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Lake County Snapshot

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PCRD Data Snapshot

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Lake County Snapshot

  1. 1. Data SnapShot Series 1.0 October 2014 DATA SNAPSHOT Lake County
  2. 2. Table of contents Introduction 01 Demography 02 Economy 03 Labor Market 04
  3. 3. Purpose About Lake County 01 introduction
  4. 4. 4 Purpose This document provides information and data about Lake County that can be used to guide local decision- making activities. The Data SnapShot showcases a variety of demographic, economic and labor market information that local leaders, community organizations and others can use to gain a better perspective on current conditions and opportunities in their county. To strengthen the value and usability of the information, we showcase the data using a variety of visual tools, such as charts, graphs and tables. In addition, we offer key points about the data as a way of assisting the user with the interpretation of the information presented. Finally, short takeaway messages are offered at the end of each section in order to highlight some of the more salient findings. Introduction section 01
  5. 5. 5 About Lake County Introduction section 01 County Background Established 1837 County Seat Crown Point Area 627 sq. mi. Neighboring Counties Jasper, IN Newton, IN Porter, IN Cook, IL Kankakee, IL Will, IL
  6. 6. Population change Population pyramids Race Ethnicity Educational attainment Takeaways 02 demograph y
  7. 7. 7 Population change Components of Population Change, 2000- 2012 Total Change 5,572 Natural Increase 26,367 International Migration 4,436 Domestic Migration -22,404 The total population is projected to increase by 3 percent between 2012 and 2020. Demography Sources: STATSIndiana, U.S. Census Bureau – 2000 Decennial Census, 2010 Decennial Census, 2012 Estimates, Estimates of the Components of Resident Population Change section 02 The total population increased by 2 percent between 2000 and 2012. The major contributor to that expansion was natural increase (births minus deaths over that span of time) with a net growth of nearly 26,000 persons. Data on domestic migration (the difference between the number of people moving out of the county versus moving in) shows that out-migration outpaced in- migration by nearly 22,000 people. On the other hand, international migration had a net increase of over 4,400, indicating that the county experienced an influx of new people from outside the U.S. 484,564 496,005 493,618 507,724 2020201220102000 Total population projections
  8. 8. 8 6.6% 7.0% 6.2% 6.5% 6.7% 7.6% 5.3% 3.2% 2.5% 6.9% 7.3% 6.1% 6.1% 6.3% 7.1% 4.8% 2.4% 1.4% 9 6 3 0 3 6 9 0-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70-79 80+ Percent of the PopulationAgeCohort Population pyramids Population pyramids are visual representations of the age distribution of the population by gender. While the male to female ratio of the population did not change dramatically between 2000 and 2012, the distribution of people across the various age categories did change over the two periods of time. Demography Source: U.S. Census Bureau – 2000 Decennial Census and 2012 Annual Population Estimates section 02 The percent of people under 50 years old has decreased for both males and females over the 2000 to 2012 period.Also, the number of 50 and over now stands at nearly 169,000 people (about 34 percent of the population, up from 28 percent in 2000). Male Female 2012 7.2% 7.3% 6.5% 7.2% 8.0% 5.8% 4.1% 3.6% 2.1% 7.5% 7.7% 6.2% 6.7% 7.5% 5.4% 3.5% 2.6% 1.1% 9 6 3 0 3 6 9 00-09 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70-79 80+ Percent of the Population AgeCohort 2000 Male Female
  9. 9. 9 Race The number of non-White residents in Lake County increased by 5 percentage points between 2000 and 2012. While every race other thanWhite experienced a numerical increase, the population of Asian, Other and Mixed Descent races gained the most people, expanding from 33 percent to 38 percent of the total population between 2000 and 2012. Demography Race Data Source: U.S. Census Bureau – 2000 Decennial Census and 2012 ACS section 02 White 67% Oth… 2000 Black Asian Native Other Mixed White 62% Other 38% 2012 Black Asian Native Other Mixed
