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Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
Polar  bears
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Polar bears

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  • 1. POLAR BEARS
  • 2. Vocabulary-nouns ADULT MALE FEMALE COASTLINE SEAL RUDDER DEN SNOWSHOES HABITAT BLOW FUR CUB SKIN DOSPĚLÝ SAMEC SAMICE POBŘEŽÍ TULEŇ KORMIDLO DOUPĚ SNĚŽNICE OBLAST VÝSKYTU ÚDER SRST MLÁDĚ POKOŽKA
  • 3. Vocabulary – adjectives/verbs BLIND DEAF HAIRLESS SLIPPERY PADDLE COME ASHORE HUNT FOR PREY SLEPÝ HLUCHÝ BEZ SRSTI KLUZKÝ PÁDLOVA DOSTAT SE NA BŘEH LOVIT KOŘIST
  • 4. Polar bears habitual range Five nations have polar bear populations: the United States (Alaska), Canada, Russia, Greenland, and
  • 5. Basic facts sea bear, started to evolve about five million years ago from brown bear ancestors weigh length fur skin 295 - 490 kg 2.5 – 3 metres thick-10cm fat layer yellowish or white black to absorb heat
  • 6. Communication Polar bears use a combination of body languageand vocalizations to communicate. Head wagging from side to side often occurs when polar bears want to play. Adult bears initiate play—which is actually ritualized fighting or mock battling—by standing on their hind legs, chin lowered to their chests, and front paws hanging by their sides
  • 7. Nose-to-nose greetings are the way a bear asks another bear for something, such as food. The guest bear will approach slowly, circle around a carcass, and then meekly touch the other bear's nose. Bears who use proper manners are often allowed to share a kill. Attacking polar bears charge forward with heads down and ears laid back.
  • 8. Chuffing sounds are a response to stress, often heard when a mother bear is worried for her cubs' safety. Mother bears scold cubs with a low growl or soft cuff. When a male approaches a female with cubs, she rushes toward him with her head lowered. Hissing and snorting and a lowered head all signify aggression. Loud roars or growls communicate anger. Deep growls are warnings, perhaps in defense of a food source.
  • 9. FUR Polar bears look whitest when they are clean and in sunlight, especially just after the molt period, which usually begins in spring and is complete by late summer. Before molting, oils from the seals they eat can make them look yellow Molt period – línání,pelíchání
  • 10. CUBS Usually 2 (1 or triplets) stays with mother for 3 months weigh 0.5-1kg hairless ,blind,deaf Usually 2 (1 or triplets) stays with mother for 3 months weigh 0.5-1kg hairless ,blind,deaf
  • 11. CUBS For at least 20 months, cubs drink their mother's milk and depend on her for survival. Her success at hunting is critical for her own needs and for teaching cubs to find food for themselves. In the Low Arctic weaning occurs as cubs approach their second birthday. Cubs in the High Arctic generally receive an additional year of care.
  • 12. FOOD walrus whale polar fox seal
  • 13. GLOBAL WARMING • Floods. Droughts. Heat waves. Monster tornadoes Floods. Droughts(sucho). Heat waves(vlny veder). Monster tornadoes. Climate change is not just about polar bears, the iconic symbol of a melting(tající) Arctic
  • 14. How are polar bears affected by global warming? Polar bears have evolved for a life on the sea ice, which they rely on(spoléhají se na) for reaching their seal prey(kořist). But the arctic sea ice is rapidly diminishing(mizí) due to(díky) a warming Earth. reduced access(omezenýpřístup) to food drop in(pokles) body condition lower cub survival rates(míra přežití) increase in drowning(utopení) increase in cannibalism
  • 15. The problem of global warming Because the temperature on Earth is constantly increasing, the sea ice is melting. The polar ice- cap gets further from the land. It´s more difficult for bears to get their food, especially for mothers to that go to the land to give birth to their babies. They will need to swim back to the ice cap to hunt for their food. But it´s a very long distance. Sometimes it can be more than one hundred kilometres. Every year. Many bears die from starvation. They can die by drowning, too.
  • 16. Polar bears - Patient seal hunters Polar bears need the ice to hunt their favourite meal – seals. Seals swim in the sea and they go to the edges of ice- caps. That´s where the bears catch them. But how? A bear uses its excellent sense of smell to find holes in the ice that seals use for breathing. Then, it waits patiently to catch the seal. It can také several days but the fat from one seal is enough for one week.
  • 17. Polar bears in captivity History of polar bears in captivity. The earliest known captive polar bear was housed by Ptolemy II, king of ancient Egypt (285-246 B.C.), in his private zoo in Alexandria. Romans probably also kept polar bears. In 57 A.D., Calpurnius wrote of bears pitted against seals in a flooded amphitheater. Harold the Fair-haired of Norway received a mother and cubs in 880 A.D. from a hunter and rewarded the man with a ship filled with wood.
  • 18. Polar bears in captivity Early maps led to sources of polar bears and white falcons. Viking hunters killed mother bears and caught her cubs by attracting them to her pelt. Early rulers in Denmark, England, Germany, and Damascus kept captive polar bears. In 1874, America's first zoo opened in Philadelphia. Its bear pits were its most popular attraction.
  • 19. HUNTING Today, legal hunting continues on a limited, regulated basis for native peoples. Norway is the only polar bear nation that protects polar bears from all forms of hunting. Three of the other four nations permit native hunts—a traditionally important cultural activity and source of income. Canada is the only nation that allows sport or trophy hunting by non-natives and non- citizens.
  • 20. Walking Walking. Polar bears walk at about five to six kilometers per hour. Females with small cubs slow their speed to two and a half to four kilometers per hour. Polar bears are well known for their slow, plodding gait.
  • 21. Running Running. Polar bears can run as fast as 40 kilometers per hour—but only for short distances. Younger, leaner bears are the best runners. They can cover two kilometers without stopping. Older, larger bears quickly overheat.
  • 22. Polar bears - sleeping Sleeping. Most polar bears sleep for seven to eight hours at a stretch and they take naps, too. In that way, they're a lot like people. On the ice in spring and summer, polar bears tend to sleep more during the day than at night, probably because seals are more active at night. But day and nighthold little meaning in the Arctic where there are 24 hours of daylight in summer and 24 hours of darkness in winter. Polar bears nap just about anywhere and any time, and especially after feeding on a seal. Napping helps bears conserve energy. A polar bear's entire existence centers on hunting and conserving energy.
  • 23. Maternity Polar bears sleep right through blizzards in day beds dug in the lee of a ridge. The snow piles up on top of them and provides an insulating blanket. Sometimes they stay curled up under the snow for several days until the storm passes. In summer, polar bears curl up on the tundra or on an ice patch, sometimes using a block of ice or an outstretched paw as a pillow. Landlocked bears dig sleeping pits in the sand or in gravel ridges along the shoreline. Pregnant females dig maternity dens in snow banks in fall and give birth to cubs in early winter. Until March or April when they emerge from the den, mother and cubs spend their time sleeping.
  • 24. SOURCES • http://www.polarbearsinternational.org/abou t-polar-bears/global-warming#Affect • R/R magazine – article „Mosaic“ • http://www.google.cz/imgres?imgurl=http://3 .bp.blogspot.com ( picture sources)

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