Lesson 4: Evaluating Sources

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Lesson 4: Evaluating Sources

  1. 1. • When YOU do a Google search, HOW do you decide what results are good? • What would help you be better at evaluating information?
  2. 2. Ability to evaluate ANY type of information source to see if it meets your needs
  3. 3. • Most students consider FORMAT to be THE most important criterion for selecting sources • Joe Student: “INTERNET is best!!!” • “A source should be judged for what it contains, NOT how it is stored or produced” (Quaratiello, 2011, p. 21).
  4. 4. Content Format
  5. 5. “While evaluating the information you find in books and periodicals is important, evaluating web-based material is absolutely crucial” (Quaratiello, 2011, p. 20).
  6. 6. Quality Quantity
  7. 7. Often hard to tell: 1. WHO wrote the info 2. WHO published the info 3. HOW accurate it is 4. WHERE they got their info 5. WHEN it was posted
  8. 8. • Relevance/Credibility Model • CARS Model •CRAAP Test
  9. 9. • Currency • Relevance • Authority • Accuracy • Purpose
  10. 10. • DATE the item was published (or last updated)
  11. 11. •Is the information current enough for your research needs?
  12. 12. •Is the most current information always the best?
  13. 13. MOST CURRENT • Science • Health/medicine • Business OLDER SOURCES • Historical topics • Humanities • Literature When do older sources work well?
  14. 14. • Does the information relate appropriately to your topic or help answer your research question? • Who is the intended audience?
  15. 15. • WHOM is it written for? • Consider your own level of knowledge in selecting a source.
  16. 16. • Is it at a level that you can understand and use? –Too easy –Too difficult Ask yourself: Would you be comfortable citing this source in your research paper?
  17. 17. • QUALIFICATIONS of the writer - Image copyrighted by Wikimedia foundation
  18. 18. • Expert in field/ subject matter expert • “Peer review” • On websites: Look for About link • Contact information – Publisher – Email address
  19. 19. • .com • .org • .edu • .gov
  20. 20. • Different types of sources pull their information from different places. • The type of source can give you an idea of where the information they used came from.
  21. 21. At what stage of the cycle of information was your source written? And what does this mean?
  22. 22. Turn on the News Newspapers Magazines Scholarly Journals Event Happens Books
  23. 23. • As an event occurs, you get live reporting and footage. • Immediately after an event, you get more reporting and eyewitness accounts. • The further away from an event that you get, the more ANALYSIS you will find. • News Analysis • Expert Analysis • Scholarly Analysis
  24. 24. • Are the sources listed? – Are they scholarly? – Are they popular? – Are they credible? – How old are they? • Can they be checked?
  25. 25. A source with verifiable sources of information
  26. 26. • Has the information been reviewed or refereed?
  27. 27. “With clear documentation, a reader can hypothetically check the ACCURACY of a given source”(Quaratiello, 2011, p. 29).
  28. 28. • Absence of errors – spelling, grammar, typos
  29. 29. • WHY the item was written
  30. 30. Entertain
  31. 31. A source that is informational and unbiased.
  32. 32. POINT OF VIEW • Every source is going to have a point of view. • Does the author tell you his/her point of view? • Are both sides presented? • Is information presented fairly? BIAS • Some sources have a BIASED point of view. • Is one side presented exclusively or far more than the other? • Is charged or emotional language used?
  33. 33. • Evaluate what a simple Google search on your topic provides • Practice using the CRAAP Test – Evaluate the 2 Web sources you found last week
  34. 34. • Practice using the CRAAP Test on scholarly sources • Evaluate – Scholarly Journal Article – eBook
  35. 35. • Find a scholarly journal article on your topic using Google Scholar – Cite it in MLA or APA – Evaluate it using CRAAP Test
  36. 36. • Keep | Start | Stop • List ONE thing you would like your instructor to KEEP, START, and STOP doing. • List ONE thing YOU would like to KEEP, START, and STOP doing in order to do well in this course.
  37. 37. Quaratiello, A. (2011). The college student’s research companion: Finding, evaluating, and citing the resources you need to succeed (5th ed.). New York, NY: Neal-Schuman.

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