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Design Toolkit Analysis

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The visual analysis of 10 popular/ successful Design Toolkits. 4 Graduate Service Design Students from SCAD (Lauren Peters, Lindsay Vetel, Louis Finklestein, and Richard Ekelman) explore the contextual value of these Design Toolkits and Whom they are created for.
.....................
Contextualizing, analyzing, and quantifying each
toolkit, gave us a new and deeper understanding of
each.

Which also posed the question, are designers too
intimidated to write for other designers?

Or were these toolkits written in order to expand the
notion of design thinking to users who wouldn’t
normally employ these philosophies and to bring a
deeper understanding to outliers?

Published in: Design, Technology, Business
  • Hello Louis! Thanks for the great analysis! I am doing something similar in my master's thesis and was wondering if you could share what you used as a reference for the bi-polar opposites and segmentation grid v.1 and how you give values in the rating system (in the segmentation grid) Would be extremely happy if I would get some feedback. Best, Irena
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  • Hey Lou, only some of these are Service Design toolkits, maybe we should call this presentation something more accurate: Design toolkit analysis?
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Design Toolkit Analysis

  1. 1. Toolkit Analysis SERV 753 / Assignment One Rich Ekelman Lou Fink Lauren Peters Lindsay Vetell
  2. 2. Blue Ocean Strategy Human Centered Design Gamestorming Design For Intent 101 Design Methods Business Model Generation This Is Service Design Thinking Design For Growth ServiceDesignTools.Org Double Diamond Review and analyze ten toolkits for design thinkers & service designers: Toolkits:
  3. 3. Initial Group Discussion • Who uses these toolkits? • What are the factors of a successful toolkit? • What was the author’s intended use for each?
  4. 4. BO HCD GS DI DM BMG SDT DG TSD DD Toolkit Bi-Polar Opposites Intended Use Toolkit Outcome Simple Convergent Complex Divergent Creating Collecting Linear Thinking Lateral Thinking Novice User Expert User Passive Active Optimization Transformation Innovation Incremental change Business Context Community Context
  5. 5. Segmentation Grid v.1 How does each tool influence the entirety of its Toolkit? Rating System 0-3 / 0 - No influence, 1 - Minimal Influence, 2 - Medium Influence, 3 - High Influence
  6. 6. BO HCD GS DI DM BMG SDT DG TSD DD Spider Diagrams v.1 Creative Consultancies Business Corps Government Agencies LaymenResearchers Non-Profit Organization Creative Consultancies Business Corps Government Agencies LaymenResearchers Non-Profit Organization Creative Consultancies Business Corps Government Agencies LaymenResearchers Non-Profit Organization Creative Consultancies Business Corps Government Agencies LaymenResearchers Non-Profit Organization Creative Consultancies Business Corps Government Agencies LaymenResearchers Non-Profit Organization Creative Consultancies Business Corps Government Agencies LaymenResearchers Non-Profit Organization Creative Consultancies Business Corps Government Agencies LaymenResearchers Non-Profit Organization Creative Consultancies Business Corps Government Agencies LaymenResearchers Non-Profit Organization Creative Consultancies Business Corps Government Agencies LaymenResearchers Non-Profit Organization Creative Consultancies Business Corps Government Agencies LaymenResearchers Non-Profit Organization Who is the toolkit’s intended audience?
