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Data SnapShot Series 1.1
June 2015
DATA SNAPSHOT
Tippecanoe County
Table of contents
Introduction
01
Demography
02
Economy
03
Labor Market
04
Purpose
About Tippecanoe County
01
introduction
4
Purpose
This document provides information
and data about Tippecanoe County
that can be used to guide local
decision-mak...
5
About Tippecanoe County
Introduction
section 01
County Background
Established 1826
County
Seat
Lafayette
Area 503 sq. mi...
Population change
Population pyramids
Race
Ethnicity
Educational attainment
Takeaways
02
demograph
y
7
148,955
172,780 180,174 190,530
Population change
Components of Population Change, 2000-
2013
Total Change 26,102*
Natur...
8
6.2%
7.5%
14.4%
6.1%
5.2%
5.1%
3.7%
1.8%
1.0%
5.9%
6.9%
11.7%
5.7%
5.2%
5.4%
4.1%
2.3%
1.7%
15 12 9 6 3 0 3 6 9 12 15
0-...
9
White
86%
Other
14%
Black, 4.7%
Asian, 6.8%
Native, 0.4%
Two or More
Races, 1.9%
White
92%
Other
8%
Black, 2.6%
Asian, 4...
10
Ethnicity
Hispanics are individuals of
any race whose ancestry is
from Mexico, Puerto Rico,
Cuba, Spain, the Dominican
...
11
No High
School, 9%
High
School,
28%
Some
College,
19%
Associate's
Degree, 7%
Bachelor's
Degree or
More, 36%
No High
Sch...
12
Takeaways
Demography
section 02
The population of Tippecanoe County is
expected to grow over the next few years,
though...
13
Establishments
Components of Change for Establishments
Total Change (2000-11) 4,360
Natural Change (births
minus deaths...
14
Number of establishments by
stage/employment category
Economy
Source: National Establishment Time Series (NETS) – 2012 ...
15
Top five employers in 2015
Economy
Source: ReferenceUSA (Infogroup)
section 03
Establishment Stage
1.
Purdue University...
16
Number of jobs by stage/employment
category
Economy
Source: National Establishment Time Series (NETS) – 2012 Database
s...
17
Amount of sales (2011 dollars) by
stage/employment category
Economy
Source: National Establishment Time Series (NETS) –...
18
Government
23.5%
Manufacturing
13.7%
Health Care &
Social Assistance
11.2%
Retail Trade
10.3%
Accommodation
& Food Serv...
19
Industry distribution and change
NAICS
Code
Description
Jobs
2002
Jobs
2013
Change
(2002-2013)
% Change
(2002-2013)
Ave...
20
Industry distribution and change
The largest percentage gains
in employment in Tippecanoe
County occurred in:
 Adminis...
21
Office &
Administrative
Support
14.1%
Sales & Related
10.9%
Production
10.8%
Food Preparation
& Serving
Related
8.3%
Ed...
22
SOC Description
Jobs
2002
Jobs
2013
Change
(2002-2013)
% Change
(2002-2013)
Hourly
Earnings 2013
11 Management 4,637 4,...
23
Occupation distribution and change
Economy
Source: Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) – 2014.3 – QCEW E...
24
Income and poverty
2000 2006 2013
Total Population in
Poverty
10.0% 17.0% 19.6%
Minors (up to age 17)
in Poverty
10.9% ...
25
0
4
8
12
16
20
24
25,000
30,000
35,000
40,000
45,000
50,000
55,000
PopulationinPoverty(percent)
RealIncomein2013(dollar...
26
Takeaways
Growth in the number of establishments in
Tippecanoe County occurred mainly in
businesses having fewer than 1...
Labor force and
unemployment
Commuteshed
Laborshed
Workforce
inflow/outflow
Takeaways
04
labor
market
28
Labor force and unemployment
2002 2013
Labor Force 79,973 80,066
Unemployment
Rate
4.3% 6.8%
The size of the labor forc...
29
2.5%
4.8%
4.0%
9.1%
6.8%
0.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
5.0
6.0
7.0
8.0
9.0
10.0
UnemploymentRate(percent)
Unemployment rate
Unemp...
30
Commuteshed
A county’s commuteshed is the
geographic area to which its resident
labor force travels to work.
Thirty-fou...
31
Commuteshed in 2011
Labor market
section 04
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, OTM, LEHD, PCRD
Seventy percent of Tippecanoe
C...
32
Laborshed
Commuters Proportion
Carroll, IN 2,660 3.3%
Clinton, IN 2,649 3.3%
Marion, IN 2,538 3.2%
White, IN 2,417 3.0%...
