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The Partisan Divide and American Elections: Media Watchdog Group Lisa Marquez Jessica  Naberhaus Mandi Millar
OBJECTIVES <ul><li>*History of news media’s influence on American politics </li></ul><ul><li>*How does the media enable an...
An overview of Mass Media and the electoral process <ul><li>National television networks reach 99% of all Americans. </li>...
Election Coverage and the Partisan Divide <ul><li>A primary cause for polarization: party-related info about candidates at...
Biased coverage and the partisan divide <ul><li>News media’s coverage of elections have continued and oftentimes increased...
Candidate and Issue-sponsored Paid Advertising <ul><li>-In addition to the news media, candidates are entitled to buy medi...
Election Spending <ul><li>Citizens United Vs. The Federal Election Commission </li></ul><ul><ul><li>On January 21, 2010, t...
<ul><li>-Pew Research Center for People and the Press </li></ul>
Current Responses to Media Bias <ul><li>Many websites that monitor the media: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>www.newswatch.org  and...
They’ve got it covered… <ul><li>National Scope </li></ul><ul><li>Campaign contributions, money tracking </li></ul><ul><li>...
Challenges <ul><li>Obvious and Perceived Media Bias  </li></ul>From: Pewresearch.org
Challenges <ul><li>Cognitive Dissonance </li></ul>
Challenges <ul><li>Hostile Media Phenomenon- Audiences perceive neutral media to be biased against their own position </li...
<ul><li>Debates presented on TV program and encouraged interactively on website    diverse views presented. </li></ul><ul...
Our Proposal  <ul><li>Partnership with other  nonpartisan, nonprofit watchdogs, as well as social media sites </li></ul><u...
-Pew Research Center for People and the Press
Local TV news media is favored by Republicans and Democrats -Pew Research Center for People and the Press
Campaigning <ul><li>THEN  </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on basic demographic categories like race, class, and gender </li></ul>N...
Campaigning NOW Political characters are fleeting, and there are permanent campaigns on lasting issue positions. THEN Desi...
Detecting Bias <ul><li>Sponsorship </li></ul><ul><li>Political Position </li></ul><ul><li>Credibility </li></ul><ul><li>Pr...
Questions?  Comments?  Compliments? For more information or to access our presentation, please visit: http://www.slideshar...
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The Partisan Divide and American Elections

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The Partisan Divide and American Elections:
Media Watchdog Group

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The Partisan Divide and American Elections

