Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Writing Effective Learning Outcomes

5,230 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

Writing Effective Learning Outcomes

  1. 1. Joe McVeigh NYSTESOL Melville, NY, USA October 29, 2011 Writing Effective Learning Outcomes
  2. 2. What is a learning outcome?
  3. 3. How do you use learning outcomes?
  4. 4. Definitions and underlying concepts <ul><li>An outcome is the desired result of the learning experience. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Definitions and underlying concepts Outcomes are the achieved results of what was learned. They are the evidence that learning has taken place. Outcomes are the abilities or products students have shown after instruction. Outcomes are what teachers will assess .
  6. 6. Definitions and underlying concepts A student learning outcome is “a specific statement that describes the knowledge, skills/abilities, or attitudes that students are expected to learn upon successful completion of a course of study, such as a course, seminar, or certification program.” (Wood, 2008)
  7. 7. Definitions and underlying concepts <ul><li>The backwards design process (Sweeney, 2008) </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding by Design (Wiggins & McTighe) </li></ul>
  8. 8. Contexts in which learning outcomes are used <ul><li>TESOL presentation evaluation rubric </li></ul>
  9. 9. TESOL presentation rubric The proposal abstract is well written and provides an explicit statement of participant outcomes and how they will be achieved. Excellent The proposal abstract is clearly written and provides a general statement of participant outcomes and how they will be achieved. Good The proposal abstract is adequately written and includes a statement of participant outcomes, but needs more detail Satisfactory The abstract gives some ideas about outcomes, but needs to specify how they will be reached during the presentation Fair The proposal abstract needs work on sentence structure and fails to give outcomes Poor Clarity of proposal and participant outcomes Evaluation criteria
  10. 10. Contexts in which learning outcomes are used <ul><li>U.S. state boards of education </li></ul>
  11. 11. Contexts in which learning outcomes are used <ul><li>Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: Learning, teaching, assessment </li></ul><ul><li>A1, A2, B1, B2, C1, C2 </li></ul><ul><li>Council of Europe CEFR “Can do” statements. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Can scan texts for relevant information and grasp main topic of text, reading almost as quickly as a native speaker.” </li></ul>
  12. 12. Contexts in which learning outcomes are used <ul><li>CEA standards for curriculum </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Course objectives are written, observable, and measurable . . .” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ The program or institution documents in writing whether students have attained the learning objectives for courses taken within the curriculum using instruments and procedures that appropriately assess . . . .” </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. What does a good student learning outcome look like? S M A R T tudent-centered easurable ction-oriented esults-driven ailored to specific programs
  14. 14. What does a good student learning outcome look like? Not too broad
  15. 15. What does a good student learning outcome look like? Not too narrow
  16. 16. Uses strong, clear, concrete verbs such as those found in Bloom’s Taxonomy. What does a good student learning outcome look like?
  17. 17. Knowledge <ul><li>define </li></ul><ul><li>describe </li></ul><ul><li>identify </li></ul><ul><li>list </li></ul><ul><li>outline </li></ul><ul><li>explain </li></ul><ul><li>generalize </li></ul><ul><li>give examples </li></ul><ul><li>infer </li></ul><ul><li>predict </li></ul><ul><li>summarize </li></ul><ul><li>paraphrase </li></ul>
  18. 18. Comprehension and application <ul><li>demonstrate </li></ul><ul><li>prepare </li></ul><ul><li>produce </li></ul><ul><li>rate </li></ul><ul><li>show </li></ul><ul><li>solve </li></ul><ul><li>use </li></ul>
  19. 19. Synthesis <ul><li>categorize </li></ul><ul><li>compare </li></ul><ul><li>conclude </li></ul><ul><li>design </li></ul><ul><li>explain </li></ul><ul><li>organize </li></ul><ul><li>plan </li></ul><ul><li>revise </li></ul><ul><li>support </li></ul>
  20. 20. What does a good student learning outcome look like? Uses parallel language
  21. 21. What does a good student learning outcome look like? <ul><li>Doesn’t mix verb tenses: choose either future or present and stick with it: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Students can . . . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>or </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students will be </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>able to . . . </li></ul></ul>
  22. 22. What does a good student learning outcome look like? <ul><li>Avoids this language: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Be familiar with . . . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gain an understanding of . . . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learn about . . . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Demonstrate knowledge of . . . </li></ul></ul><ul><li>(Wood 2008) </li></ul>
  23. 23. What does a good student learning outcome look like? Makes it clear: by when? End of course or program vs. beginning placement
  24. 24. What does a good student learning outcome look like? Make sure that the outcome is measurable.
  25. 25. How do we assess learning outcomes? <ul><li>Tests, quizzes, exams </li></ul><ul><li>Written work, oral presentations </li></ul><ul><li>Assignments </li></ul><ul><li>Portfolio assessment </li></ul><ul><li>What about class participation and effort? </li></ul>
  26. 26. Try your hand at writing effective learning outcomes <ul><li>You are teaching a basic cooking class to junior high students who have little or no previous cooking experience. One desired result of your course is to have students successfully prepare a plate of scrambled eggs. </li></ul><ul><li>Write one learning outcome that your course could include. Describe how you will measure or assess the outcome. </li></ul>
  27. 27. The process of developing learning outcomes <ul><li>Main stages of the process (Sweeney 2008) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify the desired results (Outcomes) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Determine acceptable evidence (Assessment process) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plan learning experiences and instruction </li></ul></ul>
  28. 28. <ul><li>The importance of process (Sweeney 2008) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify essential and valued student learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop common formative and summative assessments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Analyze current levels of achievement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Set achievement goals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Share and create lessons and strategies to improve </li></ul></ul>The process of developing learning outcomes
  29. 29. The process of developing learning outcomes Dealing with resistance
  30. 30. Questions
  31. 32. Photo Credits <ul><li>Some photos from flickr used under a Creative Commons Attribution license </li></ul><ul><li>Darts target Erika </li></ul><ul><li>Graduation photo Allan Chatto </li></ul><ul><li>Broad river Robert Taylor </li></ul><ul><li>Narrow passage David Merrigan </li></ul><ul><li>Butterfly collection Christian Guthier </li></ul><ul><li>Andromeda galaxy NASA </li></ul><ul><li>Railroad tracks Sean McGrath </li></ul><ul><li>Up-down arrows Cameron Russell </li></ul><ul><li>Avoidance barrier Horia Varlan </li></ul><ul><li>Calendar Jennifer Jayanthi Kumar </li></ul><ul><li>Angry child Mindaugass Danys </li></ul><ul><li>Question mark The Italian Voice </li></ul><ul><li>Thank you flowers Eduardo Deboni </li></ul>
  32. 33. Download copies of the handout and PowerPoint slides at www.joemcveigh.org/resources Thank you !

×