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Learning outcomes
 

Learning outcomes

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Writing learning outcomes

Writing learning outcomes

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    Learning outcomes Learning outcomes Presentation Transcript

    • WritingLearningOutcomesBest Practices
    • Workshop’s LearningOutcomesAttendees will:• Summarize the role of learning outcomes in instruction, in order to illustrate an understanding of assessment’s importance. – Why we are writing learning outcomes – The role of learning outcomes in assessment – Why it is important to assess student learning
    • Workshop’s LearningOutcomesAttendees will:• Recognize the levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy, in order to select verbs that map to instruction objectives. – Levels of behavioral outcomes – Cognitive domain – Levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy – Bloom’s group activity
    • Workshop’s LearningOutcomesAttendees will:• Construct learning outcomes from learning objectives, in order to develop assessable learning outcomes for QEP proposals. – Learning outcomes formula – Characteristics of good learning outcomes – Example learning outcomes
    • What are learningoutcomes?• Formal statements that articulate: – What students are able to do after instruction – Why students need to do this• Objectives vs. Outcomes• Process/Fluid
    • Why assess?• It builds evidence for accountability, accreditation and improvement. – Show evidence of how well our students learn. – Use evidence for continuous improvement.
    • Simply put• Know what you are doing• Know why you are doing it• Know what students are learning as a result• Changing because of that information
    • Shifting from• Teaching to learning• Teaching effectiveness to learning results• Private affair to community property
    • Some benefits of learningoutcomes• select content• develop of instructional strategy• develop and select instructional materials• construct tests and other instruments for assessing and evaluating• improve you as a teacher, and our overall program
    • Writing LearningOutcomes• Learning Outcomes Formula• Bloom’s Taxonomy• Characteristics of Good Learning Outcomes• Learning Outcomes Exercise• Write Your Learning Outcomes
    • Theory Into Practice5 Questions for Instructional Design1. What do you want the student to be able to do? (Outcome)2. What does the student need to know in order to do this well? (Curriculum)3. What activity will facilitate the learning? (Pedagogy)4. How will the student demonstrate the learning? (Assessment)5. How will I know the student has done this well? (Criteria) ACRL’s IIL Immersion Summer 2005
    • 1. What do you want thestudent to be able to do?This question asks you to develop the outcome.For Example:Student identifies, consults and evaluates reference books appropriate to the topic in order to locate background information and statistics. ACRL’s IIL Immersion Summer 2005
    • Learning OutcomesFormula Verb Great Or + Why? = “In Order To” Learning Outcomes Action Phrase ORWhat students need Why do they need toto know? know this?“Student identifies, “In Order To” “locate backgroundconsults and evaluates information andreference books statistics.”appropriate to the topic” ACRL’s IIL Immersion Summer 2005
    • Importance of Verbs• Behavioral Outcomes – Affective Domain – Psychomotor Domain – Cognitive Domain • Bloom’s Taxonomy
    • Cognitive Domain• Involves knowledge and the development of intellectual skills• Bloom’s Taxonomy – Hierarchy of objectives according to cognitive complexity – Higher-level objectives include, and are dependant on lower level cognitive skills
    • Bloom’s Taxonomy• Knowledge• Comprehension• Application• Analysis• Synthesis• Evaluation
    • Bloom’s – Lower Levels• Knowledge – Recalling previously learned information such as facts, terminology, rules, etc. – Answers may be memorized or closely paraphrased from assigned material. – Define, list, name, recall
    • Bloom’s – Lower Levels• Comprehension – Ability to comprehend the meaning of material. – Answers must be in the student’s own words while still using terminology appropriate to the course material. – Explain, summarize, distinguish between, restate
    • Bloom’s – Lower Levels• Demonstrate rote or surface learning• Declarative or Procedural Knowledge• Answers found in the assigned materials• 80% of HS teachers test at these levels
    • Bloom’s – Higher Levels• Application – Requires recognizing, identifying, or applying a concept or principle in a new situation or solving a new problem. – May require identifying or generating examples not found in assigned materials. – Demonstrate, arrange, relate, adapt
    • Bloom’s – Higher Levels• Analysis – Ability to break material down into its component parts and to understand its underlying structure – May require students to compare and contrast or explain how an example illustrates a given concept or principle. – Require students to identify logical errors or to differentiate among facts, opinions, assumptions, hypotheses and conclusions – Expected to draw relationships between ideas – Differentiate, estimate, infer, diagram
    • Bloom’s – Higher Levels• Synthesis – Opposite of Analysis – Ability to combine parts to form a new whole; to synthesize a variety of elements into an original and significant whole. – Produce something unique or original – Solve some unfamiliar problem in a unique way – Combine, create, formulate, construct
