITY
  64. 64. JUST KEEP SWIMMING! JUST KEEP SWIMMING! JUST KEEP SWIMMING! JUST KEEP SWIMMING! JUST KEEP SWIMMING! JUST KEEP SWIMMING! JUST KEEP SWIMMING! JUST KEEP SWIMMING! JUST KEEP SWIMMING!
  65. 65. UTILIZE
  66. 66. WHAT MAKES A SUPERHERO?
  67. 67. DON’T HOLD GIFTED KIDS BACK
  68. 68. EMPOWER
  69. 69. LEAD
  70. 70. SHOULD WOULD COULD X X X
  71. 71. RECOGNIZE EDUCATE FOSTER UTILIZE EMPOWER LEAD
  72. 72. RECOGNIZE EDUCATE FOSTER UTILIZE EMPOWER LEAD
  73. 73. @brianhousand@gmail.com @brianhousand.com/nag2020 @brianhousand
  74. 74. LACK OF EXPERIENCES GREEN EGGS AND HAM
  75. 75. FASTER
  76. 76. FASTER DEEPER
  77. 77. OXO
  78. 78. “Perhaps the arts of “benign chicanery “are absolutely necessary “to a child of highest “intelligence, “compelled to find his “spiritual way through “mass education.” Leta Hollingworth
  79. 79. I CAN CLEARLY SEE
  80. 80. I CAN CLEARLY SEE
  81. 81. I CAN CLEARLY SEE
  82. 82. SMART ≠ +
  83. 83. ZIP CODES
  84. 84. Gifted Education has a long history of championing instructional practices that integrate creativity, innovation, differentiation, and academic vigor. Yet, in 2020 what was once the cutting edge and the dominion of the gifted classroom are common practices in many regular classrooms. If gifted education is to remain meaningful and relevant, we need to unite and create clear vision of what we want the world of tomorrow to hold for us. We need to peer into the crystal ball and envision a series of possible futures and outcomes for gifted education.
  85. 85. It doesn’t matter what you call it.

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