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The Economic Benefits of Green City, Clean Waters

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The Economic Benefits of Green City, Clean Waters

  1. 1. The Economic Impact of Green City, Clean Waters Lee Huang, Senior Vice President Daniel Miles, Director Kate Raman, Associate Director January 27, 2016
  2. 2. Introduction The Economic Impact of Green City, Clean Waters  Cultivating a Triple Bottom Line Culture  About Green City, Clean Waters  Catalyzing a Best-in-Class GSI Industry Cluster  GSI Work Boosts the Local Economy  GSI is a Neighborhood Amenity  GSI Projects Advance Social Equity Presentation Overview
  3. 3. Introduction The Economic Impact of Green City, Clean Waters Cultivating a Triple Bottom Line Culture Economics Environment Equity
  4. 4. Introduction: Green City, Clean Waters The Economic Impact of Green City, Clean Waters About Green City, Clean Waters • An innovative response to federally established water quality requirements. • The mechanics of grey vs. green • $1.2B in public infrastructure investment • Regulations + incentives for private investment 125 public and 173 private projects completed to date. Source: 2.0 University Place
  5. 5. The Economic Impact of Green City, Clean Waters Catalyzing a Best-in-Class GSI Industry Cluster “a cost-saving program that lets Philadelphia Water minimize rate increases and keep water affordable for all” - Philadelphia Water “One of the more innovative things in Philadelphia…” - Forest Service’s Rodbell “Green stormwater infrastructure is a much more economically socially, and environmentally beneficial solution to stormwater management than other grey systems, such as storing water in tanks.” – City Parks Alliance  Regulation breeds innovation  Accolades & emulation  GSI Partners - double-digit revenue growth  Economic impact of GSI Partners' GSI work
  6. 6. GSI Projects The Economic Impact of Green City, Clean Waters GSI Projects Throughout the City of Philadelphia Source: ESI (2015) PUBLIC GREEN STORMWATER INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS PRIVATE GREEN STORMWATER INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS
  7. 7. Economic Impact The Economic Impact of Green City, Clean Waters GSI Work Boosts the Local Economy Source: Econsult Solutions (2015), GSI Partners (2015), IMPLAN (2013) Impact Type Total Impact Total expenditure impact ($M) $3,000 Total Job Impact 23,484 Total Labor income impact ($M) $1,500 Total City Tax Revenue ($M) $48  Billions in Public and Private Infrastructure Investment  Economic impact throughout city economy Jobs, labor income, and tax revenues
  8. 8. The Economic Impact of Green City, Clean Waters GSI is a Neighborhood Amenity  GSI = ecological service AND beloved amenity  Well-researched connection to quality of life gains to nearby residents  Property value gain = wealth boost for homeowners, property tax revenues for City & School District William Dick Elementary School Source: Philadelphia Water Department
  9. 9. GSI Projects The Economic Impact of Green City, Clean Waters GSI Projects Advance Social Equity Source: powercorpsphl.org/about-us/  Job/contract opportunities, grey vs. green  Support initiatives to encourage on-ramps to economic opportunity  Geographic distribution of benefits from GSI projects
  10. 10. The Economic Impact of Green City, Clean Waters Cultivating a Triple Bottom Line Culture Source: Albert Vecerka / Esto for Roofmeadow  Ecological Service AND Economic Impact AND neighborhood benefit  City's own actions + regulation/incentives/investm ent inducing private actions  Developers are increasingly seeing this as a deal-maker rather than a deal-breaker
  11. 11. The Economic Impact of Green City, Clean Waters Questions? Econsult Solutions, Inc. 1435 Walnut Street, Suite 300 Philadelphia, PA 19147 215-717-2777 Huang@econsultsolutions.com Miles@econsultsolutions.com Raman@econsultsolutions.com

Editor's Notes

  • (title slide)
    The Economic Impact of Green City, Clean Waters January 27, 2016 [SBN and ESI logos] [Lee]
  • (slide 1)
    title: Presentation Overview
    Cultivating a Triple Bottom Line Culture About Green City, Clean Waters Catalyzing a Best-in-Class GSI Industry Cluster GSI Projects Advance Social Equity GSI Work Boosts the Local Economy GSI is a Neighborhood Amenity [no visual] [Lee]
  • (slide 2)
    title: Cultivating a Triple Bottom Line Culture Economics Environment Equity [insert a triple bottom line visual off the Internet that shows Venn diagram of people/profits/planet] [Lee]
  • (slide 3)
    title: About Green City, Clean Waters
    An innovative response to federally established water quality requirements The mechanics of grey vs. green $1.2B in public infrastructure investment Regulations + incentives for private investment XXX public and XXX private projects to date [insert image of a nice-looking PWD GSI project] [Daniel]
     
  • kate
    Regulation breeds innovation –maintaining a diverse economy that fosters innovation
    There are two pivotal aspects of the perception gain for Philadelphia in being first and foremost in green stormwater infrastructure.
    First is the reputational enhancement to the City itself, as a place of innovation and triple bottom line solutions.
    Second are the export opportunities for Philadelphia vendors and service providers to do business outside of Philadelphia and thus support additional employment and tax base in Philadelphia.

