Michael C. Munger
Duke University
Some General Principles
of Course Design
What Should You Teach?
“Teaching, to be effective, must be, in fact as well
as in spirit, a friendly, cooperative endeavor...
So, start with exchange
 Voluntary? Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics
 Voluntary? Locke, "Venditio"
 Why does it matter if ...
Division of Labor: Plato, Republic, Book II
(Socrates) Justice, which is the subject of our enquiry, is, sometimes
spoken ...
John Locke, "Venditio", 1661
 Merchant has two ships in Danzig, full of corn
(wheat).
 Ostende: normal conditions, 5 shi...
Eugen Bohm Bawerk
Positive Theory of Capital, Book IV, Chapter 2, 1888
A peasant, whom we shall call A, requires a horse.
...
Euvoluntary Exchange
For economics, political science, and
philosophy, the way to build connections about
things "we" all ...
An Example: They Clapped
Fran at Landfall: (11 pm 9-5-96)
Yahoos
They had the technology,
they had the tools….
Dots: Location Choices
by Yahoo-Entrepreneurs
Guess Who Showed Up? Why?
Anti-gouging law…..
North Carolina's Anti-Gouging Law in 1996
(General Statutes 75-36)
(a) It shall be a violation of G.S....
Anti-gouging law…..
North Carolina's Anti-Gouging Law in 1996
(General Statutes 75-36)
(a) It shall be a violation of G.S....
Anti-gouging law…..
North Carolina's Anti-Gouging Law in 1996
(General Statutes 75-36)
(a) It shall be a violation of G.S....
Anti-gouging law…..
North Carolina's Anti-Gouging Law in 1996
(General Statutes 75-36)
(a) It shall be a violation of G.S....
Question: What did the people
standing in line do?
 They clapped. Appeared to be happy.
 What is the objection?
 Why do...
 Matt Zwolinski Learn Liberty Video:
http://youtu.be/h9QEkw6_O6w
But then HOW to design a course?
 I would suggest you think strategically
 Maximize, subject to constraints
 And think ...
Maximize, Subject to Constraints
 Interesting to you, on the merits
 Interesting to you, in terms of research content
 ...
Maximize, Subject to Constraints
 Interesting to you, on the merits
 Interesting to you, in terms of research content
 ...
Maximize, Subject to Constraints
 Interesting to you, on the merits
 Interesting to you, in terms of research content
 ...
Maximize, Subject to Constraints
 Interesting to you, on the merits
 Interesting to you, in terms of research content
 ...
Overall, for a New Faculty Member:
Plan to Win, Plan Not to Lose
Win: I'm on a team, playing my
position, which is to offe...
INITIAL DESIGN PHASE
Build Strong Primary Components
 Step 1. Identify important situational factors
 Step 2. Identify i...
INTERMEDIATE DESIGN PHASE--
Assemble Components into a
Coherent Whole
 Step 6. Create a thematic structure for the course...
FINAL DESIGN PHASE
Finish Important Remaining Tasks
 Step 9. Develop the grading system
 Step 10. De-Bug possible proble...
Instrumental Intermezzo….
Michael C. Munger
Duke University
Adapted from B. Gross, “The Comprehensive
Syllabus,” in Tools for Teaching, Jossey-
Bass...
Chair at Duke for 10 years
 35 faculty
 6 people denied tenure, 10 new orientations
 Completely revision of curriculum
...
Outline of Syllabus
 Basic Information
 Course Description
 Materials Needed
 Requirements
 Policies
 Schedule (virt...
Basic Information
 name of university, semester, year
 course title, number, unit value, meeting times, location
 instr...
Course Description
Prerequisites:
 – prior courses
 – knowledge/skills (needed to succeed in this course)
 – permission...
Materials Needed
Primary or required books/readings for the course
 – author, title, edition, ISBN
 – availability of el...
Requirements
exams and quizzes
 – how many
 – what kind (e.g., open/closed book; essay/multiple choice)
 – type of know...
Policies
grading procedures
 – describe how students will be graded: on a curve or absolute scale?
 – clarify weighting ...
Schedule
tentative calendar of topics and readings
 – by week rather than by session
 – or leave some sessions empty "re...
Resources
– time management suggestions/resources
– tips for studying, taking notes, preparing for exams
– common student ...
Accommodation / Evaluation
Accommodation
 a request that students see the instructor to discuss
accommodations for:
 – p...
Rights and Disclaimers
Rights and Rules of Engagement
 statement of students’ and instructor’s rights
to academic freedom...