33
Laborshed in 2011
Labor market
section 04
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, OTM, LEHD, PCRD
The bulk (70 percent) of
Tippecan...
34
Workforce inflow and outflow in 2011
Labor market
section 04
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, OTM, LEHD, PCRD
Tippecanoe Cou...
35
Takeaways
The Great Recession that impacted the U.S.
economy between 2007 and 2009 took a major
toll on employment in T...
36
Notes
LAUS (Local Area Unemployment Statistics):
LAUS is a U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) program
that provides ...
37
Report Contributors
This report was prepared by the Purdue Center for Regional Development in
partnership with Purdue U...
FOR MORE
INFORMATION
Purdue Center for Regional Development
(PCRD) . . .
seeks to pioneer new ideas and strategies that
co...
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Tippecanoe County SnapShot

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Tippecanoe County SnapShot

  1. 1. Data SnapShot Series 1.1 June 2015 DATA SNAPSHOT Tippecanoe County
  2. 2. Table of contents Introduction 01 Demography 02 Economy 03 Labor Market 04
  3. 3. Purpose About Tippecanoe County 01 introduction
  4. 4. 4 Purpose This document provides information and data about Tippecanoe County that can be used to guide local decision-making activities. The Data SnapShot showcases a variety of demographic, economic and labor market information that local leaders, community organizations and others can use to gain a better perspective on current conditions and opportunities in their county. To strengthen the value and usability of the information, we showcase the data using a variety of visual tools, such as charts, graphs and tables. In addition, we offer key points about the data as a way of assisting the user with the interpretation of the information presented. Finally, short takeaway messages are offered at the end of each section in order to highlight some of the more salient findings. Introduction section 01
  5. 5. 5 About Tippecanoe County Introduction section 01 County Background Established 1826 County Seat Lafayette Area 503 sq. mi. Neighboring Counties Benton, IN Carroll, IN Clinton, IN Fountain, IN Montgomery, IN Warren, IN White, IN
  6. 6. Population change Population pyramids Race Ethnicity Educational attainment Takeaways 02 demograph y
  7. 7. 7 148,955 172,780 180,174 190,530 Population change Components of Population Change, 2000- 2013 Total Change 26,102* Natural Increase 14,725 International Migration 11,693 Domestic Migration 559 The total population is projected to increase by 6 percent between 2013 and 2020. Demography Sources: STATSIndiana, U.S. Census Bureau – 2000 Decennial Census, 2010 Decennial Census, 2013 Estimates, Estimates of the Components of Resident Population Change section 02 The county’s total population increased by 21 percent between 2000 and 2013. Natural increase (births minus deaths over that span of time) was the largest contributor to that expansion, with a gain of over 14,700 persons. International migration also increased by almost 11,700 individuals, indicating that the county experienced a large influx of new people from outside the United States. The growth is likely due to the presence of Purdue University and the recruitment and expansion of industries with a global reach. In contrast, domestic migration (difference between the number of people moving into the county versus moving out) resulted in a relatively small gain of 559 individuals in the county between 2000 and 2013. Total population projections 2000 2010 2013 2020 *Total change in population differs from the sum of the components due to Census estimation techniques. Residuals (not reported here) make up the difference.
