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MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
Unit 8
Solution Procedures
Readings:

R Ch. 4

T & G 17, Ch. 3 (18-26)

Ch. 4 (27-46)

Ch. 6 (54-73)

Paul A. Lagace, Ph.D.

Professor of Aeronautics & Astronautics

and Engineering Systems

Paul A. Lagace © 2001
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
Summarizing what we’ve looked at in elasticity, we have:
15 equations in 15 unknowns
- 3 equilibrium - 6 strains
- 6 strain-displacement - 3 displacements
- 6 stress-strain - 6 stresses
These must be solved for a generic body under some generic loading
subject to the prescribed boundary conditions (B.C.’s)
There are two types of boundary conditions:
1. Normal (stress prescribed)
2.	 Geometric (displacement prescribed)
--> you must have one or the other
To solve this system of equations subject to such constraints over the
continuum of a generic body is, in general, quite a challenge. There are
basically two solution procedures:
1. Exact -- satisfy all the equations and the B.C.’s
2. Numerical -- come as “close as possible” (energy methods, etc.)
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 2
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
Let’s consider “exact” techniques. A common, and classic, one is:
Stress Functions
•	 Relate six stresses to (fewer) functions defined in such a manner
that they identically satisfy the equilibrium conditon
• Can be done for 3-D case
• Can be done for anisotropic (most often orthotropic) case
--> See: Lekhnitskii, Anisotropic Plates,
Gordan & Breach, 1968.
--> Let’s consider
• plane stress
•	 (eventually) isotropic
8 equations in 8 unknowns
- 2 equilibrium - 3 strains
- 3 strain-displacement - 2 displacements
- 3 stress-strain - 3 stresses
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 3
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
Define the “Airy” Stress Function = φ(x, y)
English a scalar
mathematician
∂2
φ
σxx = 2
+ V (8 -1)
∂y
∂2
φ
σyy =
∂x2
+ V (8 - 2)
2
φ
σxy = −
∂
(8 - 3)
x y
∂ ∂
where: V = potential function for body forces fx and fy
fx = −
∂V
fy = −
∂V
∂x ∂y
V exists if
∇ x f = 0 (curl)
that is:	
∂fx
=
∂fy
∂y ∂x
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 4
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
Recall that curl f = 0 ⇒ “conservative” field
- gravity forces
- spring forces
- etc.
What does that compare to in fluids?
Irrotational flow
Look at how φ has been defined and what happens if we place these
equations (8-1 - 8-3) into the plane stress equilibrium equations:
∂σxx
+
∂σxy
+ fx = 0 (E1)
∂x ∂y
∂σ ∂σ
xy yy
∂x
+
∂y
+ fy = 0 (E2)
we then get:
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 5

∂ ∂ ∂ ∂
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
2
∂  ∂2
φ
E1
( ) :  2
+V 

+
∂


−
∂ φ 
 −
∂V
= 0 ?
x
∂x  ∂y  ∂y  ∂ ∂y ∂x
∂3
φ
+
∂V
−
∂3
φ
−
∂ V
= 0 (yes)
⇒
∂ ∂ x y
x y2
∂x ∂ ∂ 2
∂x
2
∂


−
∂ φ  ∂  ∂2
φ
(E2) :
∂x  ∂ ∂y


+
∂y 

∂x2
+ V



−
∂V = 0 ?
x ∂y
∂3
φ
+
∂3
φ
+
∂ V −
∂ V= 0 (yes)
⇒ 2 2
x y x y ∂y ∂y
⇒Equilibrium automatically satisfied
using Airy stress function!
Does that mean that any function we pick for φ (x, y) will be valid?
No, it will satisfy equilibrium, but we still have the strain-displacement
and stress-strain equations. If we use these, we can get to the
governing equation:
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 6
(E
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
Step 1: Introduce φ into the stress-strain equations (compliance form):
1
E3
εxx =
E
(σxx − νσyy ) ( )
1
εyy = (−νσxx + σyy ) (E4)
E
εxy =
2 (1
E
+ ν)
σxy (E5)
So:
εxx =	
1  ∂2
φ
− ν
∂2
φ
+
(1 − ν)
V (E3′)
E 