  7. 7. BO HCD GS DI DM BMG SDT DG TSD DD 2x2 Matrices What to expect beforehand: What to expect while using:
  8. 8. BO HCD GS DI DM BMG SDT DG TSD DD Spider Diagrams v.2 Creative agency client Business Creative agency client Business Project tools tools tools Research Mapping DGHCD DIBMG DM SDT TSD GS DD BO Strategist Project Manager Design Lead Analyst Operations Manager Project Manager Strategist Project Manager Design Lead Analyst Operations Manager Project Manager Strategist Project Manager Design Lead Analyst Operations Manager Project Manager Strategist Project Manager Design Lead Analyst Operations Manager Project Manager
  9. 9. Segmentation Grid v.2 Toolkits Contain 12Types of Tools Observational Research Generative Research Attitudinal Research Storytelling Vizualization & Mapping Reframing Metric & Evaluation Team Building & Project Management Future Envisioning/ Trend Synthesis/ Convergence Implementation 98 Total Tools101 design methods Game storming Double Diamond This is Service Design Business Model Generation Design For Intent Human Centered Design Service Design Tools Blue Ocean Design For Growth 7% 5% 9% 5% 22% 4% 6% 3% 7% 6% 14% 12% Prototyping & Testing 44 Total Tools 2% 11% 9% 16% 7% 14% 0% 11% 12% 9% 0% 9% 56 Total Tools 7% 7% 4% 27% 20% 2% 0% 0% 21% 4% 5% 36% 23 Total Tools 13% 13% 4% 13% 13% 9% 4% 13% 4% 0% 4% 9% 34 Total Tools 21% 8% 12% 8% 21% 9% 0% 6% 9% 6% 0% 0% 16 Total Tools 6% 6% 6% 0% 13% 6% 19% 6% 19% 0% 19% 0% 102 Total Tools 25% 2% 3% 3% 1% 0% 5% 0% 60% 3% 0% 0% 88 Total Tools 0% 11% 2% 2% 16% 17% 4% 27% 2% 6% 5% 8% 54 Total Tools 5% 2% 21% 7% 13% 9% 4% 0% 7% 2% 6% 24% 15 Total Tools 0% 27% 0% 0% 2% 27% 7% 13% 0% 7% 0% 0% Toolkits contained 12 columns of categorized tools.
  10. 10. Toolkit Pros & Cons ConsPros Human Centered Design Good tools for building empathy, context and understanding. Easy to understand visualization tools. Focused implementing a design. Lacks project management tools Does not offer a means of measuring trends that could effect their design in the future. Lacks the ability to be generative in it's research. ConsPros Design For Intent Vast amounts of conditional test methods. Accounts for ways to discreetly test which factors make the greatest impact in a user's experience. Lacks a larger structure from which to build off of observations & conditional tests. Many tools are too open to interpretation. ConsPros Service Design Tools.Org Many accessible ways to tell visual stories. Great visualization tools for all levels of design. Offers many tools for Hi to Lo-Fi Prototyping. No overarching structure. Lacks the ability to manage a process. Does not offer metrics for evaluation. ConsPros Blue Ocean Strategy Excellent for discovering new business opportunities and reframing existing businesses, products, and processes. Good project management tools. Does not offer a means to prototype and test concepts. Lacks a means to implement a radical new innovation. ConsPros Design For Growth Builds understanding and context that informs the design process. Provides many ways to to visualize iterative concepts. Provides Project Management tools. Lacks a means of recognizing and analyzing trends. Is a very linear process that requires step by step developments. ConsPros 101 Design Methods Provides easy to understand tools for visualization and mapping process and insights. Offers many tools for synthesizing solutions via analyzing research insights. Lacks a method for transformative reframing. Offers a great deal of tools, but does not suggest an overarching system in which to use them. ConsPros Gamestorming Strong methods for teambuilding Offers many tools that allow a business audience to work differently as a creative team. Lacks contextual research tools. Prototyping and testing methods are minimal. ConsPros Double Diamond Strong project management abilities. Creates very defined stages with ability to remove the "Fuzzy" front end of design. Accessible. Lacks the ability to account for trends. Does not demonstrate a means for implementatio n or storytelling. ConsPros TISDT Offers a wide array of tools. Great as a reference book. Provides many techniques for observational research. Does not offer an over arching methodology. Lacks metrics for process evaluation. Does not criticize or praise any tools offered. ConsPros Business Model Generation Very adaptive toolkit that offers many ways to innovate from trends, generative research, and reframing a problem. Able to breakdown a very complex organization. Completely lacks a metric for concept evaluation.
