Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Education across space and time (Sir John Daniel)

Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Loading in …3
×

Check these out next

1 of 120 Ad

Education across space and time (Sir John Daniel)

Download to read offline

From St. Paul’s letters to the 1st century churches to today’s Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), education has always fought the constraints of space and time. This review of the 2000-year evolution of distance education examines the changes in pedagogy, organisation and technology that have created contemporary open, distance and eLearning. How will the multiplication of open educational resources influence the next generation of education across space and time? Do MOOCs imply that education can now be fully automated? As the processes of teaching and learning are unbundled, will students look to a variety of specialist organisations for services? Is the traditional business model of higher education on the verge of collapse?

From St. Paul’s letters to the 1st century churches to today’s Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), education has always fought the constraints of space and time. This review of the 2000-year evolution of distance education examines the changes in pedagogy, organisation and technology that have created contemporary open, distance and eLearning. How will the multiplication of open educational resources influence the next generation of education across space and time? Do MOOCs imply that education can now be fully automated? As the processes of teaching and learning are unbundled, will students look to a variety of specialist organisations for services? Is the traditional business model of higher education on the verge of collapse?

Advertisement
Advertisement

More Related Content

Viewers also liked (20)

Similar to Education across space and time (Sir John Daniel) (20)

Advertisement

Education across space and time (Sir John Daniel)