∂y2
∂x2 
 E
εyy =	
1  ∂2
φ
− ν
∂2
φ
+
(1 − ν)
V (E4′)
E 

∂x2
∂y2


E
εxy = −
2 (1 + ν)	 ∂2
φ
(E5′)
x y
E ∂ ∂
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 7
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
Step 2: Use these in the plane stress compatibility equation:
∂2
εxx
∂2
εyy ∂2
εxy
+	 =
x y
∂y2
∂x2
∂ ∂
(E6)
⇒ we get quite a mess! After some rearranging and
manipulation, this results in:
V V
∂
∂
+
∂
∂ ∂
+
∂
∂
=
−
∂ ( )
∂
+
∂ ( )
∂






− ( )
∂
∂
+
∂
∂






4
4
4
2
2
4
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
φ φ
α
x y y
E
T
x
T
y y
2
∆
−
2
φ
ν
x
x
∆
(*)
temperature term we
haven’t yet considered
α = coefficient of thermal expansion
∆T = temperature differential
This is the basic equation for isotropic plane
stress in Stress Function form
Recall: φ is a scalar
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 8
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
If we recall a little mathematics, the Laplace Operator in 2-D is:
∇2 ∂2
∂2
= +
∂x2
∂y2
∂4
∂4
∂4
⇒ ∇2
∇2
= ∇4
=
∂x4
+ 2 2 2
+
∂y4
x
∂ ∂y
This is the biharmonic operator (also used in fluids)
So the (*) equation can be written:
∇4φ = −Eα∇2
(∆T) − (1 − ν) ∇2
V (*)
Finally, in the absence of temperature effects and body forces this
becomes:
∇4
φ = 0 homogeneous form
What happened to E, ν??
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 9
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
⇒ this function, and accompanying governing equation, could
be defined in any curvilinear system (we’ll see one such
example later) and in plane strain as well.
But…what’s this all useful for???
This may all seem like “magic”. Why were the σ’s assumed as they
were?
This is not a direct solution to a posed problem, per se, but is known
as…
The Inverse Method
In general, for cases of plane stress without body force or temp (∇4
φ = 0):
1.	 A stress function φ (x, y) is assumed that satisfies the
biharmonic equation
2.	 The stresses are determined from the stress function as
defined in equations (8-1) - (8-3)
3. Satisfy the boundary conditions (of applied tractions)
4. Find the (structural) problem that this satisfies
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 10
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
• Mathematicians actually did this and created many solutions. So
there are many stress functions that have been found to solve
specific structural problems
(see, for example, Rivello, pp, 72-73 also T & G)
•	 These are linear solutions and thus the “Principle of
Superposition” applies such that these can be combined to solve
any particular problem
•	 The inverse method yields an exact solution. In real life, an exact
solution generally cannot be obtained. We often “notch it down
one” and resort to the…
The Semi-Inverse Method
This is basically the same as the Inverse Method except that the solution
is not exact in that we…
• Make simplifying assumptions to get solvable equations. These
can be with regard to:
– stress components
– displacement components
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 11
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
•	 Assumptions are based on physical intuition, experimental
evidence, prior experience (sheer need?)
• Assumptions may be due to…
– boundary conditions not properly met
– etc.
(Note: plane stress is generally an assumption)
⇒ There is an important concept that allows us to make such assumptions:
St. Venant’s Principle
“If the loading distribution on the small section of the surface of an
elastic body is replaced by another loading which has the same
resultant force and moment as the original loading, then no
appreciable changes will occur in the stresses in the body except in
the region near the surface where the loading is altered”.
What does this really say?
⇒“Far” from the specifics of load introduction / boundary
conditions, the specifics of such are unimportant
•	 This is a ramification of the issue of “scale” as discussed
earlier in this course and in Unified.
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 12
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
• (“Rule of Thumb”) Generally, the area where “specifics”
are important extends into the body for a distance equal
to about the greatest linear dimension of the portion of
the surface on which the loading / B.C. occurs.
•	 This allows us to get solutions for most parts of a
structure via such a method.
But failure often originates/occurs in a region of load
introduction/boundary condition
(example: where do nailed/screwed boards
break?)
Examples (for stress functions)
Example 1 (assume ∆T = 0, V = 0 [no body forces])
Pick φ = C1 y2
this satisfies ∇4
φ = 0
C1 is a constant…will be determined by satisfying the
B.C.’s
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 13
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
Using the definitions:
∂2
φ
σxx = 2
= 2C1
∂y
∂2
φ
σ = = 0
yy
∂x2
σ = 0
xy
gives the state of stress
What problem does this solve???
Uniaxial loading
Figure 8.1 Representation of Uniaxial Plane Stress Loading
applied stress (uniform
stress on end)
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 14
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
Check the B.C.’s:
@ x = l, 0
σ
σxx = σo = 2C1 ⇒ C1 = o
2
σ = 0
xy
@ y = ±
w
2
σ = 0
yy
σ = 0
xy
Thus: φ =	
σo
y2
2
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 15
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
•	 The strains can then be evaluated using the stress-strain
equations (compliance form).
•	 The displacements can then be determined by using the
strain-displacement relations and integrating and
applying the displacement B.C.’s.
In this case, you get:
σo
u = x
E
v = −
ν
σo y
E
(Note: elastic constants now come in)
--> Let’s look at the “real” case and see where/why we have to apply St.
Venant’s Principle and the “Semi - Inverse Method”.
Consider a test coupon in mechanical grips (end of specimen is fixed):
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 16
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
Figure 8.2 Representation of uniaxial test specimen and resultant
stress state
x
y
These grips allow no displacement in the y-direction
--> v = 0 both @ x = 0, l
The solution gives:
−νσ
v = y ≠ 0 in general @ x = 0, l
E
But, “far” from the effects of load introduction, the solution φ holds.
Near the grips, biaxial stresses arise. Often failure occurs here.
(Note: not in a pure uniaxial field. This is a common problem with test
specimens.)
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 17
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
Example 2