  1. 1. The Partisan Divide and American Elections: Media Watchdog Group Lisa Marquez Jessica Naberhaus Mandi Millar
  2. 2. OBJECTIVES <ul><li>*History of news media’s influence on American politics </li></ul><ul><li>*How does the media enable and encourage the partisan divide? </li></ul><ul><li>*Solutions and suggestions to overcoming media bias and the partisan divide </li></ul><ul><li>*Discussion </li></ul>
  3. 3. An overview of Mass Media and the electoral process <ul><li>National television networks reach 99% of all Americans. </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. citizens have experienced a proliferation in # and type of media. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1,600 daily newspapers </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>7,000 weekly newspapers </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>11,000 magazines and journals </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>12,500 radio stations </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1,500 television station </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Broadcast media devotes most of time to covering competition between candidates rather than providing explanation of issues and candidate’s stances on them. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Election Coverage and the Partisan Divide <ul><li>A primary cause for polarization: party-related info about candidates at the expense of party-independent information. </li></ul><ul><li>Competition in political campaign over which candidate will set the agenda? How will the campaign be fought: On issues the candidate chooses, or issues their opponent brings up? </li></ul>
  5. 5. Biased coverage and the partisan divide <ul><li>News media’s coverage of elections have continued and oftentimes increased the partisan divide. What is the roll of bias? </li></ul><ul><li>4 types of bias to be aware of </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Partisan bias: A cause is explicitly and deliberately promoted. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Propaganda bias: A story is reported with the intention of making the case for a particular party, policy, or point-of-view without explicitly stating this. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unwitting bias: Hard choices have to be made about what to cover and what to exclude in news reporting. Reflects decisions about importance of story. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ideological bias: Bias is hidden and unintended. The attention is upon ‘norms’ against which the news is created. </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Candidate and Issue-sponsored Paid Advertising <ul><li>-In addition to the news media, candidates are entitled to buy media advertising </li></ul><ul><li>-Content is designed by candidates and disseminates a message that candidates draft and control </li></ul><ul><li>-Use of candidate-centered paid advertising has become a distinct feature of the American political campaign process </li></ul><ul><li>-Neither federal nor state law limits the number or length of political advertisements a candidate or party may distribute. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Election Spending <ul><li>Citizens United Vs. The Federal Election Commission </li></ul><ul><ul><li>On January 21, 2010, the Supreme Court chose to eliminate limits on corporate and union spending on political campaigns. </li></ul></ul>The last two elections saw record spending by candidates in both the House and the Senate.
  8. 8. <ul><li>-Pew Research Center for People and the Press </li></ul>
  9. 9. Current Responses to Media Bias <ul><li>Many websites that monitor the media: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>www.newswatch.org and www.bigeye.com </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Related websites that list links for quick access to “educational and interesting” websites </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.Politicalwatchdog.com </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Informs its members via email alert about new laws that legislators are talking about and how to express their opinion to their legislator. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.Factcheck.org </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Monitors the factual accuracy of </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>what is said by political leaders </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.opensecrets.org </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Monitors campaign contributions and lobbying, tracks government money </li></ul></ul></ul>
  10. 10. They’ve got it covered… <ul><li>National Scope </li></ul><ul><li>Campaign contributions, money tracking </li></ul><ul><li>Lobbying, Politicians and Legislation </li></ul><ul><li>Internet driven </li></ul><ul><li>It needs to be covered…. </li></ul><ul><li>Local Politics </li></ul><ul><li>Elections </li></ul><ul><li>Via Different Media means </li></ul>
  11. 11. Challenges <ul><li>Obvious and Perceived Media Bias </li></ul>From: Pewresearch.org
  12. 12. Challenges <ul><li>Cognitive Dissonance </li></ul>
  13. 13. Challenges <ul><li>Hostile Media Phenomenon- Audiences perceive neutral media to be biased against their own position </li></ul>
  14. 14. <ul><li>Debates presented on TV program and encouraged interactively on website  diverse views presented. </li></ul><ul><li>Policies, institutions and local issues analyzed </li></ul><ul><li>Bilingual </li></ul>Our Proposal
  15. 15. Our Proposal <ul><li>Partnership with other nonpartisan, nonprofit watchdogs, as well as social media sites </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple sites for implementation of program, addressing issues of local importance (across state, across country?) </li></ul><ul><li>Held once a week, all year long, addressing the previous week’s media  indirectly provides incentives to media for factual reporting </li></ul>
  16. 16. -Pew Research Center for People and the Press
  17. 17. Local TV news media is favored by Republicans and Democrats -Pew Research Center for People and the Press
  18. 18. Campaigning <ul><li>THEN </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on basic demographic categories like race, class, and gender </li></ul>NOW Much more subtle and based on demographics, psychographics, and opinion
  19. 19. Campaigning NOW Political characters are fleeting, and there are permanent campaigns on lasting issue positions. THEN Desirable qualities of candidates were marketed because strong political character would bring stability in a world of fleeting political issues.
  20. 20. Detecting Bias <ul><li>Sponsorship </li></ul><ul><li>Political Position </li></ul><ul><li>Credibility </li></ul><ul><li>Presentation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One-sided? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ignore any issues? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Present opposing view? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Negative perspective about anything? </li></ul></ul>
  21. 21. Questions? Comments? Compliments? For more information or to access our presentation, please visit: http://www.slideshare.net/PSCIProject/the-partisan-divide-and-american-elections

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