‘Space’ Matters: Creating  Starlight Express Rooms      Felicity McMahon, Head of ProgramsElizabeth Kelly-Dalgety, Researc...
Design is about making things good (and    then better) and right (and fantastic) for the    people who use and encounter ...
Who we are?       The Starlight Children’s Foundation (Starlight) provides a       range of programs for seriously ill and...
What is a Starlight Express Room?    State-of-the-art, multimedia entertainment and distraction rooms    Encompass a range...
Who uses the SER?    Inpatients: from toddlers through to young adults     –   Medical conditions vary    Outpatients    S...
Starlight Express Rooms    Assist in the reduction of loneliness and isolation for children and    young people in hospita...
A conceptual model of the effects of children’s physical                                environments on child health outco...
SER at the Women’s And               Children’s Hospital, Adelaide    First SER opened at the Children’s Hospital Camperdo...
Let’s take a look …
Video9
Then and Now     Previous SERs                WCH SER     • Tunnel entrance            • Shop front     • Use of primary c...
Display window to         show case     children’s art work        and monthly           themes  TV screenadvertising dail...
Display area for        art work     Movablefurniture for ease  of wheelchair      access                                 ...
Lockable                                                                    office and                                    ...
Our experience and incorporation into the                                WCH SER, Adelaide:     FEEDBACK/SUGGESTION       ...
Our experience     FEEDBACK/SUGGESTION         RESPONSE     Noise Management            •   Use of sound absorbing materia...
Snapshot Review – what did we                            learn?16
Snapshot Review – what did we                                learn?     Visitors were able to move    Younger children (un...
Snapshot Review – what did we learn?     Staff/volunteers:                   Children:        Active in supporting childre...
Snapshot review – what did we                                  learn?     Staff/volunteers indicated high levels of satisf...
What next?Building upon our experience and evidence base      we continue to evolve the SER design
Thank you     www.starlight.org.au21
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Felicity McMahon - Space Matters: Creating Starlight Express Rooms

427 views
305 views

Published on

A presentation given by Felicity McMahon at the CHA Conference 2012, The Journey, in 'The How To of Family & Patient Centred Care' stream.

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
427
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • A national evaluation of SERs highlighted a number of key design considerations. Examples of the considerations and ways in which they were incorporated into the WCH SER design are highlighted on the next 2 slides
  • Felicity McMahon - Space Matters: Creating Starlight Express Rooms