  11. 11. Reflection • By trial and error, we were able to determine the best methods of analyzing the toolkits. • Understanding the toolkit in context changed the meaning and values of each. • Surprisingly, several toolkits were not created for a designer audience. • We are now able to view each toolkit objectively and realize the macro to micro uses.
  12. 12. Thank You SERV 753 / Assignment One Rich Ekelman Lou Fink Lauren Peters Lindsay Vetell
  13. 13. Service Design Toolkits | Poster Breakdown
  14. 14. BLUE OCEAN IDEO HCD GAME STORMING DESIGN FOR INTENT 101 DESIGN METHODS BUSINESS MODEL GENERATION SERVICE DESIGN TOOLS DESIGN FOR GROWTH THIS IS SERVICE DESIGN THINKING DOUBLE DIAMOND
  15. 15. Toolkits Contain 12Types of Tools Observational Research Generative Research Attitudinal Research Storytelling Vizualization & Mapping Reframing Metric & Evaluation Team Building & Project Management Future Envisioning/ Trend Synthesis/ Convergence Implementation 98 Total Tools101 design methods Game storming Double Diamond This is Service Design Business Model Generation Design For Intent Human Centered Design Service Design Tools Blue Ocean Design For Growth 7% 5% 9% 5% 22% 4% 6% 3% 7% 6% 14% 12% Prototyping & Testing 44 Total Tools 2% 11% 9% 16% 7% 14% 0% 11% 12% 9% 0% 9% 56 Total Tools 7% 7% 4% 27% 20% 2% 0% 0% 21% 4% 5% 36% 23 Total Tools 13% 13% 4% 13% 13% 9% 4% 13% 4% 0% 4% 9% 34 Total Tools 21% 8% 12% 8% 21% 9% 0% 6% 9% 6% 0% 0% 16 Total Tools 6% 6% 6% 0% 13% 6% 19% 6% 19% 0% 19% 0% 102 Total Tools 25% 2% 3% 3% 1% 0% 5% 0% 60% 3% 0% 0% 88 Total Tools 0% 11% 2% 2% 16% 17% 4% 27% 2% 6% 5% 8% 54 Total Tools 5% 2% 21% 7% 13% 9% 4% 0% 7% 2% 6% 24% 15 Total Tools 0% 27% 0% 0% 2% 27% 7% 13% 0% 7% 0% 0%
  16. 16. Observational Research Generative Research Attitudinal Research Storytelling Vizualization & Mapping Reframing Metric & Evaluation 101 design methods Game storming Double Diamond This is Service Design Business Model Generation Design For Intent Human Centered Design Service Design Tools Blue Ocean Design For Growth 7% 5% 9% 5% 22% 4% 6% 2% 11% 9% 16% 7% 14% 0% 7% 7% 4% 27% 20% 2% 0% 13% 13% 4% 13% 13% 9% 4% 21% 8% 12% 8% 21% 9% 0% 6% 6% 6% 0% 13% 6% 19% 25% 2% 3% 3% 1% 0% 5% 0% 11% 2% 2% 16% 17% 4% 5% 2% 21% 7% 13% 9% 4% 0% 27% 0% 0% 2% 27% 7%
  17. 17. Reframing Metric & Evaluation Team Building & Project Management Future Envisioning/ Trend Synthesis/ Convergence Implementation 98 Total Tools 4% 6% 3% 7% 6% 14% 12% Prototyping & Testing 44 Total Tools 14% 0% 11% 12% 9% 0% 9% 56 Total Tools 2% 0% 0% 21% 4% 5% 36% 23 Total Tools 9% 4% 13% 4% 0% 4% 9% 34 Total Tools 9% 0% 6% 9% 6% 0% 0% 16 Total Tools 6% 19% 6% 19% 0% 19% 0% 102 Total Tools 0% 5% 0% 60% 3% 0% 0% 88 Total Tools 17% 4% 27% 2% 6% 5% 8% 54 Total Tools 9% 4% 0% 7% 2% 6% 24% 15 Total Tools 27% 7% 13% 0% 7% 0% 0%
  18. 18. BLUE OCEAN IDEO HCD GAME STORMING DESIGN FOR INTENT 101 DESIGN METHODS BUSINESS MODEL GENERATION SERVICE DESIGN TOOLS DESIGN FOR GROWTH THIS IS SERVICE DESIGN THINKING DOUBLE DIAMOND
  19. 19. BLUE OCEAN IDEO HCD GAME STORMING DESIGN FOR INTENT 101 DESIGN METHODS BUSINESS MODEL GENERATION SERVICE DESIGN TOOLS DESIGN FOR GROWTH THIS IS SERVICE DESIGN THINKING DOUBLE DIAMOND
  20. 20. BLUE OCEAN IDEO HCD GAME STORMING DESIGN FOR INTENT 101 DESIGN METHODS BUSINESS MODEL GENERATION SERVICE DESIGN TOOLS DESIGN FOR GROWTH THIS IS SERVICE DESIGN THINKING DOUBLE DIAMOND Project tools toolstools ResearchMapping Strategist Project Manager Design Lead Analyst Operations Manager Project Manager Strategist Project Manager Design Lead Analyst Operations Manager Project Manager Strategist Project Manager Design Lead Analyst Operations Manager Project Manager Strategist Project Manager Design Lead Analyst Operations Manager Project Manager Creative agency client Business Creative agency client Business