  10. 10. 10 Ethnicity Hispanics are individuals of any race whose ancestry is from Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Spain, the Dominican Republic or any other Spanish-speaking Central or South American country. There were 59,128 residing in Lake County in 2000.This figure expanded to 82,652 by 2012, a 39.7 percent increase. As a result, Hispanics now make up 17 percent of the overall population (versus 12 percent in 2000). Demography Source: U.S. Census Bureau – 2000 Decennial Census and 2012 ACS section 02 17% 12% Hispanics - 2000 Hispanics - 2012
  11. 11. 11 Educational attainment Demography Source: U.S. Census Bureau – 2000 Decennial Census and 2012 ACS section 02 No High School 14% High School 36% Some College 32% College 18% 2012 No High School 20% High School 37% Some College 28% College 15% 2000Educational attainment for adults 18 years of age and older in Lake County is increasing. The proportion of adults (18 years of age and older) with a high school education or more improved from 80 percent in 2000 to 86 percent by 2012. The percentage with less than a high school education fell by 6 percent between 2000 and 2012 (from 20 percent to 14 percent). On the other hand, those with some college education grew from 28 percent to 32 percent. The number of adults with a bachelor’s degree or more was18 percent in 2012, a slight increase compared to 2000.
  12. 12. 12 Takeaways The population of Lake County is expected to grow modestly over the next few years, and if past trends hold, that increase will be largely due to natural increase (more births than deaths). While Lake County’s population has been growing over the 2000 to 2012 period, it has also been aging. In addition, its population has declined by nearly 22,000 people due to domestic out-migration, suggesting that young individuals and those of prime working age (20-39 years of age) are moving out of the county at a faster pace than they are moving in. The educational level of the population has increased and the county has become more diverse by race and ethnicity since 2000. In order to achieve a balanced ratio of working-age individuals and dependents (minors and elderly), Lake County should explore what mix of services and amenities will retain and attract educated young adults. Demography section 02
  13. 13. Establishments Industries Occupations Income and poverty Takeaways 03 economy
  14. 14. 14 Establishments Components of Change for Establishments Total Change (2000-11) 16,143 Natural Change (births minus deaths) 15,755 Net Migration 388 The number of establishments in Lake County doubled between 2000 and 2011. The rapid growth of establishments was largely due to natural change.That is, 35,600 establishments were launched in the county between 2000 and 2011, while 19,800 closed, resulting in a gain of 15,755 establishments. Economy Source: National Establishment Time Series (NETS) – 2011 Database section 03 An establishment is a physical business location. Branches, standalones and headquarters are all considered types of establishments. Definition of Company Stages 0 1 2 3 4 Self- employed 2-9 employees 10-99 employees 100-499 employees 500+ employees
  15. 15. 15 Number of establishments by stage/employment category Economy Source: National Establishment Time Series (NETS) – 2011 Database section 03 2000 2011 Stage Establishments Proportion Establishments Proportion Stage 0 3,256 20% 10,058 30% Stage 1 9,314 57% 18,911 58% Stage 2 3,501 21% 3,260 10% Stage 3 257 1% 256 1% Stage 4 46 1% 32 1% Total 16,374 100% 32,517 100%
  16. 16. 16 Number of jobs by stage/employment category Economy Source: National Establishment Time Series (NETS) – 2011 Database section 03 2000 2011 Stage Jobs Proportion Jobs Proportion Stage 0 3,256 1% 10,058 4% Stage 1 35,916 16% 56,994 25% Stage 2 87,716 39% 82,048 36% Stage 3 43,486 19% 42,370 19% Stage 4 56,055 25% 36,882 16% Total 226,429 100% 228,352 100%
  17. 17. 17 Amount of sales by stage/employment category Economy Source: National Establishment Time Series (NETS) – 2011 Database section 03 2000 2011 Stage Sales Proportion Sales Proportion Stage 0 $319,631,826 1% $673,636,676 3% Stage 1 $4,008,852,759 15% $4,719,109,243 21% Stage 2 $9,024,364,231 34% $7,949,058,309 35% Stage 3 $5,158,581,200 20% $5,877,793,166 26% Stage 4 $7,734,249,838 29% $3,526,973,814 16% Total $26,245,679,854 100% $22,746,571,208 100%