    1. 1. ‘Space’ Matters: Creating Starlight Express Rooms Felicity McMahon, Head of ProgramsElizabeth Kelly-Dalgety, Research and Evaluation Dr Ralph Hampson, Research and Evaluation
    2. 2. Design is about making things good (and then better) and right (and fantastic) for the people who use and encounter them — Matt Beale.1
    3. 3. Who we are? The Starlight Children’s Foundation (Starlight) provides a range of programs for seriously ill and hospitalised children, young people and their families, including: – Captain Starlight – Starlight Express Rooms – Starlight TV – Wish granting – Livewire.org.au – Livewire in hospital – Community Outreach (NT) Focus of this presentation: Starlight Express Rooms (SER) are located in 7 paediatric hospitals in Australia.2
    4. 4. What is a Starlight Express Room? State-of-the-art, multimedia entertainment and distraction rooms Encompass a range of arts, entertainment and recreational activities Provide a medical-free space Facilitated by Captain Starlight, volunteers and Livewire Facilitators Incorporates Starlight TV which broadcasts movies and live shows from the SER to children and young people on the wards Opens between 5-7 days per week with the majority opening between 10am-4pm daily3
    5. 5. Who uses the SER? Inpatients: from toddlers through to young adults – Medical conditions vary Outpatients Siblings and friends of the patients Parents Starlight team: Captain Starlight, Livewire Facilitators and volunteers, Hospital Program Manager4
    6. 6. Starlight Express Rooms Assist in the reduction of loneliness and isolation for children and young people in hospital Accommodate the different developmental needs of children and young people Are inclusive and supportive of the whole family Connect patients and their families with others Provide free activities for children and young people Provide a platform to reach out to children on the wards who cannot physically come to the SER through Starlight TV and Ward Rounds5
    7. 7. A conceptual model of the effects of children’s physical environments on child health outcomes Physical Environmental Health Environment Satisfaction Outcomes • Nature • Subjective • Physical • Noise appraisal of • Psychological • Crowding environment • Emotional (social and • Feeling of • Cognitive spatial) control over • Behavioural • Art/Decorations the environment • Social • Lighting • Temperature • Music Reference: Sherman, S. A. Shepley, M. M., & Varni, J. W. (2005). Children’s Environments and Health –Related Quality of Life: Evidence Informing Paediatric Healthcare Environmental Design. Children, Youth and Environments 15(1), 188-223.6
    8. 8. SER at the Women’s And Children’s Hospital, Adelaide First SER opened at the Children’s Hospital Camperdown in 1991 SER at the Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Adelaide opened in 2011 This was the first build in many years with the design influenced by: – A review of the research on the impact of hospital and indoor play spaces on children’s wellbeing – Needs Analysis interviews with young people, parents and health professionals – Feedback from a national survey of SERs First multi-purpose space catering for children during the day, and a space exclusively for young people in the evenings7
    9. 9. Let’s take a look …
    10. 10. Video9
    11. 11. Then and Now Previous SERs WCH SER • Tunnel entrance • Shop front • Use of primary colours • Use of calming colours • Outer-space themes • Themes of nature • One centralised activity • Dedicated activity spaces space • Standard lighting • LED lighting • Standardised hospital • Nature themed floor flooring approved by hospital • Standard finishing • Need specific finishes, e.g. Use of patterned vinyl decals on walls to create a line of vision.10
    12. 12. Display window to show case children’s art work and monthly themes TV screenadvertising daily events Open ‘shop front’ to Enclosed working and encourage families to multi-media areas enter Large windows to allow for natural light and viewing of activities11
    13. 13. Display area for art work Movablefurniture for ease of wheelchair access State-of-the-art, arts facilities to Pebbled garden support participant Vine leaf patterns to provide path – emulate and staff line of sight (safety) without nature; encourage engagement in being obtrusive focus on activities destination12
    14. 14. Lockable office and kitchenette out of view of the RoomLED lighting to add State-of- excitement and the-art in mediate gaming‘atmosphere’ in the technology Room Use of wood paneling to add ‘warmth’ / ‘homeliness’ to the space Screens and Seating designed to adapt cupboards to a multitude of activities built into the Flooring and support ‘nature’ theme walls durable and inspired by nature 13
    15. 15. Our experience and incorporation into the WCH SER, Adelaide: FEEDBACK/SUGGESTION RESPONSE Adaptable/Flexible • Fixed items are embedded into the walls, space to accommodate remaining items can be easily moved or stored a variety of activities out of sight, e.g. retractable stage Disability Access • Accommodates wheelchairs, medical equipment, e.g. IV drips, beds • Creation of open spaces and ample room around portable furnishings Supports interactive art • Designated arts and crafts glassed room. activities; opportunity to • Display window to show case visitors work. display work; storage • Storage facilities available across three walls. • Surface of cupboards designed to support and highlight art work Colour that emulates • LED lighting system to randomly change colour positivity and fun14
    16. 16. Our experience FEEDBACK/SUGGESTION RESPONSE Noise Management • Use of sound absorbing materials Access to elements of • Interior design emulating elements of nature, nature, including if e.g. cloud and wood panelling possible, an outside view • View though front windows onto courtyard. Flexible lighting to • Strength of lighting controllable support a range of • Access to natural light available activities Use of technology in new • State-of-the -art technology and multi-media and innovative ways and gaming facilities • LED lightning to facilitate ‘atmosphere’ of room • TV screen at entrance promoting activities15
    17. 17. Snapshot Review – what did we learn?16
    18. 18. Snapshot Review – what did we learn? Visitors were able to move Younger children (under 7) freely and safely were more likely to engage in arts-based activities Separate activity spaces supported immersement in Preteens and adolescents designated activities engaged with the gaming facilities. All children and adolescent visitors participated in Easily adapted to activities accommodate needs of visitors with a disability Parents engaged with, or supported involvement of Noise levels can be adjusted their child in activities to accommodate children’s needs17
    19. 19. Snapshot Review – what did we learn? Staff/volunteers: Children: Active in supporting children, Participated and were young people and parents to immersed in in a range of participate in activities activities of their choosing Adapted and worked within Visibly agitated parents the space to engage a range calmed down of age appropriate and Encouraged and supported cognitive needs to engage activities that Collaborated with other extend their skill set hospital departments e.g. Interacted with family educational services members – supported by the Visitors: use of electronic or logic games Seating design and flexibility encouraged interaction Parents talked positively amongst visitors about their experience and18 made plans to return
    20. 20. Snapshot review – what did we learn? Staff/volunteers indicated high levels of satisfaction with their personal and visitor engagement Staff/volunteers did not identify structural and interior aspects of the WCH SER they would like changed Minor ‘tweaking’ of the space - suggestions focused predominately on improving the capacity to display and store large art projects19
    21. 21. What next?Building upon our experience and evidence base we continue to evolve the SER design
    22. 22. Thank you www.starlight.org.au21

    ×