  21. 21. Cheers!
  22. 22. BLUE OCEAN IDEO HCD GAME STORMING DESIGN FOR INTENT 101 DESIGN METHODS BUSINESS MODEL GENERATION SERVICE DESIGN TOOLS DESIGN FOR GROWTH THIS IS SERVICE DESIGN THINKING DOUBLE DIAMOND Service Design Toolkitsserv753 Introduction | Analyzing the Toolkits Despite many of our initial attempts at evaluating the ten toolkits, we actually learned more in our journey than would have been possible had we just quantitatively analyzed them from the get-go. Our first attempt at a segmentation grid proved to be a good fundamen- tal overview in which we examined macro-principles and process. Delving deeper into each toolkit, we were able to uncover the true nature of each; the author’s intended audience, application, and process and set our own biases aside. We summarized each, pulling out guid- ing principles, vernacular, and specific tools in order to drill down the true nature of each kit. These summaries served as the backbone of the rest of our exploration. When first tasked with analyzing these ten toolkits, it became apparent that each of us carried our own assumptions and biases based on previous experiences with each tool. Shortly thereafter, we found ourselves in a semantic debate. On top of identifying our own biases based on previous experiences with the toolkits, we also learned that un- derstanding the toolkit in context drastically changed the meaning and values of each. For instance, none of us were previously aware that Gamestorming was intended for business people, de- spite it explicitly stating so in the introduction. Upon objectively quantifying the tools, we noted that a large portion of Gamestorming tools were based on team building and project management! While designers and students use many of these tools, the intended audience seems to tip more towards the business professional or layman. The verbiage and hand-holding through most of the tools make it easy to understand creative process, and even implement into the readers given context, each suggesting that techniques and tools be applied on a per-situation-basis. Despite the intentions of the authors, these toolkits are still widely utilized by users outside of the intended audience. Because of this, we categorized their actual users into two different types: creatives and clients. Within those brack- ets, we broke them down further into different knowledge levels, from a novice to expert, in order to demonstrate how each toolkit may be better suited for each individual user. An easy way to determine what something is, is to first determine what it isn’t; After a lengthy discussion on our initial perceptions of each toolkit, we whiteboarded imperative characteristics of a successful framework. We then turned the ten most defining components into bipolar opposite continuums in order to plot and compare each toolkit as a whole. As we plotted, parallels and insights started to reveal themselves to us. These 2x2 matrices can help participants decide which toolkits are more appropriate for their needs, environment, and level of experience within their field. The first illustrates the user’s learning-curve combined with the tool’s tendency to require a team member to facilitate the steps in an activity. The second represents