Let’s now get a bit more involved and consider the…

Stress Distribution Around a Hole
Figure 8.3 Configuration of uniaxially loaded plate with a hole
Large (“infinite”) plate subjected to uniform far - field tension
Since the “local specific” of interest is a circle, it makes sense to use
polar coordinates.
By using the transformations to polar coordinates of Unit #7, we find:
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 18
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
1 ∂φ 1 ∂2
φ
σrr =
r ∂r
+
r2
∂θ2
+ V
∂2
φ
+ V
σθθ =
∂r2
1 ∂2
φ 1 ∂φ
+
r
σrθ = −
r ∂ ∂θ r2
∂θ
These are, again, defined such that equilibrium equations are
automatically satisfied.
where: fr = −
∂V
fθ = −
1 ∂V
∂r r ∂θ
∂fθ
+
fθ 1 ∂fr
and V exists if: =
∂r r r ∂θ
The governing equation is again:
∇4
φ = −Eα∇2
(∆T) − (1 − ν) ∇2 V
for plane stress, isotropic
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 19
 
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
but the Laplace operator in polar coordinates is:
∇2
=
∂2
+
1 ∂
+
1 ∂2
∂r2
r ∂r r2
∂θ2
Let’s go through the steps…
Step 1: Assume a φ(r, θ)
“We know” the correct function is:
φ = [A0 + B0 lnr + C0r2
+ D0r2
lnr]
+ 
A2r2
+
B
2
2
+ C r4
+ D2

 cos2θ
2
r
Does this satisfy equilibrium? It must.
One can show it satisfies ∇4
φ
However, it can also be shown that non-zero values of D0 result in
mulitvalued displacements in the y-direction (v), so we must
get D0 = 0
[don’t worry about this, just “accept” it…I do!]
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 20
 
 
 