  8. 8. 8 6.2% 7.5% 14.4% 6.1% 5.2% 5.1% 3.7% 1.8% 1.0% 5.9% 6.9% 11.7% 5.7% 5.2% 5.4% 4.1% 2.3% 1.7% 15 12 9 6 3 0 3 6 9 12 15 0-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70-79 80+ Percent of Total PopulationAgeCohort 6.1% 9.0% 14.2% 6.7% 6.0% 4.2% 2.5% 1.8% 0.8% 5.8% 7.9% 11.4% 6.2% 6.2% 4.4% 2.7% 2.5% 1.7% 15 12 9 6 3 0 3 6 9 12 15 0-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70-79 80+ Percent of Total Population AgeCohort Population pyramids Population pyramids are visual representations of the age distribution of the population by gender. Approximately 48.7 percent of the population was female in 2000 (72,532 people) and that percentage remained about the same in 2013. What did change is the distribution of people across the various age categories. A larger share of people shifted into the higher age groupings over the 2000 to 2013 time period. Demography Source: U.S. Census Bureau – 2000 Decennial Census and 2013 Annual Population Estimates section 02 People 50 and over increased from 9.3% to 11.7% for males and from 11.3% to 13.5% for females between 2000 and 2013. Individuals of prime working age (20-49) dipped from 26.9% to 25.7% for males and from 23.7% to 22.6% for females. Residents under 20 years of age decreased from 28.8% to 26.5% of the total population. Male Female 20132000 Male Female
  9. 9. 9 White 86% Other 14% Black, 4.7% Asian, 6.8% Native, 0.4% Two or More Races, 1.9% White 92% Other 8% Black, 2.6% Asian, 4.5% Native, 0.3% Two or More Races, 1.0% Race The proportion of non-White residents in Tippecanoe County increased by 75 percent between 2000 and 2013. Every race experienced a numerical increase over the time period. Of the non- White races, the Asian (+5,494) and Black (+4,706) populations gained the most. Proportionally, individuals identifying themselves as Two or More Races (+147%) and Black (+122%) gained the most. The White population increased by 18,640 residents between 2000 and 2013 but represents a smaller percentage growth relative to some of the other racial groups. Demography Source: U.S. Census Bureau – 2000 Decennial Census and 2013 Annual Population Estimates section 02 2000 2013
  10. 10. 10 Ethnicity Hispanics are individuals of any race whose ancestry is from Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Spain, the Dominican Republic or any other Spanish-speaking Central or South American country. There were 7,831 Hispanics residing in Tippecanoe County in 2000. This figure expanded to 14,285 by 2013, an 82.4 percent increase. Due to this numeric increase, the proportion of Hispanics in the population is now around 8 percent. Demography Source: U.S. Census Bureau – 2000 Decennial Census and 2013 Annual Population Estimates section 02 8% 5% Hispanics - 2000 Hispanics - 2013
  11. 11. 11 No High School, 9% High School, 28% Some College, 19% Associate's Degree, 7% Bachelor's Degree or More, 36% No High School, 12% High School, 31% Some College, 19% Associate's Degree, 5% Bachelor's Degree or More, 33% Educational attainment Tippecanoe County had a 5 percentage point increase in the number of adults (25 and older) with an associate’s, bachelor’s or graduate degree from 2000 to 2013. The proportion of adults 25 years of age and older with a high school education or more improved from 88 percent in 2000 to 91 percent by 2013. Those with only a high school degree fell slightly from 31 percent in 2000 to 28 percent in 2013. Adults with a college degree increased from 38 percent in 2000 to 43 percent in 2013. This was due to a 2 percentage point increase in the proportion of residents with associate’s degrees (5 percent versus 7 percent), while the proportion of adults with at least a bachelor's degree increased from 33 percent to 36 percent, a 3 percentage point growth. . Demography Source: U.S. Census Bureau – 2000 Decennial Census and 2013 ACS section 02 2000 2013
  12. 12. 12 Takeaways Demography section 02 The population of Tippecanoe County is expected to grow over the next few years, though not as quickly as between 2000 and 2013. If past trends hold, that increase will be the result of natural increase (more births than deaths) as well as international migration. The age composition of Tippecanoe County’s population has two main features. First, one finds an aging population in which the percentage of people 50 and older is gradually increasing. Second, the largest proportion of the population is between 20 and 29 years of age, and this group comprises over a quarter of the population. The racial and ethnic diversity of Tippecanoe County has nearly doubled since 2000, but the county remains primarily white and non- Hispanic. The educational attainment of adults 25 and over has improved since 2000, and the percentage of adults with a high school education or less (37 percent) is one of the smallest in the state. The number of adults with at least a college degree has also continued to grow (43 percent), and this group now comprises a larger proportion of the population than those who have attained a high school degree or less. Therefore, two in five adult residents of the county have an associate’s, bachelor’s or higher degree, which is 11 percentage points above the figure for the state of Indiana as a whole. The impact of Purdue University and Ivy Tech Community College on the demographics of Tippecanoe County is evident in the large numbers of international migrants and young adults (20-29). Their presence has also contributed to a high level of racial and ethnic diversity and impressive educational attainment of adults 25 years old and over relative to other Indiana counties. Tippecanoe County should continue to develop the mix of jobs, services and amenities that will retain and attract educated young adults.