what participants can expect while using the different toolkits by mapping the level of engagement and flexibility of each tool. After contextualizing, analyzing, and quantifying each toolkit, gave us a new and deeper understanding of each. Which also posed the question, are designers too intimidated to write for other designers? Or were these toolkits written in order to expand the notion of design thinking to users who wouldn’t normally employ these philosophies and to bring a deeper understanding to outliers? Toolkit Continuums Toolkit 2x2’s Spider Diagrams Toolkit Conclusions After skimming the surface of each toolkit, we further defined each segment down to the specific tool and even the language the author used; finding that sometimes the author was saying the same thing as another source, but had adopted their own jargon. We also used a ranking systemfor each tool in order to es- tablish relevance and influence. This complex segmenta- tion grid while thorough, did not allow us to garner many insights, due to its fragmented nature. Toolkits Contain 12Types of Tools Observational Research Generative Research Attitudinal Research Storytelling Vizualization & Mapping Reframing Metric & Evaluation Team Building & Project Management Future Envisioning/ Trend Synthesis/ Convergence Implementation 98 Total Tools101 design methods Game storming Double Diamond This is Service Design Business Model Generation Design For Intent Human Centered Design Service Design Tools Blue Ocean Design For Growth 7% 5% 9% 5% 22% 4% 6% 3% 7% 6% 14% 12% Prototyping & Testing 44 Total Tools 2% 11% 9% 16% 7% 14% 0% 11% 12% 9% 0% 9% 56 Total Tools 7% 7% 4% 27% 20% 2% 0% 0% 21% 4% 5% 36% 23 Total Tools 13% 13% 4% 13% 13% 9% 4% 13% 4% 0% 4% 9% 34 Total Tools 21% 8% 12% 8% 21% 9% 0% 6% 9% 6% 0% 0% 16 Total Tools 6% 6% 6% 0% 13% 6% 19% 6% 19% 0% 19% 0% 102 Total Tools 25% 2% 3% 3% 1% 0% 5% 0% 60% 3% 0% 0% 88 Total Tools 0% 11% 2% 2% 16% 17% 4% 27% 2% 6% 5% 8% 54 Total Tools 5% 2% 21% 7% 13% 9% 4% 0% 7% 2% 6% 24% 15 Total Tools 0% 27% 0% 0% 2% 27% 7% 13% 0% 7% 0% 0% Project tools toolstools ResearchMapping Strategist Project Manager Design Lead Analyst Operations Manager Project Manager Strategist Project Manager Design Lead Analyst Operations Manager Project Manager Strategist Project Manager Design Lead Analyst Operations Manager Project Manager Strategist Project Manager Design Lead Analyst Operations Manager Project Manager Strategist Project Manager Design Lead Analyst Operations Manager Project Manager Creative agency client Business Strategist Project Manager Design Lead Analyst Operations Manager Project Manager Creative agency client Business The extreme nature of this tool proved to be too qualitative, and consequently too biased to discriminate any concrete differences amongst the toolkits. Although the tools out- come was unsuccessful, it allowed us to learn from our mistakes and value the quantita- tive and unbiased nature of our segmentation grid analysis. Additionally, it spurred much necessary discussion about the deeper meaning of each toolkit, and their role in design thinking. Segmentation Grid It did however serve as a stepping stone to our most suc- cessful analysis! After discovering the overlapping tools, we began to cat- egorize each and every tool based on its inherent values, which turned into our existing twelve categories. This allowed us to pinpoint each toolkits objective nature by noting the percentage of each category in a given toolkit.

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