Play to Collect Data with Children at School
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TERENCE data gathering methods for its context of use analysis, constrained by time and space

TERENCE data gathering methods for its context of use analysis, constrained by time and space

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Play to Collect Data with Children at School Presentation Transcript

  • 1. T. Di Mascio UnivAQ Gamify your Field Studies for Learning about Your Learners R. Gennari, A. Melonio UniBZ http://www.terenceproject.eu
  • 2. Outline of this story Incipit Climax Resolution a  TEL  project  for  children and  its  context  of  use analysed  via  gami:ied  :ield  studies that  inform  design  decisions  
  • 3. Outline of this story Incipit Climax Resolution a  TEL  project  for  children and  its  context  of  use analysed  via  gami:ied  :ield  studies that  inform  design  decisions   T E R E N C E
  • 4. Outline of this story Incipit Climax Resolution a  TEL  project  for  children and  its  context  of  use analysed  via  gami:ied  :ield  studies that  inform  design  decisions  
  • 5. TERENCE  in  a  nutshell TERENCE  is  a  collabora/ve  FP7  project   ‣ for  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  (TEL) ‣ for  children  with  specific  text  comprehension   problems  and  their  educators ‣ for  developing  and  adap/ve  learning  system  that   recommends  its  learners  the  adequate  learning   material,  made  of  digital
  • 6. TERENCE  in  a  nutshell TERENCE  is  a  collabora/ve  FP7  project   ‣ for  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  (TEL) ‣ for  children  with  specific  text  comprehension   problems  and  their  educators ‣ for  developing  and  adap/ve  learning  system  that   recommends  its  learners  the  adequate  learning   material,  made  of  digital ‣ books  of  stories
  • 7. TERENCE  in  a  nutshell TERENCE  is  a  collabora/ve  FP7  project   ‣ for  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  (TEL) ‣ for  children  with  specific  text  comprehension   problems  and  their  educators ‣ for  developing  and  adap/ve  learning  system  that   recommends  its  learners  the  adequate  learning   material,  made  of  digital Who runs fast? ‣ books  of  stories ‣ and  smart  games  for  reasoning  about  stories
  • 8. TERENCE  in  a  nutshell TERENCE  is  a  collabora/ve  FP7  project   ‣ for  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  (TEL) ‣ for  children  with  specific  text  comprehension   problems  and  their  educators ‣ for  developing  and  adap/ve  learning  system  that   recommends  its  learners  the  adequate  learning   material,  made  of  digital ‣ How  do  we  design  the  TERENCE  learning  material  and  overall   system  so  as  to  be Who runs fast? ‣ books  of  stories ‣ and  smart  games  for  reasoning  about  stories
  • 9. TERENCE  in  a  nutshell TERENCE  is  a  collabora/ve  FP7  project   ‣ for  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  (TEL) ‣ for  children  with  specific  text  comprehension   problems  and  their  educators ‣ for  developing  and  adap/ve  learning  system  that   recommends  its  learners  the  adequate  learning   material,  made  of  digital ‣ How  do  we  design  the  TERENCE  learning  material  and  overall   system  so  as  to  be Who runs fast? ‣ books  of  stories ‣ and  smart  games  for  reasoning  about  stories ‣ usable  by  its  users
  • 10. TERENCE  in  a  nutshell TERENCE  is  a  collabora/ve  FP7  project   ‣ for  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  (TEL) ‣ for  children  with  specific  text  comprehension   problems  and  their  educators ‣ for  developing  and  adap/ve  learning  system  that   recommends  its  learners  the  adequate  learning   material,  made  of  digital ‣ How  do  we  design  the  TERENCE  learning  material  and  overall   system  so  as  to  be Who runs fast? ‣ books  of  stories ‣ and  smart  games  for  reasoning  about  stories ‣ and  effec>ve  for  them? ‣ usable  by  its  users