  1. 1. ACU Congress, Perth
  2. 2. 3-month internship 1972 The Open University – Walton Hall
  3. 3. Sir John Daniel
  4. 4. God as a Trinity
  5. 5. The Iron Triangle QU SS AL CE ITY AC COST
  6. 6. DISTANCE LEARNING student a three-legged stool
  7. 7. The Central Challenge • ACCESS (wider) • QUALITY (higher) • COST (lower)
  8. 8. The Iron Triangle QU SS AL CE ITY AC COST
  9. 9. ACCESS QUALITY COST
  10. 10. The Iron Triangle CE SS AC T Y ALI U Q COST
  11. 11. The Iron Triangle QU S ES AL ITY C AC COST
  12. 12. The Iron Triangle QU SS CE ALI AC TY COST
  13. 13. “an insidious link between quality and exclusivity” QU SS AL CE ITY AC COST
  14. 14. ACCESS QUALITY COST
  15. 15. The Technology Revolution • ACCESS (wider) • QUALITY (higher) • COST (lower) ALL AT THE SAME TIME!
  16. 16. DISTANCE LEARNING student a three-legged stool
  17. 17. DISTANCE LEARNING student mat er ials a three-legged stool
  18. 18. DISTANCE LEARNING student mat port er sup a three-legged stool ials
  19. 19. DISTANCE LEARNING student mat port logistics er sup a three-legged stool ials
  20. 20. St. Paul’s letters to young churches
  21. 21. Church Antioch
  22. 22. Lions
  23. 23. St. Paul’s Cathedral, London
  24. 24. Independence and Interaction: Getting the Mixture Right J.S.Daniel & C.Marquis Teaching at a Distance Vol 14: pp. 29-44
  25. 25. DISTANCE LEARNING student mat er ials a three-legged stool
  26. 26. DISTANCE LEARNING student mat port logistics er sup a three-legged stool ials
  27. 27. Railways
  28. 28. Postal systems
  29. 29. Printing & Post = Correspondence education
  30. 30. The Blackboard from 1850
  31. 31. DISTANCE LEARNING student mat port logistics er sup a three-legged stool ials
  32. 32. ‘a guided didactic conversation’ NEW DELHI ‘the best teaching I ever had’
  33. 33. Borje Holmberg Otto Peters
  34. 34. Radio Television Film Computer
  35. 35. The MOTION PICTURE is the most revolutionary instrument introduced into education since the printing press Hoban 1940
  36. 36. PROGRAMMED LEARNING is the first major technological innovation since the invention of printing Woefle 1962
  37. 37. The impact of COMPUTERS on society, and hence on education, has been compared to that of moveable type and the printing press since Gutenberg Caffrey and Mossman 1967
  38. 38. There is no magic educational medium (and never will be)
  39. 39. Lord Geoffrey Crowther Inauguration of the Open University 1969
  40. 40. “The world is caught in a communications revolution, the effects of which will go beyond those of the industrial revolution of two centuries ago. Then the great advance was the invention of machines to multiply the potency of men's muscles. Now the great new advance is the invention of machines to multiply the potency of men's minds. As the steam engine was to the first revolution, so the computer is to the second.” Lord Geoffrey Crowther, 1969
  41. 41. Open as to: • People • Places • Methods • Ideas
  42. 42. • Technology • Pedagogy • Ideology
  43. 43. 1970s 2010s
  44. 44. 1970s 2010s
  45. 45. The Open University has institutionalised Lord Walter Perry innovation Founding Vice-Chancellor The Open University
  46. 46. If you innovate in too many ways at once Lord Walter Perry you will scare Founding Vice-Chancellor The Open University students away!
  47. 47. • Technology • Pedagogy • Ideology
  48. 48. a teaching and learning system
  49. 49. Jessica Mitford ‘Let us now appraise famous authors’ Atlantic Monthly 1970
  50. 50. The University of New England Armidale
  51. 51. Harold Wilson ‘The University of the Air’
  52. 52. Open as to: • People • Places • Methods • Ideas
  53. 53. Church Antioch
  54. 54. Open as to: • People • Places
  55. 55. open education Open and Distance Learning distance learning
  56. 56. ‘My Degree – My Way’
  57. 57. University of London External System The People’s University
  58. 58. Professor Tony Bates “2011 Outlook for Online Learning and Distance Education” (www.contactnorth.ca)
  59. 59. Better to work in teams!
  60. 60. THE TREND TOWARDS OPENNESS - Open Source Software - Open Access to Research - Open Educational Resources
  61. 61. UNESCO HQ Paris 2002 Forum on the Impact of Open CourseWare for Higher Education in Developing Countries
  62. 62. OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES (OER) educational materials that may be freely accessed, reused, modified and shared.
  63. 63. World Congress on Open Educational Resources Paris – June 20-22 – 2012 The Paris Declaration
  64. 64. Paris Declaration on OER 10. Encourage open licensing of educational material produced with public funds.
  65. 65. VANCOUVER - British Columbia is set to become the first province in Canada to offer students free online, open textbooks for the 40 most popular post-secondary courses
  66. 66. Fostering Governmental Support for Open Educational Resources Internationally
  67. 67. Making Sense of MOOCs: Musings in a Maze of Myth, Paradox and Possibility
  68. 68. Course x6002 Circuits and Electronics 155,000 registrations 23,000 tried first test 9,000 passed mid-term 7157 passed = < 5%
  69. 69. Anant Agrawal Exam = ‘very hard’ Attrition high but “if you look at the number in absolute terms, it’s as many as might take the course in 40 years at MIT”
  70. 70. 2 million registrations 33 partner institutions 200 courses
  71. 71. Very high drop out rates in all MOOCs
  72. 72. ‘some classes were so rife with plagiarism that professors have had to plead with their students to stop plagiarizing’ (Students mark each others’ work)
  73. 73. Possibility Myth Paradox The MOOC Maze
  74. 74. Myths and Paradoxes Quality •MYTH: Brand = Quality •HIGH DROP OUT IS NOT QUALITY
  75. 75. These universities used to have scarcity at the heart of their business model
  76. 76. Myths and Paradoxes Certification SUCCEED = CERTIFICATE ADMISSION = DEGREE
  77. 77. Good little piggies in make good bacon out! Dan Coldeway
  78. 78. James Taylor The OER university concept. Adapted from Taylor (2007)
  79. 79. ‘it seems pretty obvious that no one who had any working knowledge of research in pedagogy was deeply involved in the creation of the course’
  80. 80. Tony Bates ‘ ‘an old and out-dated behaviourist pedagogy, relying primarily on information transmission, computer- marked assignments and peer assessment’.
  81. 81. Myths and Paradoxes Why MOOCs? PARADOX: BE OPEN but MAKE MONEY
  82. 82. Possibility Myth Paradox The MOOC Maze
  83. 83. Rankings of MOOCs
  84. 84. ‘to pay more than lip service to importance of teaching and put it at the core their missions. This is the real revolution of MOOCs.’
  85. 85. An unsustainable paradox! For some learners: Open and Free For others: Closed and Expensive
  86. 86. What new Business Model?
  87. 87. Independence and Interaction: Getting the Mixture Right
  88. 88. ACCESS QUALITY COST
  89. 89. “an insidious link between quality and exclusivity” QU SS AL CE ITY AC COST
  90. 90. DISTANCE LEARNING student mat port logistics er sup a three-legged stool ials
  91. 91. Thank you Sir John Daniel
  92. 92. THANK YOU For text and slides: www.sirjohn.ca

×