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
Step 2: Determine stresses
Performing the derivatives from the φ-σ relations in polar coordinates
results in:
σrr =
B
2
0
+ 2C0 + 
−2A2 −
6B
4
2
−
4D2  cos2θ
r r r2 
σθθ = −
B
2
0
+ 2C0 + 
2A2 +
6B
4
2
+ 12C2r2 
 cos2θ
r r
2
in
σrθ = 
2A2 −
6B
4
2
+ 6C2r2
−
2D2 
 s 2θ
r r
Note that we have a term involving r2. As r gets larger, the stresses
would become infinite. This is not possible. Thus, the coefficient C 2
must be zero:
C2 = 0
So we have five constants remaining:
A2, B0, B2, C0, D2
we find these by…
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 21
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
Step 3: Satisfy the boundary conditions
What are the boundary conditions here?
•	 at the edge of the hole there are no stresses (stress-free
edge)
⇒ @ r = a: σrr = 0, σθr = 0
• at the y-edge, there are no stresses
⇒ @ y = ± ∞: σyy = 0, σyx = 0
•	 at the x-edges, the stress is equal to the applied stress
and there is no strain
⇒ @ x = ± ∞: σxx = σ0 , σxy = 0
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 22
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
Since we are dealing with polar coordinates, we need to change the
last two sets of B. C.’s to polar coordinates. We use:
σ̃αρ = l2̃σ
lβ̃γ
lσγ
and look at r = ∞
σ̃xx = σrr = cos2
θ σo
σ̃yy = σθθ = sin2
θ σo
σ̃xy = σrθ = − sinθcosθ σo
Figure 8.4 Representation of local rotation of stresses from polar to
Cartesian system
We use the double angle trigonometric identities to put this in a more
convenient form:
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 23
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
cos2
θ =�
1
(1 + cos2θ)
2
1
sinθ cosθ = sin2θ
2
sin2
θ =�
1
(1 − cos2θ)
2
Thus at r = ∞
σ σo
σ = o
+ cos2θ
rr
2 2
σ
σrθ = − o
sin2θ
2
Why don’t we include σθθ?
At the boundary in polar coordinates, this stress does not
act on the edge/boundary.
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 24
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
Figure 8.5 Stress condition at boundary of hole
So we (summarizing) appear to have 4 B. C.’s:
σ σ
σrr = o
+ o
cos2θ @ r = ∞
2 2
σ
σrθ = − o
sin2θ @ r = ∞
2
σrr = 0 @ r = a
σrθ = 0 @ r = a
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 25
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
And we have 5 constants to determine.
What happened?
The condition of σrr at r = ∞ is really two B. C.’s
− a constant part

− a part multiplying cos 2θ

Going through (and skipping) the math, we end up with:
σ
σ
θ
σ
σ
θ
σ
σ
θθ
θ
rr
o
2
2
o
2
2
4
4
o
2
2
o
4
4
o
2
2
1
a
r 2
1 4
a
r
3
a
r
2
1
a
r 2
1 3
a
r
2
1 2
a
r
= −





 + − +






=





 − +






= − +
cos
cos
2
2
r 2
2
4
4
3
a
r
in
−





 s 2θ
σ
σ
+
for: …
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 26
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
Figure 8.6 Polar coordinate configuration for uniaxially loaded plate
with center hole
So we have the solution to find the stress field around a hole. Let’s
consider one important point. Where’s the largest stress?
At the edge of the hole. Think of “flow” around the hole:
Figure 8.7 Representation of stress “flow” around a hole
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 27
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
@ θ = 90°, r = a
σ  a2
 σ  a4

o
σθθ = σxx =
2
o

1 +
a2 

−
2


1 + 3
a4

(−1)
= 3 σo
Define the:
Stress Concentration Factor (SCF) = local stress
far - field stress
SCF = 3 at hole in isotropic plate
The SCF is a more general concept. Generally the “sharper” the
discontinuity, the higher the SCF.
The SCF will also depend on the material. For orthotropic materials, it
depends on Ex and Ey getting higher as Ex/Ey increases. In a uni-directional
composite, can have SCF = 7.
Can do stress functions for orthotropic materials, but need to go to
complex variable mapping
--> (See Lekhnitskii as noted earlier)
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 28
MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002
Example 3 -- Beam in Bending
(we’ll save for a problem set or a recitation)
There are many other cases (use earlier references)
− circular disks
− rotary disks
.
.
“classic” cases
But…what’s really the point? Are these still used?
Yes!

