Types of Social Groups
<ul><li>A Social Group is formed when 2 or more people are in the same physical location and aware of one another’s presen...
<ul><li>A  Transitory Group  is when several people happen to be in the same place at the same time but who may never be a...
<ul><li>A  Recurrent Group  is one that meets regularly. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples:  the field hockey team; an annual fam...
<ul><li>A  Formal Group  is one that has rules and regulations, scheduled meeting times, official roles assigned to member...
<ul><li>An  Informal Group  lacks the formality of the formal group.  There may be unwritten rules, etc. </li></ul><ul><li...
<ul><li>An  In-Group  is simply any group someone belongs to and feels emotional attachment to the members.  </li></ul><ul...
<ul><li>Group members differ in the ways they interact with one another as well.  This determines whether a group is  Prim...
<ul><li>Emotional Intensity: </li></ul><ul><li>Primary:  Strong emotional attachment among members, love </li></ul><ul><li...
<ul><li>Scope </li></ul><ul><li>Primary:  An individual’s entire personality is important to the group.  </li></ul><ul><li...
<ul><li>Particularism/ Universalism </li></ul><ul><li>Primary : Each individual is important to the group.  The group is p...
<ul><li>Interaction </li></ul><ul><li>Primary:  very informal.  Members feel relaxed around one another </li></ul><ul><li>...
<ul><li>Aims </li></ul><ul><li>Primary:  goal is simply to enjoy one another’s company </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary:  the  ...
<ul><li>Rules & Regulations </li></ul><ul><li>Primary:  Rules may be understood rather than written down and are very flex...
<ul><li>Discuss how these characteristics apply to a family (a Primary Group relationship) and a group of co-workers at We...
<ul><li>Membership in these groups overlap.   A group could be recurrent, formal and secondary (student council). It might...
<ul><li>Work in groups and develop a unique example of each of the following combinations: </li></ul><ul><li>Recurrent, in...
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Types Of Social Groups Powerpoint

  1. 1. Types of Social Groups
  2. 2. <ul><li>A Social Group is formed when 2 or more people are in the same physical location and aware of one another’s presence. </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>A Transitory Group is when several people happen to be in the same place at the same time but who may never be again. Their interaction is minimal. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: people crossing the street at the same time at the same intersection; people getting onto the same elevator; people waiting in line at the checkout at CVS </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>A Recurrent Group is one that meets regularly. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: the field hockey team; an annual family gathering; a monthly AA meeting </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>A Formal Group is one that has rules and regulations, scheduled meeting times, official roles assigned to members (such as treasurer, coach, etc.), official membership list, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: Spanish club; Congress; Sociology class </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>An Informal Group lacks the formality of the formal group. There may be unwritten rules, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: a group of friends; a family; commuters sharing a bus </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>An In-Group is simply any group someone belongs to and feels emotional attachment to the members. </li></ul><ul><li>An Out-Group is one that someone doesn’t belong to and feels competition and/or hatred towards. These two are different for each individual. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples of the above: rival gangs, rival teams or their fans; cliques at school </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Group members differ in the ways they interact with one another as well. This determines whether a group is Primary or Secondary. These differ in the following ways. </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Emotional Intensity: </li></ul><ul><li>Primary: Strong emotional attachment among members, love </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary: Little emotion felt among members toward one another </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>Scope </li></ul><ul><li>Primary: An individual’s entire personality is important to the group. </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary: Only a small piece of an individual’s personality is important to the group. Can they do the job assigned? </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>Particularism/ Universalism </li></ul><ul><li>Primary : Each individual is important to the group. The group is particular about who can be a member </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary: Membership is open to all </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Interaction </li></ul><ul><li>Primary: very informal. Members feel relaxed around one another </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary: formal. Rules exist to explain how and when interaction takes place </li></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>Aims </li></ul><ul><li>Primary: goal is simply to enjoy one another’s company </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary: the group meets for a specific reason. Members may have little in common beyond the reason for the group’s existence </li></ul>
  14. 14. <ul><li>Rules & Regulations </li></ul><ul><li>Primary: Rules may be understood rather than written down and are very flexible. Punishments for breaking them are also flexible. </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary: Rules are formalized and each member must follow the same rules. Punishments also are applied in a standard way for all members. </li></ul>
  15. 15. <ul><li>Discuss how these characteristics apply to a family (a Primary Group relationship) and a group of co-workers at Wendy’s (a Secondary Group Relationship) </li></ul>
  16. 16. <ul><li>Membership in these groups overlap. A group could be recurrent, formal and secondary (student council). It might also be recurrent, informal and primary (a dating couple). Members might belong to a formal group (co-workers on the job) but form informal groups (co-workers who become friends or even begin dating each other). They might interact in a primary and secondary way with differing members of the same group. </li></ul>
  17. 17. <ul><li>Work in groups and develop a unique example of each of the following combinations: </li></ul><ul><li>Recurrent, informal, secondary </li></ul><ul><li>Recurrent, formal, secondary </li></ul><ul><li>Recurrent, informal primary </li></ul><ul><li>Recurrent, formal, primary </li></ul><ul><li>Transitory, informal, secondary </li></ul><ul><li>In-group </li></ul><ul><li>Out-group </li></ul><ul><li>Do not repeat the examples already given in class. </li></ul><ul><li>Remember, to be a group, members must be in the same place at the same time. So the National Honor Society is not a group. The SAHS chapter of the NHS is a group. </li></ul>
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