Climate Change in Northwest Florida: Prevention and Adaptation

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A presentation given to the Escambia County Health Department as part of a statewide program that held meetings on climate change with health departments around the State of Florida. The presentation included local examples of both preventing climate change and adapting to climate change.

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Climate Change in Northwest Florida: Prevention and Adaptation

  1. 1. Climate Change in Northwest Florida: Prevention and Adaptation Christian Wagley www.sustainabletownconcepts.com
  2. 2. Land development is occurring at a farhigher rate than population growth,resulting in sprawl. In the nation’s 34metropolitan areas with populations greaterthan one million people, between 1950 and1990 the population increased 92.4%, whilethe urbanized land area grew by 245%, or2.65 times the population growth rate.Source: Our Built and Natural Environments: A Technical Review of theInteractions Between Land Use, Transportation, and Environmental Quality,USEPA
  3. 3. “Annual price changes in most of the largestmetro areas, including New York, LosAngeles, Chicago, Miami, SanFrancisco, Seattle, Baltimore, WashingtonD.C., and Philadelphia, followed a similarpattern: Values were most stable within a 10-mile radius of the center of the city, butgenerally worsened with each successiveradius ring as far as 50 miles from the centerof the city.”Business Week, July 12, 2008
  4. 4. Comparing Transportation and Operating Energy Use for an Office BuildingSource: Environmental Building News, September 1, 2007
  5. 5. For an average new officebuilding built to code,transportation accounts formore than twice as muchenergy use as buildingoperation.
  6. 6. Form-based codes support theseoutcomes: walkable and mixed-useneighborhoods, transportation options,conservation of open lands, local character,housing diversity, and vibrant downtowns.Form-based codes discourage theseoutcomes: sprawl development, automobiledependency, loss of open lands, monotonoussubdivisions, deserted downtowns, and unsafestreets and parks.
  7. 7. More compact, mixed-usecommunities that follow traditionalurban development patterns arebest able to reduce greenhouse gasemissions and help prevent climatechange
  8. 8. The patterns demonstrating how to doit right are all around us
  9. 9. We cannot fully prevent and adapt toclimate change until we change therules of development to make it legalto build compact, mixed-use, walkablecommunities
  10. 10. A policy of strategic retreat advocatedby state and local governments wouldreduce vulnerability of the builtenvironment to sea level rise
  11. 11. QUESTIONS? Christian Wagleychristian@sustainabletownconcepts.com www.sustainabletownconcepts.com 850-687-9968

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