This is a very powerful technique which is especially well-suited for
preliminary design and exploratory development
− parametric study
− know assumptions and resulting limitations and then
interpret results accordingly
− linear solutions --> can use principle of superposition
− can find many solutions in books
(See attached page)
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 29
MIT - 16.20
1.
2.
3.
Fall, 2002
Roark, Raymond J., “Roark’s Formulas for
Stresses and Strain, 6th Ed.,” New York,
McGraw-Hill, 1989.
Peterson, Rudolph E., “Stress Concentration
Factors: Charts and Relations Useful in
Making Strength Calculations for Machine
Parts and Structural Elements,” New York,
Wiley, 1974.
Pilkey, Walter D., “Formulas for Stress, Strain,
and Structural Matrices,” New York, John
Wiley, 1994.
Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 30

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unit8.pdf

  • 1. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 Unit 8 Solution Procedures Readings: R Ch. 4 T & G 17, Ch. 3 (18-26) Ch. 4 (27-46) Ch. 6 (54-73) Paul A. Lagace, Ph.D. Professor of Aeronautics & Astronautics and Engineering Systems Paul A. Lagace © 2001
  • 2. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 Summarizing what we’ve looked at in elasticity, we have: 15 equations in 15 unknowns - 3 equilibrium - 6 strains - 6 strain-displacement - 3 displacements - 6 stress-strain - 6 stresses These must be solved for a generic body under some generic loading subject to the prescribed boundary conditions (B.C.’s) There are two types of boundary conditions: 1. Normal (stress prescribed) 2. Geometric (displacement prescribed) --> you must have one or the other To solve this system of equations subject to such constraints over the continuum of a generic body is, in general, quite a challenge. There are basically two solution procedures: 1. Exact -- satisfy all the equations and the B.C.’s 2. Numerical -- come as “close as possible” (energy methods, etc.) Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 2
  • 3. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 Let’s consider “exact” techniques. A common, and classic, one is: Stress Functions • Relate six stresses to (fewer) functions defined in such a manner that they identically satisfy the equilibrium conditon • Can be done for 3-D case • Can be done for anisotropic (most often orthotropic) case --> See: Lekhnitskii, Anisotropic Plates, Gordan & Breach, 1968. --> Let’s consider • plane stress • (eventually) isotropic 8 equations in 8 unknowns - 2 equilibrium - 3 strains - 3 strain-displacement - 2 displacements - 3 stress-strain - 3 stresses Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 3
  • 4. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 Define the “Airy” Stress Function = φ(x, y) English a scalar mathematician ∂2 φ σxx = 2 + V (8 -1) ∂y ∂2 φ σyy = ∂x2 + V (8 - 2) 2 φ σxy = − ∂ (8 - 3) x y ∂ ∂ where: V = potential function for body forces fx and fy fx = − ∂V fy = − ∂V ∂x ∂y V exists if ∇ x f = 0 (curl) that is: ∂fx = ∂fy ∂y ∂x Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 4
  • 5. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 Recall that curl f = 0 ⇒ “conservative” field - gravity forces - spring forces - etc. What does that compare to in fluids? Irrotational flow Look at how φ has been defined and what happens if we place these equations (8-1 - 8-3) into the plane stress equilibrium equations: ∂σxx + ∂σxy + fx = 0 (E1) ∂x ∂y ∂σ ∂σ xy yy ∂x + ∂y + fy = 0 (E2) we then get: Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 5
  • 6.  ∂ ∂ ∂ ∂ MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 2 ∂  ∂2 φ E1 ( ) :  2 +V   + ∂   − ∂ φ   − ∂V = 0 ? x ∂x  ∂y  ∂y  ∂ ∂y ∂x ∂3 φ + ∂V − ∂3 φ − ∂ V = 0 (yes) ⇒ ∂ ∂ x y x y2 ∂x ∂ ∂ 2 ∂x 2 ∂   − ∂ φ  ∂  ∂2 φ (E2) : ∂x  ∂ ∂y   + ∂y   ∂x2 + V    − ∂V = 0 ? x ∂y ∂3 φ + ∂3 φ + ∂ V − ∂ V= 0 (yes) ⇒ 2 2 x y x y ∂y ∂y ⇒Equilibrium automatically satisfied using Airy stress function! Does that mean that any function we pick for φ (x, y) will be valid? No, it will satisfy equilibrium, but we still have the strain-displacement and stress-strain equations. If we use these, we can get to the governing equation: Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 6