  18. 18. 18 Top five industries in 2012 55.6 percent of jobs are tied to one of the top five industries in Lake County Health Care & Social Assistance is the largest industry sector (34,824 jobs). Accommodation and Food Services is the smallest of the top industry sectors with 18,124 jobs. Economy Source: Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) – Complete Employment section 03 Health Care & Social Assistance 14.4% Government 11.9% Retail Trade 11.3% Manufacturing 10.5% Accommodation & Food Services… All Other Industries 44.4%
  19. 19. 19 Industry distribution and change NAICS Code Description Jobs 2012 % Change (2002-2012) Earnings 2013 11 Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting 639 -10.9% $18,551 21 Mining, Quarrying and Oil and Gas Extraction 176 -27.9% $107,293 22 Utilities 1,730 1.7% $126,479 23 Construction 17,788 25.1% $85,919 31-33 Manufacturing 25,290 -11.7% $107,534 42 Wholesale Trade 6,076 -13.3% $66,946 44-45 Retail Trade 27,407 -4.9% $26,118 48-49 Transportation and Warehousing 10,842 20.7% $53,948 51 Information 1,935 -23.3% $43,244 52 Finance and Insurance 7,201 3.1% $42,461 53 Real Estate and Rental and Leasing 8,339 23.7% $23,385 54 Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 8,829 4.4% $46,116 55 Management of Companies and Enterprises 1,793 36.8% $99,665 56 Administrative and Waste Management 11,827 1.0% $27,577 61 Educational Services (Private) 4,541 56.9% $26,907 62 Health Care and Social Assistance 34,824 20.1% $48,699 71 Arts, Entertainment and Recreation 7,652 -17.1% $28,730 72 Accommodation and Food Services 18,134 17.4% $15,376 81 Other Services (except Public Administration) 18,049 25.9% $20,526 90 Government 28,830 -3.7% $48,730 99 Unclassified Industry <10 - $54,835 All Total 241,901 - $48,711 Economy Source: Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) – 2013.2 Complete Employment section 03
  20. 20. 20 Industry distribution and change The largest employment gains in Lake County occurred in:  Private Educational Services (+56.9 percent)  Management of Companies and Enterprises (+36.8 percent) The largest employment losses occurred in:  Mining,Quarrying and Oil andGas Extraction (-27.9 percent)  Information (-23.3 percent) Economy Source: Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) – 2013.2 Complete Employment section 03 Employment Increase Employment Decrease Changes in the top five industry sectors (2002-2012): HealthCare & Social Assistance Accommodation & Food Services Government RetailTrade Manufacturing
  21. 21. 21 Office & Administrative Support… Sales & Related 12% Food Preparation & Serving… Transportation & Material Moving 7% Production 7% All Other Occupations 53% Top five occupations in 2012 The top five occupations in Lake County represent 47.3 percent of all jobs. Office andAdministrative Support and Sales and Related are the occupations with the largest number of workers. Production occupations is the smallest of the top five occupations in the county (7 percent of jobs). Economy Source: Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) – 2013.2 Complete Employment section 03
  22. 22. 22 SOC Description Jobs 2012 % Change (2002-2012) Hourly Earnings 2013 11 Management 10,733 7.4% $33.50 13 Business and Financial Operations 7,811 12.3% $26.86 15 Computer and Mathematical 1,903 -2.0% $28.88 17 Architecture and Engineering 2,882 -3.4% $35.56 19 Life, Physical and Social Science 1,440 16.7% $28.99 21 Community and Social Service 3,070 9.1% $19.00 23 Legal 1,730 1.9% $45.03 25 Education, Training and Library 12,273 11.0% $20.72 27 Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports and Media 4,752 7.3% $14.79 29 Health Care Practitioners and Technical 14,845 12.4% $32.61 31 Health Care Support 7,494 25.0% $12.47 33 Protective Service 5,396 -8.8% $17.47 35 Food Preparation and Serving Related 19,388 9.6% $9.68 37 Building and Grounds Cleaning Maintenance 8,978 11.4% $11.18 39 Personal Care and Service 15,346 42.0% $10.15 41 Sales and Related 30,286 -0.6% $14.22 43 Office and Administrative Support 30,468 -4.8% $15.13 45 Farming, Fishing and Forestry 224 -10.4% $11.51 47 Construction and Extraction 14,682 18.1% $25.89 49 Installation, Maintenance and Repair 11,186 3.1% $22.67 51 Production 15,967 -8.9% $20.78 53 Transportation and Material Moving 18,194 1.0% $18.01 55 Military 1,672 4.1% $19.39 99 Unclassified 1,181 25.5% $11.18 All Total 241,901 100% $18.91 Occupation distribution and change Economy Source: Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) – 2013.2 Complete Employment section 03