  13. 13. 13 Establishments Components of Change for Establishments Total Change (2000-11) 4,360 Natural Change (births minus deaths) 4,179 Net Migration 181 The number of establishments in Tippecanoe County increased 78 percent from 2000 to 2011. The rapid growth of establishments was largely due to natural change. That is, 10,289 establishments were launched in the county between 2000 and 2011, while 6,110 closed, resulting in a gain of 4,179 establishments. There was a gain of 181 establishments due to net migration. Economy Source: National Establishment Time Series (NETS) – 2012 Database section 03 An establishment is a physical business location. Branches, standalones and headquarters are all considered types of establishments. Definition of Company Stages 0 1 2 3 4 Self- employed 2-9 employees 10-99 employees 100-499 employees 500+ employees Note: The 2011 figures use 2012 data to include all gains and losses over the entire year. Establishment information was calculated in-house and may differ slightly from publicly available data.
  14. 14. 14 Number of establishments by stage/employment category Economy Source: National Establishment Time Series (NETS) – 2012 Database section 03 2000 2011 Stage Establishments Proportion Establishments Proportion Stage 0 1,304 23% 2,944 30% Stage 1 3,093 55% 5,750 58% Stage 2 1,094 19% 1,147 12% Stage 3 99 2% 113 1% Stage 4 21 0% 17* 0% Total 5,611 100% 9,971 100% Note: The 2011 figures use 2012 data to include all gains and losses over the entire year. The NETS Database is derived from the Dun & Bradstreet archival national establishment data, a population of known establishments in the United States that is quality controlled and updated annually. Establishments include both private and public sector business units and range in size from one employee (i.e., sole-proprietors and self-employed) to several thousand employees. *ReferenceUSA indicates 12 Stage 4 firms in 2011 (that also existed in 2015), whereas NETS shows 17 Stage 4 firms. Additional information is available on the next slide.
  15. 15. 15 Top five employers in 2015 Economy Source: ReferenceUSA (Infogroup) section 03 Establishment Stage 1. Purdue University – West Lafayette Stage 4 2. Subaru-Indiana Automotive, Inc. Stage 4 3. Caterpillar, Inc. Stage 4 4. Wabash National Corporation Stage 4 5. Fairfield Manufacturing Company, Inc. Stage 4 The top five employers produce mainly national and global goods and services. Purdue University in West Lafayette is the largest establishment-level employer in Tippecanoe County. Their graduates are employed locally and throughout the world. The other four top employers produce goods used globally. Subaru-Indiana Automotive and Wabash National manufacture vehicles, while Caterpillar and Fairfield Manufacturing produce mechanical parts.Information on the top 5 establishments by employment comes from ReferenceUSA. ReferenceUSA is a library database service provided by Infogroup, the company that also supplies the list of major employers for Hoosiers by the Numbers. While both NETS and ReferenceUSA contain establishments, differences in data collection procedures result in discrepancies between the two sources. We use NETS for a broad picture of establishments in the county, while ReferenceUSA is used for studying individual establishments.
  16. 16. 16 Number of jobs by stage/employment category Economy Source: National Establishment Time Series (NETS) – 2012 Database section 03 2000 2011 Stage Jobs* Proportion Jobs* Proportion Stage 0 1,304 1% 2,944 3% Stage 1 11,963 12% 17,954 17% Stage 2 28,417 28% 31,467 29% Stage 3 18,325 18% 19,184 18% Stage 4 41,447 41% 36,330 34% Total 101,456 100% 107,879 100% Note: The 2011 figures use 2012 data to include all gains and losses over the entire year. *Includes both full-time and part-time jobs
  17. 17. 17 Amount of sales (2011 dollars) by stage/employment category Economy Source: National Establishment Time Series (NETS) – 2012 Database section 03 2000 2011 Stage Sales Proportion Sales Proportion Stage 0 $167,797,738 1% $205,190,070 2% Stage 1 $1,515,583,690 13% $1,516,138,889 16% Stage 2 $3,428,402,315 30% $2,758,428,450 30% Stage 3 $2,302,950,710 20% $1,846,730,177 20% Stage 4 $4,187,765,802 36% $3,016,350,441 32% Total $11,602,500,255 100% $9,342,838,027 100% Note: The 2011 figures use 2012 data to include all gains and losses over the entire year.