  • 7. (E MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 Step 1: Introduce φ into the stress-strain equations (compliance form): 1 E3 εxx = E (σxx − νσyy ) ( ) 1 εyy = (−νσxx + σyy ) (E4) E εxy = 2 (1 E + ν) σxy (E5) So: εxx = 1  ∂2 φ − ν ∂2 φ + (1 − ν) V (E3′) E   ∂y2 ∂x2   E εyy = 1  ∂2 φ − ν ∂2 φ + (1 − ν) V (E4′) E   ∂x2 ∂y2   E εxy = − 2 (1 + ν) ∂2 φ (E5′) x y E ∂ ∂ Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 7
  • 8. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 Step 2: Use these in the plane stress compatibility equation: ∂2 εxx ∂2 εyy ∂2 εxy + = x y ∂y2 ∂x2 ∂ ∂ (E6) ⇒ we get quite a mess! After some rearranging and manipulation, this results in: V V ∂ ∂ + ∂ ∂ ∂ + ∂ ∂ = − ∂ ( ) ∂ + ∂ ( ) ∂       − ( ) ∂ ∂ + ∂ ∂       4 4 4 2 2 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 φ φ α x y y E T x T y y 2 ∆ − 2 φ ν x x ∆ (*) temperature term we haven’t yet considered α = coefficient of thermal expansion ∆T = temperature differential This is the basic equation for isotropic plane stress in Stress Function form Recall: φ is a scalar Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 8
  • 9. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 If we recall a little mathematics, the Laplace Operator in 2-D is: ∇2 ∂2 ∂2 = + ∂x2 ∂y2 ∂4 ∂4 ∂4 ⇒ ∇2 ∇2 = ∇4 = ∂x4 + 2 2 2 + ∂y4 x ∂ ∂y This is the biharmonic operator (also used in fluids) So the (*) equation can be written: ∇4φ = −Eα∇2 (∆T) − (1 − ν) ∇2 V (*) Finally, in the absence of temperature effects and body forces this becomes: ∇4 φ = 0 homogeneous form What happened to E, ν?? Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 9
  • 10. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 ⇒ this function, and accompanying governing equation, could be defined in any curvilinear system (we’ll see one such example later) and in plane strain as well. But…what’s this all useful for??? This may all seem like “magic”. Why were the σ’s assumed as they were? This is not a direct solution to a posed problem, per se, but is known as… The Inverse Method In general, for cases of plane stress without body force or temp (∇4 φ = 0): 1. A stress function φ (x, y) is assumed that satisfies the biharmonic equation 2. The stresses are determined from the stress function as defined in equations (8-1) - (8-3) 3. Satisfy the boundary conditions (of applied tractions) 4. Find the (structural) problem that this satisfies Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 10
  • 11. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 • Mathematicians actually did this and created many solutions. So there are many stress functions that have been found to solve specific structural problems (see, for example, Rivello, pp, 72-73 also T & G) • These are linear solutions and thus the “Principle of Superposition” applies such that these can be combined to solve any particular problem • The inverse method yields an exact solution. In real life, an exact solution generally cannot be obtained. We often “notch it down one” and resort to the… The Semi-Inverse Method This is basically the same as the Inverse Method except that the solution is not exact in that we… • Make simplifying assumptions to get solvable equations. These can be with regard to: – stress components – displacement components Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 11
  • 12. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 • Assumptions are based on physical intuition, experimental evidence, prior experience (sheer need?) • Assumptions may be due to… – boundary conditions not properly met – etc. (Note: plane stress is generally an assumption) ⇒ There is an important concept that allows us to make such assumptions: St. Venant’s Principle “If the loading distribution on the small section of the surface of an elastic body is replaced by another loading which has the same resultant force and moment as the original loading, then no appreciable changes will occur in the stresses in the body except in the region near the surface where the loading is altered”. What does this really say? ⇒“Far” from the specifics of load introduction / boundary conditions, the specifics of such are unimportant • This is a ramification of the issue of “scale” as discussed earlier in this course and in Unified. Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 12