Ihs syllabus june 2013shrter
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Ihs syllabus june 2013shrter

240 views

Published on

Presentation on Course and Syllabus Design, with Examples

Published in: Education, Business
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Ihs syllabus june 2013shrter

  1. 1. Michael C. Munger Duke University Some General Principles of Course Design
  2. 2. What Should You Teach? “Teaching, to be effective, must be, in fact as well as in spirit, a friendly, cooperative endeavor and not a battle between antagonists. This requires much time, patience, and sincere sympathy for honest differences of opinion." - Baldy Harper” History of Thought? (Economist's name…) Pick a spine, to organize it. Voluntary exchange…
  3. 3. So, start with exchange  Voluntary? Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics  Voluntary? Locke, "Venditio"  Why does it matter if its voluntary? What does it mean if the exchange is voluntary? (I made up a word: "euvoluntary.") Advantage: Foundational. And it let's you express a view that all your colleagues will agree is truly important.
  4. 4. Division of Labor: Plato, Republic, Book II (Socrates) Justice, which is the subject of our enquiry, is, sometimes spoken of as the virtue of an individual, and sometimes as the virtue of a State. …A State, I said, arises, as I conceive, out of the needs of mankind; no one is self-sufficing, but all of us have many wants. Can any other origin of a State be imagined? (Adeimantus) There can I be no other. (Socrates) Then, as we have many wants, and many persons are needed to supply them, one takes a helper for one purpose and another for another; and when these partners and helpers are gathered together in one habitation the body of inhabitants is termed a State. (Adeimantus) True. And they exchange with one another, and one gives, and another receives….that the exchange will be for their good. (THREE A's: Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas)
  5. 5. John Locke, "Venditio", 1661  Merchant has two ships in Danzig, full of corn (wheat).  Ostende: normal conditions, 5 shillings per bushel  Dunkirk: near famine, 20 shillings per bushel  What should he do?  Generally, when is the market price the just price? An amazingly modern view of market price  (Remarkably, gives account of secondary markets, and concludes the just thing to do is send the ships to Dunkirk and sell at the market price THERE.)
  6. 6. Eugen Bohm Bawerk Positive Theory of Capital, Book IV, Chapter 2, 1888 A peasant, whom we shall call A, requires a horse. His individual circumstances are such that he attaches the same value to the possession of the horse as he does to the possession of £30. A neighbour, whom we shall call B, has a horse for sale. If B's circumstances also are such that he considers the possession of the horse worth as much as, or worth more than £30, there can, as we saw, be no exchange between them. Suppose, however, that B values his horse at considerably less, say at £10. What will happen?
  7. 7. Euvoluntary Exchange For economics, political science, and philosophy, the way to build connections about things "we" all "agree" about is consent, or voluntary exchange (what I have called "euvoluntary exchange") "Euvoluntary or Not, Exchange is Just," Social Philosophy and Policy, 2011. No externalities, no coercion, and all parties to exchange have (a) acceptable BATNAs, and (b) no great disparity in BATNAs
  8. 8. An Example: They Clapped Fran at Landfall: (11 pm 9-5-96)
  9. 9. Yahoos
  10. 10. They had the technology, they had the tools….
  11. 11. Dots: Location Choices by Yahoo-Entrepreneurs
  12. 12. Guess Who Showed Up? Why?
  13. 13. Anti-gouging law….. North Carolina's Anti-Gouging Law in 1996 (General Statutes 75-36) (a) It shall be a violation of G.S. 75-1.1 for any person to sell or rent or offer to sell or rent at retail during a state of disaster, in the area for which the state of disaster has been declared, any merchandise or services which are consumed or used as a direct result of an emergency or which are consumed or used to preserve, protect, or sustain life, health, safety, or comfort of persons or their property with the knowledge and intent to charge a price that is unreasonably excessive under the circumstances. (Later amended to be even more restrictive, outlawing price changes reflecting cost increases up the supply chain, August 2006, SL2006-245, GS 75-38).
  14. 14. Anti-gouging law….. North Carolina's Anti-Gouging Law in 1996 (General Statutes 75-36) (a) It shall be a violation of G.S. 75-1.1 for any person to sell or rent or offer to sell or rent at retail during a state of disaster, in the area for which the state of disaster has been declared, any merchandise or services which are consumed or used as a direct result of an emergency or which are consumed or used to preserve, protect, or sustain life, health, safety, or comfort of persons or their property with the knowledge and intent to charge a price that is unreasonably excessive under the circumstances. (Later amended to be even more restrictive, outlawing price changes reflecting cost increases up the supply chain, August 2006, SL2006-245, GS 75-38).
  15. 15. Anti-gouging law….. North Carolina's Anti-Gouging Law in 1996 (General Statutes 75-36) (a) It shall be a violation of G.S. 75-1.1 for any person to sell or rent or offer to sell or rent at retail during a state of disaster, in the area for which the state of disaster has been declared, any merchandise or services which are consumed or used as a direct result of an emergency or which are consumed or used to preserve, protect, or sustain life, health, safety, or comfort of persons or their property with the knowledge and intent to charge a price that is unreasonably excessive under the circumstances. (Later amended to be even more restrictive, outlawing price changes reflecting cost increases up the supply chain, August 2006, SL2006-245, GS 75-38).
