Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Gender-Responsive Resilience Building in the Caribbean

Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad

Check these out next

1 of 15 Ad

Gender-Responsive Resilience Building in the Caribbean

Download to read offline

Peer Learning Summit: Gender-responsive National Adaptation Plan (NAP) Processes

Montego Bay, Jamaica​ | July 26-28, 2022​

Peer Learning Summit: Gender-responsive National Adaptation Plan (NAP) Processes

Montego Bay, Jamaica​ | July 26-28, 2022​

Advertisement
Advertisement

More Related Content

More from International Institute for Sustainable Development (13)

Recently uploaded (20)

Advertisement

Gender-Responsive Resilience Building in the Caribbean

  1. 1. Gender-Responsive Resilience Building in the Caribbean Understanding the role of knowledge, attitudes, behaviours, and practices in coordination mechanism for climate change and disaster risk reduction
  2. 2. • The gender-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours of individuals are shaped by their lived experiences, perceptions, education, and culture. • At the institutional level, the policies and practices that are in place may or may not promote gender equality, both in the workplace and in interactions with external stakeholders. • Collectively, these factors influence the work of the institution, either creating the conditions for gender-responsive approaches or reinforcing barriers. • A KABP study presents an opportunity to explore these issues in a structured way, providing an informed basis to tackle discriminatory policies, practices and behaviours.
  3. 3. 112 Respondents from 9 countries: Antigua and Barbuda, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname
  4. 4. There are gaps in knowledge of gender issues and approaches. There is no single knowledge gap that emerges as most important to fill.
  5. 5. Respondents are aware that resilience to climate change and disasters has a gender dimension.
  6. 6. The workplace culture is not always respectful. Women are more likely to feel disrespected. Respondents are ready to address sexual harassment in the workplace.
  7. 7. The majority of respondents consider themselves to be gender equality champions in their institutions. Almost half of men always consider themselves to be champions for gender equality vs. 33% of women.
  8. 8. There are gaps in the institutional mechanisms for integrating gender in coordinating institutions for adaptation and DRR.
  9. 9. On an individual level, respondents are making efforts to integrate gender in their work with external stakeholders.
  10. 10. What is the biggest barrier to achieving gender equality in your country? “Misconceptions and patriarchy.”
  11. 11. What is the biggest barrier to achieving gender equality in your country? “The fact that managers and leaders think they are gender neutral, but in fact they are gender blind.”
  12. 12. Raise awareness of gender policies and mandates across different institutions. Make certain everyone understands that gender equality is their responsibility, regardless of their role. Raise awareness of gender policies and mandates across different institutions. Foster a safe and inclusive workplace culture. Eliminate discrimination through dialogue and other measures. Promote continuous learning by investing in gender training and mentoring. Create incentives for positive behaviours and practices related to gender equality. Put institutional mechanisms in place to support gender-responsive approaches. Build accountability by tracking and reporting on progress, both internally and externally.
  13. 13. Thank you!

×