  18. 18. 18 Government 23.5% Manufacturing 13.7% Health Care & Social Assistance 11.2% Retail Trade 10.3% Accommodation & Food Services 8.0% All Other Industries 33.3% Top five industries in 2013 66.6 percent of jobs are tied to one of the top five industries in Tippecanoe County. Government is the largest industry sector with 23,859 jobs, which includes Purdue University employees. Accommodation & Food Services is the smallest of the top five industry sectors with 8,096 jobs. Of the top industries in Tippecanoe County, three gained jobs between 2002 and 2013. Of these, Health Care & Social Assistance experienced the largest percentage job growth (+29.0 percent), followed by Accommodation & Food Services and Government. Manufacturing lost the most, with a 13.9 percent loss in jobs over the time period. Economy Source: Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) – 2014.3 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors section 03
  19. 19. 19 Industry distribution and change NAICS Code Description Jobs 2002 Jobs 2013 Change (2002-2013) % Change (2002-2013) Average Total Earnings 2013 11 Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting 1,129 992 -137 -12% $34,306 21 Mining, Quarrying, & Oil & Gas Extraction 43 19 -24 -56% $165,238 22 Utilities 99 91 -8 -8% $97,721 23 Construction 4,691 3,556 -1,135 -24% $43,204 31-33 Manufacturing 16,161 13,914 -2,247 -14% $76,608 42 Wholesale Trade 1,473 1,953 480 33% $57,043 44-45 Retail Trade 10,753 10,457 -296 -3% $25,643 48-49 Transportation & Warehousing 1,826 1,908 82 4% $47,864 51 Information 1,227 1,261 34 3% $37,172 52 Finance & Insurance 3,290 3,406 116 4% $64,133 53 Real Estate & Rental & Leasing 2,524 3,495 971 38% $34,370 54 Professional, Scientific & Technical Services 3,275 4,465 1,190 36% $47,827 55 Management of Companies and Enterprises 271 235 -36 -14% $91,464 56 Administrative & Waste Management 2,950 5,332 2,382 81% $25,810 61 Educational Services (Private) 679 977 298 44% $15,978 62 Health Care & Social Assistance 8,784 11,334 2,550 29% $49,862 71 Arts, Entertainment & Recreation 1,038 1,194 156 15% $13,063 72 Accommodation and Food Services 7,042 8,096 1,054 15% $16,795 81 Other Services (except Public Administration) 4,275 4,948 673 16% $22,944 90 Government 21,328 23,859 2,531 12% $55,726 99 Unclassified Industry 12 <10 - - - All Total 92,871 101,494 8,623 9% $45,890 Economy Source: Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) – 2014.3 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors section 03Note: Average total earnings include wages, salaries, supplements and earnings from Industries and occupations with a value of <10 have insufficient data for change and earnings calculations.
  20. 20. 20 Industry distribution and change The largest percentage gains in employment in Tippecanoe County occurred in:  Administrative, Support, Waste Management, and Remediation Services (+80.7 percent)  Educational Services, private (+44.0 percent) The largest percentage losses in employment occurred in:  Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction (-56.1 percent)  Construction (-24.2 percent) Economy Source: Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) – 2014.3 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors section 03 Employment Increase Employment Decrease Industries with the largest gains and losses in employment numbers between 2002 & 2013: Health Care & Social Assistance (+2,550) Government (+2,531) Administrative & Waste Management (+2,382) Manufacturing (-2,247) Construction (-1,135)
  21. 21. 21 Office & Administrative Support 14.1% Sales & Related 10.9% Production 10.8% Food Preparation & Serving Related 8.3% Education, Training, & Library 7.8% All Other Occupations 48.1% Top five occupations in 2013 The top five occupations in Tippecanoe County represent 51.9 percent of all jobs. Office & Administrative Support (14,349 jobs) is the top occupation classification in Tippecanoe County at 14.1 percent. The smallest of these is Education, Training, & Library with 7,910 jobs (7.8 percent). All five top occupations in Tippecanoe County, except Production (-5.8 percent), had an increase in jobs between 2002 and 2013. Education, Training, & Library (+16.8 percent) and Food Preparation & Serving Related (+16.4 percent) occupations experienced the largest percentage gains while Office & Administrative Support occupations gained the least (+6.5 percent) over the time period. Economy Source: Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) – 2014.3 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors section 03