    Accolades and emulation
    Many awards—11 awards since the program was initiated
    After the EPA permitted Philadelphia to move forward with Green Stormwater Infrastructure,
    Washington D.C. requested a modification of its 2005 stormwater storage tunnel plan to a
    "hybrid" system that includes a smaller tunnel network and new green infrastructure., reducing the cost of compliance.

    GSI Partners - double-digit revenue growth
    the work transcends traditional industry classifications, making it difficult to calculate the size of the GSI industry
    But we do know the size – and rapid growth – of SBN’s GSI Partners.
    These firms revenues totaled more than $146.8 million 2014, an increase of 14 percent from 2013

    Economic impact of GSI Partners' GSI work
    ESI constructed an economic impact model to estimate the scale and composition of spillover impacts generated by activity associated with GSI related industries in Philadelphia.
    Operations associated with the Philadelphia’s GSI Projects account for $35 million of total annual revenues for the 60 GSIP firms.
    The estimated local operations of GSI partner firms generate an annual economic impact of $57 million, supporting 430 direct, indirect, and induced jobs and $27 million in annual labor income within the City of Philadelphia.
  • kate
    GSI Projects Throughout the City of Philadelphia, Where are they and what kind of features are used

    Explain the maps, go over what green, gray and mix
    Controlling stormwater can be done with a combination of green and gray features.
    Green features include pervious paving, green roofs, rain gardens, stormwater bumpouts, stormwater planters, stormwater tree trenches, stormwater wetlands and swales.

    Grey features are subsurface features including subsurface basins, cisterns, rain barrels, and underground holding tanks.
    Macro Gray
    Micro Gray

    Where are the public projects--in the CSS and placed strategically reduce flooding and combined sewer overflows
    Where are the private projects—in areas that have a lot of development, new building with earth disturbance over 15,000 square feet must mitigate for stormwater. They are all over the city but concentrated in areas where development and retrofits are common
     
  • kate
    GSI Work Boosts the Local Economy Billions in public and private infrastructure investment

    The estimated total economic impact of spending over the next twenty-five years
    will lead to a total expenditure impact of $3.0 billion within the City,
    supporting 940 jobs each year
    and approximately $1.5 billion in total labor income
    The annual employment impact represents an average per year over the estimated 25-year period rather than a precise yearly impact.
    Construction spending and job demand is likely to fluctuate during varying phases of the project and will likely not stay constant over the three year period.

    The direct, indirect, and induced economic impacts generate tax revenues to the City of Philadelphia.
    The associated tax revenues come from the personal income or wages, sales, and business taxes directly and indirectly associated with the new developments.
    In aggregate, the City of Philadelphia will gain an additional $48 million of additional tax revenue over the next 25 years, or about $2 million per year during that time (see Table 3.4).
    just total expenditure impact, total job impact, total labor income impact, and total city tax revenue impact] [Kate]
  • (slide 8)
    title: GSI is a Neighborhood Amenity
    GSI = ecological service AND beloved amenity Well-researched connection to quality of life gains to nearby residents Property value gain = wealth boost for homeowners, property tax revenues for City & School District [insert streamlined table of property value impact, showing just average property value gain in % terms, aggregate property value gain throughout the city, and total annual property tax revenue increase] [Daniel]
  • kate

    One large grey project vs. many smaller green projects
    Gray stormwater projects are typically bid on by multinational engineering firms that have the scale and equipment to bid on and complete a project of this scale
    Green infrastructure projects are typically smaller and the bidding process is less capital intensive and smaller, local firms can participate

    Support initiatives to encourage on-ramps to economic opportunity
    The Green City Clean Waters program is supported by a growing network of advocacy groups, technical assistance providers, and other non-profits promoting GSI education and training.
    Overbrook Environmental Center
    In 2015, the Overbrook Environmental Education Center facilitated a 15-week Green Stormwater Infrastructure and Aesthetic Maintenance course to Philadelphia High School students.
    This course emphasized stormwater best management practices as directed in GCCW.
    PowerCorps
    Power Corps is an AmeriCorps program designed to support the City of Philadelphia’s youth violence prevention and workforce development initiatives.
    They annually enroll 100 individuals in a 9 month Green Streets Design and GSI Maintenance course with 6 weeks of paid field training

    Geographic distribution of benefits from GSI projects
    Public GSI projects are reducing flooding and combined sewer overflows for all of the city’s residents and are focused in the CSS
    Private projects are occurring all over the city and particularly where new development or redevelopment is occurring
  • (slide 10)
    title: Cultivating a Triple Bottom Line Culture Ecological service AND economic impact AND neighborhood benefit City's own actions + regulation/incentives/investment inducing private actions Developers are increasingly seeing this as a deal-maker rather than a deal-breaker [insert image of a nice-looking private GSI project] [Lee]
  • (slide 11)
    title: Questions?
    [insert image of a nice-looking PWD GSI project] [Lee]

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