  23. 23. 23 Occupation distribution and change Economy Source: Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) – 2013.2 Complete Employment section 03 The largest percentage gains in jobs in Lake County occurred in:  Personal Care & Service (+42.0 percent)  Health Care Support (+25.0 percent) The largest percentage loss in employment occurred in:  Farming, Fishing & Forestry (-10.4 percent)  Production (-8.9 percent) Changes in the top five occupations (2002- 2012): Food Preparation & Serving Transportation & Material Moving Sales & Related Office & Administrative Production Employment Increase Employment Decrease
  24. 24. 24 Income and poverty 2000 2006 2012 Total Population in Poverty 11.1% 16.7% 19.6% Minors (up to age 17) in Poverty 15.6% 26.5% 31.3% Real Median Income (2012) $53,734 $52,327 $48,015 The median income in Lake County dipped by $5,700 between 2000 and 2012. Both the total population in poverty and the number of minors in poverty increased. The number of minors in poverty doubled between 2000 and 2012. Economy Source: U.S. Census Bureau – Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (SAIPE) section 03
  25. 25. 25 Income and poverty Median income in Lake County has decreased in recent years, while poverty has continued to increase. Economy Source: U.S. Census Bureau – Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (SAIPE) section 03 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 25,000 30,000 35,000 40,000 45,000 50,000 55,000 60,000 PopulationinPoverty(percent) RealMedianIncomein2012(dollars) Median Income Minors in Poverty All Ages in Poverty
  26. 26. 26 Takeaways All establishment growth in Lake County occurred in businesses having fewer than 10 employees. So, focusing on the needs of the self-employed (Stage 0) and start-ups (Stage 1) establishments may be worthwhile. The food industry, health care, management, education and transportation are employment growth areas for Lake County.These are industries and occupations that demand workers with varying educational levels. Median income has decreased and poverty has increased in Lake County since 2000. Lake County might focus on policies and programs that strengthen high-growth Stage 2 firms since they employ several people and capture sizable sales. Promoting job growth for occupations requiring educated workers could help retain adults with higher educational attainment and help increase median income. Services targeted to poverty-stricken individuals should be considered given the dramatic rise in poverty, especially among children under 18 years old. Economy section 03
  27. 27. Labor force and unemployment Laborshed Commuteshed Takeaways 04 labor market
  28. 28. 28 Labor force and unemployment 2002 2012 Labor Force 227,989 220,793 Unemployment Rate 6.4% 9.2% The labor force in Lake County decreased by 3.1 percent between 2002 and 2012. This decrease is likely due to a rise in the number of individuals who are either officially unemployed or who have given up looking for a job. Labor market Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics – Local Area Unemployment Statistics section 04
  29. 29. 29 Unemployment rate Between 2002 and 2012, the unemployment rate in Lake County peaked at 10.9 percent in 2010. Labor market Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics – Local Area Unemployment Statistics section 04 3.6% 6.4% 5.2% 10.9% 9.2% 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 UnemploymentRate(%) Year
  30. 30. 30 Commuteshed A county’s commuteshed is the geographic area to which its work force travels to work. Forty-one percent of employed residents in Lake County commute to jobs located outside of Lake County. The top commuteshed counties for Lake County residents who work outside of the county are Cook County, Illinois, and Porter County, Indiana. Labor market Source: U.S. Census Bureau – Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) section 04 83,806 Out-Commuters 120,585 Same Work/ Home Commuters Proportion Cook, IL 39,960 19.6% Porter, IN 11,061 5.4% Marion, IN 5,295 2.6% Will, IL 3,341 1.6% DuPage, IL 3,156 1.5%