  22. 22. 22 SOC Description Jobs 2002 Jobs 2013 Change (2002-2013) % Change (2002-2013) Hourly Earnings 2013 11 Management 4,637 4,982 345 7% $32.82 13 Business & Financial Operations 3,270 3,525 255 8% $27.89 15 Computer & Mathematical 1,284 1,381 97 8% $26.55 17 Architecture & Engineering 1,491 1,406 -85 -6% $34.92 19 Life, Physical & Social Science 1,884 2,176 292 15% $25.23 21 Community & Social Service 1,277 1,466 189 15% $19.93 23 Legal 350 349 -1 0% $33.22 25 Education, Training & Library 6,770 7,910 1,140 17% $26.29 27 Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports & Media 2,150 2,555 405 19% $15.99 29 Health Care Practitioners & Technical 5,194 6,436 1,242 24% $36.18 31 Health Care Support 1,819 2,437 618 34% $13.35 33 Protective Service 1,188 1,727 539 45% $17.23 35 Food Preparation & Serving Related 7,239 8,429 1,190 16% $9.17 37 Building & Grounds Cleaning Maintenance 3,128 3,791 663 21% $10.47 39 Personal Care & Service 2,953 3,808 855 29% $9.84 41 Sales & Related 10,121 11,045 924 9% $14.70 43 Office & Administrative Support 13,469 14,349 880 7% $14.49 45 Farming, Fishing & Forestry 369 316 -53 -14% $12.69 47 Construction & Extraction 3,999 3,211 -788 -20% $19.89 49 Installation, Maintenance & Repair 3,239 3,363 124 4% $18.64 51 Production 11,602 10,931 -671 -6% $19.57 53 Transportation & Material Moving 4,621 4,843 222 5% $16.74 55 Military 540 610 70 13% $19.70 99 Unclassified 276 449 173 63% $11.14 All Total 92,871 101,494 8,623 9% $19.26 Occupation distribution and change Economy Source: Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) – 2014.3 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors section 03
  23. 23. 23 Occupation distribution and change Economy Source: Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) – 2014.3 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors section 03 The largest percentage gains in employment in Tippecanoe County occurred in:*  Protective Service (+45.4 percent)  Healthcare Support (+34.0 percent) The largest percentage loss in employment occurred in:  Construction and Extraction (-19.7 percent)  Farming, Fishing, and Forestry (-14.4 percent) Occupations with the largest gains and losses in employment numbers between 2002 & 2013: Healthcare Practitioners (+1,242) Food Preparation (+1,190) Education, Training, & Library (+1,140) Construction & Extraction (-788) Production (-671) Employment Increase Employment Decrease *Unclassified occupations actually experienced the largest percentage gains in employment at 62.7 percent, but since this is difficult to classify, it was excluded.
  24. 24. 24 Income and poverty 2000 2006 2013 Total Population in Poverty 10.0% 17.0% 19.6% Minors (up to age 17) in Poverty 10.9% 16.4% 18.5% Real Median Household Income (2013)* $49,187 $46,386 $47,808 Real Per Capita Income (2013)* $32,974 $33,224 $32,961 The median household income in Tippecanoe County dipped by $1,400 between 2000 and 2013 in real dollars (that is, adjusted for inflation), while average income per person remained about the same over the same time period. The total population in poverty and the number of minors in poverty almost doubled between 2000 and 2013. Nearly one in five minors was living in poverty in 2013. Economy Source: U.S. Census Bureau – Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (SAIPE) and U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis – Regional Personal Income Summary section 03 *Real median household income is the middle income value in the county. Half of the county’s households fall above this line and half below. Real per capita personal income is the average income per person in the county.
  25. 25. 25 0 4 8 12 16 20 24 25,000 30,000 35,000 40,000 45,000 50,000 55,000 PopulationinPoverty(percent) RealIncomein2013(dollars) Median Household Income Minors in Poverty All Ages in Poverty Per Capita Income Income and poverty Median household income in Tippecanoe County decreased between 2000 and 2012 but has stabilized since 2009. The latest figures (2013) suggest that median household income is now improving. Per capita income has remained fairly constant since 2000. Poverty rates for both adults and minors have tended to rise at various points over the 2004 to 2009 period. However, both have declined over the past two years, although the rates remain relatively high in contrast to the figures in 2000. Economy Source: U.S. Census Bureau – Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (SAIPE) and U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis – Regional Personal Income Summary section 03
  26. 26. 