  • 13. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 • (“Rule of Thumb”) Generally, the area where “specifics” are important extends into the body for a distance equal to about the greatest linear dimension of the portion of the surface on which the loading / B.C. occurs. • This allows us to get solutions for most parts of a structure via such a method. But failure often originates/occurs in a region of load introduction/boundary condition (example: where do nailed/screwed boards break?) Examples (for stress functions) Example 1 (assume ∆T = 0, V = 0 [no body forces]) Pick φ = C1 y2 this satisfies ∇4 φ = 0 C1 is a constant…will be determined by satisfying the B.C.’s Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 13
  • 14. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 Using the definitions: ∂2 φ σxx = 2 = 2C1 ∂y ∂2 φ σ = = 0 yy ∂x2 σ = 0 xy gives the state of stress What problem does this solve??? Uniaxial loading Figure 8.1 Representation of Uniaxial Plane Stress Loading applied stress (uniform stress on end) Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 14
  • 15. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 Check the B.C.’s: @ x = l, 0 σ σxx = σo = 2C1 ⇒ C1 = o 2 σ = 0 xy @ y = ± w 2 σ = 0 yy σ = 0 xy Thus: φ = σo y2 2 Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 15
  • 16. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 • The strains can then be evaluated using the stress-strain equations (compliance form). • The displacements can then be determined by using the strain-displacement relations and integrating and applying the displacement B.C.’s. In this case, you get: σo u = x E v = − ν σo y E (Note: elastic constants now come in) --> Let’s look at the “real” case and see where/why we have to apply St. Venant’s Principle and the “Semi - Inverse Method”. Consider a test coupon in mechanical grips (end of specimen is fixed): Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 16
  • 17. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 Figure 8.2 Representation of uniaxial test specimen and resultant stress state x y These grips allow no displacement in the y-direction --> v = 0 both @ x = 0, l The solution gives: −νσ v = y ≠ 0 in general @ x = 0, l E But, “far” from the effects of load introduction, the solution φ holds. Near the grips, biaxial stresses arise. Often failure occurs here. (Note: not in a pure uniaxial field. This is a common problem with test specimens.) Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 17
  • 18. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 Example 2 Let’s now get a bit more involved and consider the… Stress Distribution Around a Hole Figure 8.3 Configuration of uniaxially loaded plate with a hole Large (“infinite”) plate subjected to uniform far - field tension Since the “local specific” of interest is a circle, it makes sense to use polar coordinates. By using the transformations to polar coordinates of Unit #7, we find: Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 18
  • 19. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 1 ∂φ 1 ∂2 φ σrr = r ∂r + r2 ∂θ2 + V ∂2 φ + V σθθ = ∂r2 1 ∂2 φ 1 ∂φ + r σrθ = − r ∂ ∂θ r2 ∂θ These are, again, defined such that equilibrium equations are automatically satisfied. where: fr = − ∂V fθ = − 1 ∂V ∂r r ∂θ ∂fθ + fθ 1 ∂fr and V exists if: = ∂r r r ∂θ The governing equation is again: ∇4 φ = −Eα∇2 (∆T) − (1 − ν) ∇2 V for plane stress, isotropic Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 19
  • 20.   MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 but the Laplace operator in polar coordinates is: ∇2 = ∂2 + 1 ∂ + 1 ∂2 ∂r2 r ∂r r2 ∂θ2 Let’s go through the steps… Step 1: Assume a φ(r, θ) “We know” the correct function is: φ = [A0 + B0 lnr + C0r2 + D0r2 lnr] +  A2r2 + B 2 2 + C r4 + D2   cos2θ 2 r Does this satisfy equilibrium? It must. One can show it satisfies ∇4 φ However, it can also be shown that non-zero values of D0 result in mulitvalued displacements in the y-direction (v), so we must get D0 = 0 [don’t worry about this, just “accept” it…I do!] Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 20
  • 21.       MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 Step 2: Determine stresses Performing the derivatives from the φ-σ relations in polar coordinates results in: σrr = B 2 0 + 2C0 +  −2A2 − 6B 4 2 − 4D2  cos2θ r r r2  σθθ = − B 2 0 + 2C0 +  2A2 + 6B 4 2 + 12C2r2   cos2θ r r 2 in σrθ =  2A2 − 6B 4 2 + 6C2r2 − 2D2   s 2θ r r Note that we have a term involving r2. As r gets larger, the stresses would become infinite. This is not possible. Thus, the coefficient C 2 must be zero: C2 = 0 So we have five constants remaining: A2, B0, B2, C0, D2 we find these by… Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 21