    • Bloom’s – Higher Levels• Evaluation – Ability to evaluate a total situation, to judge the value of material for a certain purpose, combining elements of all the other categories and also value judgments based on defined, fixed criteria. – The most important part of the answer is the justification and rationale for the conclusion – Judge, critique, justify, discriminate
    • Bloom’s – Higher Levels• Meaningful or deep learning• Go beyond textual material in that they must be inferred or extrapolated from the material in the assigned material.• Students’ creativity, originality and critical thinking is required at higher levels• More authentic than lower levels – Thinking at this level is more likely to represent types of performances required in the real world
    • Activity• Break into groups. You will each be assigned a level of Bloom’s taxonomy.• Develop an activity to teach the rest of us the topic on the next slide using techniques common to your assigned level in Blooms.• You have 5-7 minutes to prepare your lesson/activity, and then you will present it to the rest of us.
    • The Pledge of Allegiance
    • Theory Into Practice5 Questions for Instructional Design1. What do you want the student to be able to do? (Outcome)2. What does the student need to know in order to do this well? (Curriculum)3. What activity will facilitate the learning? (Pedagogy)4. How will the student demonstrate the learning? (Assessment)5. How will I know the student has done this well? (Criteria) ACRL’s IIL Immersion Summer 2005
    • 1. What do you want thestudent to be able to do?This question asks you to develop the outcome.For Example:Student identifies, consults and evaluates reference books appropriate to the topic in order to locate background information and statistics. ACRL’s IIL Immersion Summer 2005
    • Learning OutcomesFormula Verb Great Or + Why? = “In Order To” Learning Outcomes Action Phrase ORWhat students need Why do they need toto know? know this?“Student identifies, “In Order To” “locate backgroundconsults and evaluates information andreference books statistics.”appropriate to the topic” ACRL’s IIL Immersion Summer 2005
    • Characteristics of GoodLearning Outcomes• Measurable/Assessable• Clear to the student & instructor• Integrated, developmental, transferable• Use discipline-specific competencies/standards as a basis not an end• Similar scope and scale• “In order to” gets to the uniqueness and real world application of the learning• Use a variety of Bloom’s Taxonomy levels ACRL’s IIL Immersion Summer 2005
    • Example 1• Bad Outcome – Students will name the three types of rock in order to differentiate among the three.
    • Example 1• Good Learning Outcome – Students will compare and contrast the characteristics of the three types of rocks in order to differentiate among the three.
    • Example 2• Bad Learning Outcome – Discover that UT Arlington offers a welcoming and helpful environment which can fulfill their educational, cultural and social needs in order to recognize the university’s role in lifelong learning.
    • Example 3• Bad Outcome – Use Illiad and Texshare in order to access materials not available at UT Arlington Library.
    • Example 3• Good Outcome – Utilize retrieval services in order to obtain materials not owned by UT Arlington Library.
    • Last Example…I Promise• Bad Outcome – Students will construct bibliographies and in-text references using discipline appropriate styles in order to contribute to academic discourse in their discipline.
    • Last Example…I Promise• Good Outcome – Construct bibliographies and in-text references using discipline appropriate styles in order to correctly attribute others work and ideas.
    • Let’s Write a LearningOutcome• We’re taking a friend camping for the first time (not roughing it too much).• What do they need to know?
    • Let’s Write a LearningOutcome• We’ll concentrate on how to build a fire• Why do we want our friend to be able to properly build a fire?
    • Let’s Write a LearningOutcome• Now let’s write the learning outcome• What is our verb (use Bloom’s)?• Why?
    • Let’s Write an Assignment-Specific LearningOutcome• Pick a major theme or issue from The Kite Runner as the topic for your essay, discuss that topic using specific passages from the book, and relate that topic to at least one other context. For instance, you may relate the topic to one or more essays, to personal experience, and/or to a real-life situation. Explore the topic in depth by looking for conflicts, relationships between ideas, and differing points of view. Your submission must be 3-5 pages in length, double- spaced, using Times New Roman font and 1 inch margins. Use proper MLA style for documentation of your sources, including parenthetical in-text citations and a Works Cited page if you used outside sources.
    • Let’s Write an Assignment-Specific LearningOutcome• What does the student need to know?• Why do they need to know this?
    • Now the FUN Begins• You’ll need the information sheet you completed prior to the workshop• Group together similar items from your list of objectives• Use Bloom’s taxonomy and the learning outcomes formula to create learning outcomes that address your grouped objectives
    • A Look Into the Future5 Questions for Instructional Design1. What do you want the student to be able to do? (Outcome)2. What does the student need to know in order to do this well? (Curriculum)3. What activity will facilitate the learning? (Pedagogy)4. How will the student demonstrate the learning? (Assessment)5. How will I know the student has done this well? (Criteria)