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Airport Operations & Traffic Pattern Operations

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Airport Operations & Traffic Pattern Operations

  1. 1. LAHSO RUNWAY INCURSIONS TRAFFIC PATTERN WIND INDICATORS ATIS AIRPORT LIGHTING Created By: Edwin A. Pitty Sanchez
  2. 2. Is a location where aircraft such as fixed- wing aircraft, helicopters, etc. T/O and Land. Created By: Edwin A. Pitty Sanchez
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  4. 4. AIM 2-3-3 Visual Non-Precision PrecisionCreated By: Edwin A. Pitty Sanchez
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  6. 6. Sometimes construction, maintenance, or other activities require the threshold to be relocated towards the rollout end of the runway. Created By: Edwin A. Pitty Sanchez
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  9. 9. The soft concrete bed, called EMAS, for engineered material arresting systems, extends about 600 feet from the runway's end Created By: Edwin A. Pitty Sanchez
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  14. 14. AIM 4-3-11 Land and Hold Short Clearances (LAHSO) are issued by ATC at towered airports to increase efficiency • Hold short points can be: – Intersecting runway. – Intersecting taxiway. – Other designated hold short point. • Pilots must stop the aircraft prior to reaching the designated hold short point. – Failure to do so may compromise safety. – The pilot has the option to decline a LAHSO clearance when issued. Created By: Edwin A. Pitty Sanchez
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  16. 16. • Pilot has final authority to accept LAHSO • Become familiar with LAHSO operations at destination prior to departure – Consult A/FD • In the event of a rejected landing, maintain safe separation and notify ATC immediately • Readback all LAHSO clearances in full – Do not make controller ask for a readback • Maintain situational awareness – Have airport diagram and ALD info available • Brief other cockpit crewmembers • Pilots should only be issued LAHSO clearances with ceilings at least 1,000’ and visibility 3 SMCreated By: Edwin A. Pitty Sanchez
  17. 17. Airport lighting may include one or more of the following: – Airport beacon – Visual glideslope indicators – Runway lighting • Edge lighting • Runway centerline lighting • Touchdown zone lighting • Taxiway lead-off lights – Taxiway lighting • Edge lighting • Taxiway centerline lighting – Approach lighting system – Obstruction lighting Created By: Edwin A. Pitty Sanchez
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  19. 19. Visual glideslope indicators are light systems which indicate your position in relation to the desired glide path to the runway – Visual Approach Slope Indicator (VASI) – Tricolor VASI – Pulsating Approach Path Indicator (PLASI) – Precision Approach Path Indicator (PAPI) Created By: Edwin A. Pitty Sanchez
  20. 20. • Normally set at 3 glide path • Safe obstruction clearance within 10 of center-line and 4 NM • Visible from 3-5 miles (day) and 20 miles (night) Created By: Edwin A. Pitty Sanchez
  21. 21. • Three-bar VASI provides two glide paths – Near and middle bars same as 2 bar VASI – Middle and far bars form an upper glide path for large aircraft • ¼ degree steeper than first VASI set • 700 feet beyond middle bars Created By: Edwin A. Pitty Sanchez
  22. 22. Tri-Color VASI Created By: Edwin A. Pitty Sanchez
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  24. 24. • Single light unit projecting a two color visual approach path • Range is 4 miles (day) and 10 miles (night) Created By: Edwin A. Pitty Sanchez
  25. 25. • Obstructions not in the vicinity of an airport – Red or white beacons and/or flashing lights are used to mark man-made obstructions and hazards to aerial navigation • Airport obstruction lighting – Steady red lights mark obstructions and hazards in the vicinity of an airport • Includes end-of-runway lights Created By: Edwin A. Pitty Sanchez
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  29. 29. RWLS Created By: Edwin A. Pitty Sanchez
  30. 30. • AC 91-73A – Five major categories: • Planning • Situational Awareness • Use of Written Taxi Instructions • ATC/Pilot Communications • Taxiing • AC 120-74A – Adds one more category: • Intra-Flightdeck/Cockpit Verbal Coordination Created By: Edwin A. Pitty Sanchez
  31. 31. ICAO Station Winds Visibility & Obstructions to Visibility Temperature Altimeter Setting Ceiling Conditions Runway in Use Ceilings and visibility may not be reported if ceilings are above 5,000 feet, and/or the visibility is greater than 5 SM. Created By: Edwin A. Pitty Sanchez
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