  31. 31. 31 Laborshed Commuters Proportion Porter, IN 25,554 13.2% Cook, IL 14,026 7.2% La Porte, IN 4,685 2.4% Jasper, IN 3,131 1.6% Marion, IN 2,527 1.3% Labor market Source: U.S. Census Bureau – Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) section 04 72,982 In-Commuters 120,585 Same Work/ Home A county’s laborshed is the geographic area from which it draws employees. Thirty-eight percent of individuals working in Lake County commute from another county for work. Porter County, Indiana, and Cook County, Illinois, are the biggest sources of outside labor for Lake County. Sixty-four percent of in-commuters reside in counties adjacent to Lake County; however, the fifth largest laborshed county is the Indianapolis metropolitan area (Marion County, Indiana).
  32. 32. 32 Commuteshed in 2011 Labor market section 04 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, OTM, LEHD, PCRD Eighty percent of Lake County’s working residents are employed either in Lake or Cook Counties. Another 5 percent commute to Porter, while an additional 5 percent travel to jobs in DuPage, Will, LaPorte or Marion Counties Collectively, these seven counties represent 90 percent of the commuteshed for Lake County.
  33. 33. 33 Laborshed in 2011 Labor market section 04 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, OTM, LEHD, PCRD The bulk (80 percent) of Lake County’s workforce is drawn from Lake and Porter Counties. Another 5 percent is drawn from LaPorte County in Indiana and Cook County in Illinois. An additional 5 percent comes from Will County in Illinois and Saint Joseph, Jasper and Marion Counties in Indiana. Combined, the eight counties represent 90 percent of Lake County’s laborshed.
  34. 34. 34 Takeaways Lake County’s unemployment rate has increased since 2002.The majority of this increase occurred during the period of the Great Recession (approximately 2009 to 2010). Despite population increases, the county’s labor force has decreased since 2002, indicating that there may be an increasing number of individuals who are unemployed or are discouraged workers (workers who have given up trying to find a job). Employees that work but do not live in Lake County tend to commute from surrounding counties. People who commute out of the county for work tend to travel to other metropolitan areas. Lake County should assess if a major workforce development training effort should be targeted to the growing number of working age adults struggling to find jobs. The laborshed and commuteshed data offer solid evidence of the value of pursuing economic and workforce development on a regional (multi- county) basis. Labor market section 04
  35. 35. 35 . Report Contributors This report was prepared by the Purdue Center for Regional Development in partnership with Purdue University Extension. Labor market section 04 Data Analysis Indraneel Kumar, Ph.D. Ayoung Kim Report Authors Elizabeth Dobis Bo Beaulieu, Ph.D. Report Design Tyler Wright Adeline Jackson It is the policy of the Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service that all persons have equal opportunity and access to its educational programs, services, activities, and facilities without regard to race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or ancestry, marital status, parental status, sexual orientation, disability or status as a veteran. Purdue University is an Affirmative Action institution. This material may be available in alternative formats.
  36. 36. FOR MORE INFORMATION Purdue Center for Regional Development (PCRD) . . . seeks to pioneer new ideas and strategies that contribute to regional collaboration, innovation and prosperity. Purdue Extension Community Development (CD) . . . works to strengthen the capacity of local leaders, residents and organizations to work together to develop and sustain strong, vibrant communities. OR Please contact Janet Reed Extension Educator 219-755-3240 reedjm@purdue.edu

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