26 Takeaways Growth in the number of establishments in Tippecanoe County occurred mainly in businesses having fewer than 10 employees (the self-employed and Stage 1 enterprises), components of the local economy that are often overlooked by local leaders. Tippecanoe County might consider focusing on economic development efforts that seek to strengthen high-growth Stage 1 and 2 establishments aside from Stage 3 and 4 establishments, since they employ several people and capture sizable sales, although these sales have suffered in recent years. Real median income has gradually decreased, real per capita income has remained constant, and poverty has increased in Tippecanoe County since 2000. While poverty rates for minors and the total population have decreased since 2011, they remain almost two times higher than in 2000. The gradual decline in real median income experienced between 2000 and 2013 may be tied to employment changes in various industries in the county during that time period. Between 2002 and 2013, high-paying manufacturing industry jobs (yearly earnings of $77,000) declined, while moderate and lower paying industries, such as Health Care & Social Assistance ($50,000) and Administrative Support ($26,000) grew in Tippecanoe County. Occupations showed the same trend, as moderate-paying Construction and Production jobs ($20 per hour) were lost and a mix of high- paying (Education, Training, & Library–$26 per hour, Healthcare Practitioners–$36 per hour) and low-paying (Food Preparation–$9 per hour) jobs were gained. Promoting job growth for occupations requiring educated workers could help retain adults with higher educational attainment, particularly Purdue University and Ivy Tech Community College graduates and help increase median household income in the county. At the same time, efforts to reskill or retrain workers who lack the skills to compete for middle-skilled jobs in the county will be critical to meeting the needs of some key industry sectors. Economy section 03
  27. 27. Labor force and unemployment Commuteshed Laborshed Workforce inflow/outflow Takeaways 04 labor market
  28. 28. 28 Labor force and unemployment 2002 2013 Labor Force 79,973 80,066 Unemployment Rate 4.3% 6.8% The size of the labor force in Tippecanoe County remained unchanged between 2002 and 2013. The simultaneous increase in the unemployment rate is likely due to a rise in the number of individuals who are either officially unemployed or who have given up looking for a job. Labor market Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics – Local Area Unemployment Statistics (2013 Annual Data Release) section 04
  29. 29. 29 2.5% 4.8% 4.0% 9.1% 6.8% 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 9.0 10.0 UnemploymentRate(percent) Unemployment rate Unemployment increased dramatically after 2007, peaking at 9.1 percent in 2009. Since that time, the rate has been on a slow but steady decline, dipping to 6.8 percent by 2013. Labor market Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics – Local Area Unemployment Statistics (2013 Annual Data Release) section 04
  30. 30. 30 Commuteshed A county’s commuteshed is the geographic area to which its resident labor force travels to work. Thirty-four percent of employed residents in Tippecanoe County commute to jobs located outside of the county. Marion County is the biggest destination for residents who work outside of Tippecanoe County. Six percent of out-commuters work in counties adjacent to Tippecanoe County. However, the largest work destinations outside of Tippecanoe County are the Indianapolis (Marion and Hamilton Counties), Fort Wayne (Allen County), and Chicago (Lake County) metropolitan areas, respectively. Labor market Source: U.S. Census Bureau – Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) section 04 23,597 Out-Commuters 44,748 Same Work/ Home Commuters Proportion Marion, IN 4,929 7.2% Hamilton, IN 1,425 2.1% Allen, IN 1,081 1.6% Lake, IN 1,009 1.5% Clinton, IN 941 1.4%
  31. 31. 31 Commuteshed in 2011 Labor market section 04 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, OTM, LEHD, PCRD Seventy percent of Tippecanoe County’s working residents are employed within the county. Another 5 percent commute to Hamilton and Marion Counties. An additional 5 percent travel to jobs in Allen, Clinton, Lake or Ripley Counties. Collectively, these seven counties represent 80 percent of the commuteshed for Tippecanoe County.
  32. 32. 32 Laborshed Commuters Proportion Carroll, IN 2,660 3.3% Clinton, IN 2,649 3.3% Marion, IN 2,538 3.2% White, IN 2,417 3.0% Montgomery, IN 1,670 2.1% Labor market Source: U.S. Census Bureau – Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) section 04 35,578 In-Commuters 44,748 Same Work/ Home A county’s laborshed is the geographic area from which it draws employees. Forty-four percent of individuals working in Tippecanoe County commute from another county. Sixteen percent of in-commuters reside in counties adjacent to Tippecanoe County, and four of the five top counties in the laborshed are adjacent counties. Of these counties, Carroll County is the largest source of labor outside of Tippecanoe County, while Montgomery County is the smallest.
  33. 33. 33 Laborshed in 2011 Labor market section 04 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, OTM, LEHD, PCRD The bulk (70 percent) of Tippecanoe County’s workforce is drawn from Carroll, Clinton, Marion, Montgomery, Tippecanoe and White Counties in Indiana. Another 5 percent is drawn from Allen, Benton, Fountain and Warren Counties. An additional 5 percent reside in Hamilton and Lake Counties in Indiana. Combined, the 12 counties represent 80 percent of Tippecanoe County’s laborshed.