  16. 16. Anti-gouging law….. North Carolina's Anti-Gouging Law in 1996 (General Statutes 75-36) (a) It shall be a violation of G.S. 75-1.1 for any person to sell or rent or offer to sell or rent at retail during a state of disaster, in the area for which the state of disaster has been declared, any merchandise or services which are consumed or used as a direct result of an emergency or which are consumed or used to preserve, protect, or sustain life, health, safety, or comfort of persons or their property with the knowledge and intent to charge a price that is unreasonably excessive under the circumstances. (Later amended to be even more restrictive, outlawing price changes reflecting cost increases up the supply chain, August 2006, SL2006-245, GS 75-38).
  17. 17. Question: What did the people standing in line do?  They clapped. Appeared to be happy.  What is the objection?  Why do so many states have these laws? Because people object to exchange that is not euvoluntary!  How do economists "solve" this problem? By assuming perfect competition, which by definition has many sellers and many buyers of a homogeneous product.  Completely different from EBB's conception, different from any idea of markets. Economics tries hard to ignore markets. Problematize competition.  Anti-gouging laws are NOT irrational.
  18. 18.  Matt Zwolinski Learn Liberty Video: http://youtu.be/h9QEkw6_O6w
  19. 19. But then HOW to design a course?  I would suggest you think strategically  Maximize, subject to constraints  And think hard. Take two steps back…
  20. 20. Maximize, Subject to Constraints  Interesting to you, on the merits  Interesting to you, in terms of research content  Useful, important ideas  Attract enrollments  Fit into offerings in the department/school  Consistent with your own intellectual integrity  Do not violate the norms of the department (not what you think should be the norms; find out!)
  21. 21. Maximize, Subject to Constraints  Interesting to you, on the merits  Interesting to you, in terms of research content  Useful, important ideas  Attract enrollments  Fit into offerings in the department/school  Consistent with your own intellectual integrity  Do not violate the norms of the department (not what you think should be the norms; find out!) This version is dangerous. All the objectives are about you, or your judgments
  22. 22. Maximize, Subject to Constraints  Interesting to you, on the merits  Interesting to you, in terms of research content  Useful, important ideas  Attract enrollments  Fit into offerings in the department/school  Consistent with your own intellectual integrity  Do not violate the norms of the department (not what you think should be the norms; find out!) This version is sensible. It is the way a new person should start out. Don't give up your interests, or principles
  23. 23. Maximize, Subject to Constraints  Interesting to you, on the merits  Interesting to you, in terms of research content  Useful, important ideas  Attract enrollments  Fit into offerings in the department/school  Consistent with your own intellectual integrity  Do not violate the norms of the department (not what you think should be the norms; find out!) After you get tenure…
  24. 24. Overall, for a New Faculty Member: Plan to Win, Plan Not to Lose Win: I'm on a team, playing my position, which is to offer a particular, interesting perspective Lose: I'm the lone teller of truth, and this class is my only chance to save students from falsehood and embarrass my colleagues
  25. 25. INITIAL DESIGN PHASE Build Strong Primary Components  Step 1. Identify important situational factors  Step 2. Identify important learning goals  Step 3. Formulate appropriate feedback and assessment procedures  Step 4. Select effective teaching/learning activities  Step 5. Make sure the primary components are integrated Adapted source for this and the next two slides is http://www.niu.edu/facdev/programs/handouts/icd/selfdirectedguide.pdf , L. Dee Fink
  26. 26. INTERMEDIATE DESIGN PHASE-- Assemble Components into a Coherent Whole  Step 6. Create a thematic structure for the course  Step 7. Select or create an instructional strategy May want to include ONE innovation: A. Flipped classroom B. Virtual sections (constraints: lecture, # teaching assistants, # of section break-out rooms) C. Experiments, Think-Pair-Share  Step 8. Integrate the course structure and the instructional strategy to create an overall scheme of learning activities
  27. 27. FINAL DESIGN PHASE Finish Important Remaining Tasks  Step 9. Develop the grading system  Step 10. De-Bug possible problems  Step 11. Write the course syllabus  Step 12. Plan an evaluation of the course and of your teaching, for assessment  ALWAYS give an informal anonymous midterm evaluation
  28. 28. Instrumental Intermezzo….
  29. 29. Michael C. Munger Duke University Adapted from B. Gross, “The Comprehensive Syllabus,” in Tools for Teaching, Jossey- Bass, 2006 The Syllabus: Nuts, and Bolts
  30. 30. Chair at Duke for 10 years  35 faculty  6 people denied tenure, 10 new orientations  Completely revision of curriculum  In almost every case, the legal problems I had were the result of problems with a syllabus.  One note: J.S. Taylor made two extraordinarily valuable points 1. DO NOT COVER THE SYLLABUS in the first class. 1 page handout, basics of readings and grades. Second class you can talk about the syllabus, or use emails a little at a time. 2. PLAN A MIDTERM EVALUATION. And you may want to talk to the evaluation people at the outset, to get a baseline.