  • 22. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 Step 3: Satisfy the boundary conditions What are the boundary conditions here? • at the edge of the hole there are no stresses (stress-free edge) ⇒ @ r = a: σrr = 0, σθr = 0 • at the y-edge, there are no stresses ⇒ @ y = ± ∞: σyy = 0, σyx = 0 • at the x-edges, the stress is equal to the applied stress and there is no strain ⇒ @ x = ± ∞: σxx = σ0 , σxy = 0 Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 22
  • 23. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 Since we are dealing with polar coordinates, we need to change the last two sets of B. C.’s to polar coordinates. We use: σ̃αρ = l2̃σ lβ̃γ lσγ and look at r = ∞ σ̃xx = σrr = cos2 θ σo σ̃yy = σθθ = sin2 θ σo σ̃xy = σrθ = − sinθcosθ σo Figure 8.4 Representation of local rotation of stresses from polar to Cartesian system We use the double angle trigonometric identities to put this in a more convenient form: Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 23
  • 24. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 cos2 θ =� 1 (1 + cos2θ) 2 1 sinθ cosθ = sin2θ 2 sin2 θ =� 1 (1 − cos2θ) 2 Thus at r = ∞ σ σo σ = o + cos2θ rr 2 2 σ σrθ = − o sin2θ 2 Why don’t we include σθθ? At the boundary in polar coordinates, this stress does not act on the edge/boundary. Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 24
  • 25. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 Figure 8.5 Stress condition at boundary of hole So we (summarizing) appear to have 4 B. C.’s: σ σ σrr = o + o cos2θ @ r = ∞ 2 2 σ σrθ = − o sin2θ @ r = ∞ 2 σrr = 0 @ r = a σrθ = 0 @ r = a Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 25
  • 26. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 And we have 5 constants to determine. What happened? The condition of σrr at r = ∞ is really two B. C.’s − a constant part − a part multiplying cos 2θ Going through (and skipping) the math, we end up with: σ σ θ σ σ θ σ σ θθ θ rr o 2 2 o 2 2 4 4 o 2 2 o 4 4 o 2 2 1 a r 2 1 4 a r 3 a r 2 1 a r 2 1 3 a r 2 1 2 a r = −       + − +       =       − +       = − + cos cos 2 2 r 2 2 4 4 3 a r in −       s 2θ σ σ + for: … Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 26
  • 27. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 Figure 8.6 Polar coordinate configuration for uniaxially loaded plate with center hole So we have the solution to find the stress field around a hole. Let’s consider one important point. Where’s the largest stress? At the edge of the hole. Think of “flow” around the hole: Figure 8.7 Representation of stress “flow” around a hole Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 27
  • 28. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 @ θ = 90°, r = a σ  a2  σ  a4  o σθθ = σxx = 2 o  1 + a2   − 2   1 + 3 a4  (−1) = 3 σo Define the: Stress Concentration Factor (SCF) = local stress far - field stress SCF = 3 at hole in isotropic plate The SCF is a more general concept. Generally the “sharper” the discontinuity, the higher the SCF. The SCF will also depend on the material. For orthotropic materials, it depends on Ex and Ey getting higher as Ex/Ey increases. In a uni-directional composite, can have SCF = 7. Can do stress functions for orthotropic materials, but need to go to complex variable mapping --> (See Lekhnitskii as noted earlier) Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 28
  • 29. MIT - 16.20 Fall, 2002 Example 3 -- Beam in Bending (we’ll save for a problem set or a recitation) There are many other cases (use earlier references) − circular disks − rotary disks . . “classic” cases But…what’s really the point? Are these still used? Yes! This is a very powerful technique which is especially well-suited for preliminary design and exploratory development − parametric study − know assumptions and resulting limitations and then interpret results accordingly − linear solutions --> can use principle of superposition − can find many solutions in books (See attached page) Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 29
  • 30. MIT - 16.20 1. 2. 3. Fall, 2002 Roark, Raymond J., “Roark’s Formulas for Stresses and Strain, 6th Ed.,” New York, McGraw-Hill, 1989. Peterson, Rudolph E., “Stress Concentration Factors: Charts and Relations Useful in Making Strength Calculations for Machine Parts and Structural Elements,” New York, Wiley, 1974. Pilkey, Walter D., “Formulas for Stress, Strain, and Structural Matrices,” New York, John Wiley, 1994. Paul A. Lagace © 2001 Unit 8 - p. 30