Constructivism and the montessori educational method

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  • 1. A Learning Theory Put into Practice:
  • 2. Roots: Cognitive Psychology and Biology Based On: Experimental Learning through life experiences to construct knowledge.  What It Is: Adaptive learning that challenges thinking by integrating prior experience to create new knowledge. It allows for creative, original and innovative work.  What It Does: Encourages discovery through project or tasked based learning, hands-on and experimental and often, collaborative work.  
  • 3. The Student: Self-directed, creative and innovative. The Students Culture: The culture or embedded world view will allow the student to arrive at his/her own version of “Truth”.  The Students Role: Progressively begins to take responsibility for their own learning as they proportionally gain the skills to do so.  The Students Motivation: Mastery of skills and problem solving gained from experimentation give confidence in their learning potential.  
  • 4.  The Educator: Takes the role of facilitator in helping students to take active roles in discovery and in coming to their own conclusions.
  • 5.  Its Roots: Maria Montessori first studied mentally disabled children in asylums in Rome. Through those discoveries she wanted to apply her techniques on mentally “normal” children. That first school, Casa de Bambini, opened in 1907 in Italy.
  • 6.  The Philosophy: Children are naturally eager for knowledge and capable of initiating learning within a supportive environment.
  • 7.  Its Distinctive: Multi-age grouping for peer learning, uninterrupted blocks of discovery time, guided choice of work activities and specially designed learning materials.
  • 8.  The Triangle: Teacher, Student and Environment encourage independence, freedom without limits and provide a sense of order. The child uses what the environment offers and interacts with the teacher only as support or guidance is needed.
  • 9.  The Stages: Four Planes of Development Age 0-6 Age 6-12 Age 12-18 Age 18-24 First Plane Second Plane Third Plane Fourth Plane Dr. Montessori’s 4 Stages of Development were labeled “Planes”. The 1st and 3rd planes are periods of intense creation, while the 2nd and 4th planes are calm.
  • 10.  The Stages: Four Planes of Development Age 0-6 Early Childhood The Sensitive Period 0-3 Unconscious/3-6 Conscious First Plane Characterized by: The intense need for Order Language development Refinement of senses Movement Concrete Thinking Construction of physical person, character Physical Independence - “I do it myself”
  • 11.  The Stages: Four Planes of Development Age 6-12 Childhood Construction of The Intelligence Second Plane Characterized by: Reasoning with imagination and logic A thirst for knowledge Learning about the universe and his/her place in it A sense of morality and Justice Reasoning skills; the “How” and the “Why” Intellectual independence - “I can think it myself”
  • 12.  The Stages: Four Planes of Development Age 12-18 Adolescence Construction of Social Self Third Plane Characterized by: Self concern and self assessment Critical thinking and re-evaluation Transition period both physically and mentally Trying to find place in the world Construction of social and moral values Ongoing cultural development is solidified here
  • 13.  The Stages: Four Planes of Development Age 18-24 Adulthood Construction of Self Understanding Fourth Plane Characterized by: Construction of spiritual values Conscious discernment of right and wrong Seeking to know ones place in the world Financial independence
  • 14. CONSTRUCTIVISM THEORY MONTESSORI METHOD  Experimental Learning through life experiences to construct knowledge.  Naturally eager to learn and capable of initiating learning through play.  Adaptive learning that challenges thinking by integrating prior experience to create new knowledge. It allows for creative, original and innovative work.  As child passes from the concrete to the abstract , he begins the application of his knowledge to real-world experiences.  Progressively begins to take on responsibility for their learning as they proportionally gain the skills to do so.  Create a desire in the student to tackle challenges and a desire to go beyond the classroom environment for exploration.  Takes the role of facilitator in helping students to take active roles in discovery and in coming to their own conclusions.  Teacher facilitates a sense of order with the child using them for support or guidance is needed.
  • 15. This presentation was created with the intention of informing those interested in the Montessori Methodology. Be it teacher considering to implement portions into their classroom, or complete change overs, to perhaps a parent wanting to supplement their own child's education.
  • 16. Mooney, Carol G.. Theories of Childhood. Special ed. Pearson Education Inc.: Redleaf Press, 2000. Print. Montessori, Maria, Montessori Method, The. Wilder Publications LLC, Radford, VA , 2008. Print. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montessori_education http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constructivism_(philosophy_ of_education) http://www.mediachildrenshouse.com/about-us/themontessori-method/four-planes-of-development http://www.montessoriedu.org/montessori-education //www.amshq.org/Montessori-Education/Introduction-toMontessori.aspx http://www.montessori.org/ http://www.montessoriedu.org/