  34. 34. 34 Workforce inflow and outflow in 2011 Labor market section 04 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, OTM, LEHD, PCRD Tippecanoe County has more laborers traveling into the county for work than out of the county for work. Net commuting is negative, with a gain of 11,981 commuters. The resulting situation is that for every 100 employed residents, Tippecanoe County has 118 jobs. Count Proportio n Employed in Tippecanoe County 80,326 100% Both employed and living in the county 44,748 56% Employed in the county but living outside 35,578 44% Living in Tippecanoe County 68,345 100% Both living and employed in the county 44,748 65% Living in the county but employed outside 23,597 35% 35,578 23,597 44,748
  35. 35. 35 Takeaways The Great Recession that impacted the U.S. economy between 2007 and 2009 took a major toll on employment in Tippecanoe County. While the unemployment rate was quite low in 2000, it more than tripled to over 9 percent by 2009. Recent figures make clear that the unemployment rate has improved significantly since 2009. Despite the increase in the population over the past decade or more, the size of the county’s labor force has not changed since 2002. This may be due to a modest growth in the number of residents that are past retirement age in the county. The unemployment rate is also higher than in 2000, possibly because, as a result of the improving economy, an increasing number of unemployed individuals who previously were discouraged workers have reentered the labor market and started looking for a job. Approximately 34 percent of Tippecanoe County residents in the workforce are gainfully employed outside of the county, while 44 percent of individuals employed in Tippecanoe County are not county residents, making it a regional employment center. It may be worthwhile for local leaders and industries to determine the human capital attributes of workers who commute to jobs inside and outside the county. By so doing, they could determine whether there is leakage of educated and skilled workers to surrounding counties. The types of workers being drawn from surrounding counties is also worth exploring. Such an analysis will help determine the mix of human capital attributes that are needed to spur the growth of good paying jobs in the county. The laborshed and commuteshed data offer solid evidence of the value of pursuing economic and workforce development on a regional (multi-county) basis. Labor market section 04
  36. 36. 36 Notes LAUS (Local Area Unemployment Statistics): LAUS is a U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) program that provides monthly and annual labor force, employment and unemployment data by place of residence at various geographic levels. LAUS utilizes statistical models to estimate data values based on household surveys and employer reports. These estimates are updated annually. Annual county-level LAUS estimates do not include seasonal adjustments. LEHD (Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics): LEHD is a partnership between U.S. Census Bureau and State Department of Workforce Development (DWD) to provide labor market and journey to work data at various geographic levels. LEHD uses Unemployment Insurance earnings data and Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages from DWDs and census administrative records related to individuals and businesses. NETS (National Establishment Time Series): NETS is an establishment-level database, not a company- level database. This means that each entry is a different physical location, and company-level information must be created by adding the separate establishment components. OTM (On the Map): OTM, a product of LEHD program, is used in the county snapshot report to develop commuting patterns for a geography from two perspectives: place of residence and place of work. At the highly detailed level of census blocks, some of the data are synthetic to maintain confidentiality of the worker. However, for larger regions mapped at the county level, the commuteshed and laborshed data are fairly reasonable. OTM includes jobs for a worker employed in the reference as well as previous quarter. Hence, job counts are based on two consecutive quarters (six months) measured at the “beginning of a quarter.” OTM data can differ from commuting patterns developed from state annual income tax returns, which asks a question about “county of residence” and “county of work” on January 1 of the tax- year. OTM can also differ from American Community Survey data, which is based on a sample survey of the resident population. SAIPE (Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates): SAIPE is a U.S. Census Bureau program that provides annual data estimates of income and poverty statistics at various geographic levels. The estimates are used in the administration of federal and state assistance programs. SAIPE utilizes statistical models to estimate data from sample surveys, census enumerations, and administrative records.
  37. 37. 37 Report Contributors This report was prepared by the Purdue Center for Regional Development in partnership with Purdue University Extension. Data Analysis Indraneel Kumar, Ph.D. Ayoung Kim Report Authors Elizabeth Dobis Bo Beaulieu, Ph.D. Report Design Tyler Wright It is the policy of the Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service that all persons have equal opportunity and access to its educational programs, services, activities, and facilities without regard to race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or ancestry, marital status, parental status, sexual orientation, disability or status as a veteran. Purdue University is an Affirmative Action institution. This material may be available in alternative formats.
  38. 38. FOR MORE INFORMATION Purdue Center for Regional Development (PCRD) . . . seeks to pioneer new ideas and strategies that contribute to regional collaboration, innovation and prosperity. Purdue Extension Community Development (CD) . . . works to strengthen the capacity of local leaders, residents and organizations to work together to develop and sustain strong, vibrant communities. Please contact Roberta Crabtree County Extension Director and Community Development Educator 765-474-793 rcrabtree@purdue.edu OR

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