  31. 31. Outline of Syllabus  Basic Information  Course Description  Materials Needed  Requirements  Policies  Schedule (virtual sections, when class?)  Resources  Accomodation/Evaluation Why think about all this? Because it makes you intentional. Less important as the course develops in your mind, with experience. Crucial if you are doing it for the first time
  32. 32. Basic Information  name of university, semester, year  course title, number, unit value, meeting times, location  instructor, TA names  how to contact instructor/TAs:  – in-person office hours, times/location (with map); drop-in or by appointment?  – online office hours, times and how to access (URL)  – email addresses  – phone numbers (private office and department lines)  – times available other than office hours  – home or cell phone number and limits on its use  Instructor web page URL and twitter handle  Course web page URL  Course Facebook page  Description of course software (SAKAI, Blackboard, etc)
  33. 33. Course Description Prerequisites:  – prior courses  – knowledge/skills (needed to succeed in this course)  – permission of instructor needed? Overview of course  – what is the course about: its purpose, rationale?  – what are the general topics or focus?  – how does it fit with other courses in the department or on campus?  – who is the course aimed at?  – why would students want to take this course and learn this material? Student learning objectives (assessment)  – what will students be expected to know or do after this course?  – what competencies/skills/knowledge will students be expected to demonstrate at the end of the course? Methods of instruction and Why  – lectures  – discussion  – group work
  34. 34. Materials Needed Primary or required books/readings for the course  – author, title, edition, ISBN  – availability of electronic or alternative formats, for students with disabilities  -- supplemental or optional books/readings  -- websites and links Other materials  – laptop/tablet/clicker rental  – software
  35. 35. Requirements exams and quizzes  – how many  – what kind (e.g., open/closed book; essay/multiple choice)  – type of knowledge and abilities tested  – place, date and time of midterm and final exam assignments/problem sets/projects/reports/research papers  – provide general information on type, length, and when due (detailed information can be distributed during the term)  – clarify the relationship between the learning objectives and assignments  – identify criteria for assessing student work  – indicate whether students submit their work online or in hard copy format for research papers and projects:  introduce students to the steps in conducting research  create shorter assignments that build to the research paper (e.g. annotated bibliography of primary sources, thesis statement, fact sheet, etc.)  specify the skills and knowledge students need to complete the research assignments connect research assignments to course goals and student learning objectives
  36. 36. Policies grading procedures  – describe how students will be graded: on a curve or absolute scale?  – clarify weighting of course components  – explain policies regarding incompletes, pass/not pass  – describe grade appeals attendance and tardiness class participation: rules of engagement classroom decorum  – no eating  -- laptops? Prohibited? Required?  – no reading newspapers  – turn off cell phones interrupted exams (e.g., fire alarms) missed exams/make up exams missed assignments, late assignments/extensions illness and family emergencies extra credit opportunities permissible and impermissible collaboration standards for academic honesty and penalties for infractions (University URL)
  37. 37. Schedule tentative calendar of topics and readings  – by week rather than by session  – or leave some sessions empty "review" for flexibility firm dates for exams and written assignments dates of special events  – field trips  – outside talks last day to withdraw from the course
  38. 38. Resources – time management suggestions/resources – tips for studying, taking notes, preparing for exams – common student mistakes or misconceptions -- copies of past exams or model student papers: policy, archive -- glossaries of technical terms (St Ency Phil) -- links to appropriate support material on the web (style manuals, past student projects, web based resources, etc.) -- academic/ psychological support services on campus -- Plagiarism policy, citing practices -- information on the availability of videotapes or webcasts of lectures -- space for students to identify two or three classmates’ names and their contact information -- Reduce transactions cost of forming a study group -- Safety procedures/Emergency procedure 1. Active shooter 2. Storm/weather 3. Fire/emergency
  39. 39. Accommodation / Evaluation Accommodation  a request that students see the instructor to discuss accommodations for:  – physical disabilities  – medical disabilities  – learning disabilities  a statement on reasonable accommodation for students’ religious beliefs, observations, and practices  Evaluation/Assessment  student feedback strategies during the semester (other than quizzes and tests)  end-of-course evaluation procedures
  40. 40. Rights and Disclaimers Rights and Rules of Engagement  statement of students’ and instructor’s rights to academic freedom (e.g., respect the rights of others to express their points of view)  General rules of engagement  statement on copyright protection for the contents of the course, as appropriate Disclaimer  syllabus/schedule subject to change  acknowledge faculty, if any, whose syllabi or assignments you have used to create this course

×