  • 11. Data  for  context  of  use  from  children start no release yesok? gather data specify requirements design develop evaluation
  • 12. Data  for  context  of  use  from  children start no release yesok? gather data specify requirements design develop evaluation 282  learners  in  Italy 226  learners  in  UK 30  school  educators 10  domain  experts
  • 13. Data  for  context  of  use  from  children start no release yesok? gather data specify requirements design develop evaluation 282  learners  in  Italy 226  learners  in  UK 30  school  educators 10  domain  experts how  to  do  that  with   so  many  young  learners  at   school?
  • 14. Outline of this story Incipit Climax Resolution a  TEL  project  for  children and  its  context  of  use analysed  via  gami:ied  :ield  studies that  inform  design  decisions  
  • 15. Challenges  in  collecGng  data  from  children Reliability  of  collected  data: ‣ children  might  become  anxious  at  the  thought  of  taking  a  test   (Rubin  1995)  and  hence  not  express  their  true  selves,   ‣ thus  direct  methods  should  be  avoided  (Druin  2010)
  • 16. Challenges  in  collecGng  data  from  children Reliability  of  collected  data: ‣ children  might  become  anxious  at  the  thought  of  taking  a  test   (Rubin  1995)  and  hence  not  express  their  true  selves,   ‣ thus  direct  methods  should  be  avoided  (Druin  2010) Drop-­‐outs  easily  occur  ‘cause  for  children  (Chiasson  and  Gutwin  2005) ‣ “mo>va>on  and  engagement  are  [...]  important” ‣ “children  [need]  to  see  the  results  of  their  ac>ons  immediately”
  • 17. Challenges  in  collecGng  data  from  children Reliability  of  collected  data: ‣ children  might  become  anxious  at  the  thought  of  taking  a  test   (Rubin  1995)  and  hence  not  express  their  true  selves,   ‣ thus  direct  methods  should  be  avoided  (Druin  2010) Drop-­‐outs  easily  occur  ‘cause  for  children  (Chiasson  and  Gutwin  2005) ‣ “mo>va>on  and  engagement  are  [...]  important” ‣ “children  [need]  to  see  the  results  of  their  ac>ons  immediately” School/environment  constraints:  ac>vi>es  should ‣ involve  an  en>re  class, ‣ respect  school  >me-­‐tables,  e.g.,  each  session  should  last  no  longer   than  2  hours
  • 18. Outline of this story Incipit Climax Resolution a  TEL  project  for  children and  its  context  of  use analysed  via  gami:ied  :ield  studies that  inform  design  decisions  
  • 19. What  we  did:  we  gamified  data  gathering GamificaGon  is  the  usage  of  game-­‐play  elements  in  a  non-­‐game  context   for  engaging  and  mo>va>ng  users,  e.g.,  in  ac>vi>es
  • 20. What  we  did:  we  gamified  data  gathering Reliability  of  collected  data ‣ can  be  achieved  if  children  get  engaged  in  diverse  progressive   challenges  for  diverse  skills GamificaGon  is  the  usage  of  game-­‐play  elements  in  a  non-­‐game  context   for  engaging  and  mo>va>ng  users,  e.g.,  in  ac>vi>es
  • 21. What  we  did:  we  gamified  data  gathering Reliability  of  collected  data ‣ can  be  achieved  if  children  get  engaged  in  diverse  progressive   challenges  for  diverse  skills GamificaGon  is  the  usage  of  game-­‐play  elements  in  a  non-­‐game  context   for  engaging  and  mo>va>ng  users,  e.g.,  in  ac>vi>es Drop-­‐outs ‣ can  be  avoided  via  >mely  usable  feedback  and  engagement
  • 22. What  we  did:  we  gamified  data  gathering Reliability  of  collected  data ‣ can  be  achieved  if  children  get  engaged  in  diverse  progressive   challenges  for  diverse  skills GamificaGon  is  the  usage  of  game-­‐play  elements  in  a  non-­‐game  context   for  engaging  and  mo>va>ng  users,  e.g.,  in  ac>vi>es Drop-­‐outs ‣ can  be  avoided  via  >mely  usable  feedback  and  engagement School/environment  constraints  require  we ‣ involve  all  children  in  social  ac>vi>es, ‣ a  linear  planning/storyline  and  engagement  for  mee>ng  >me-­‐tables
  • 23. What  we  did:  we  gamified  data  gathering Reliability  of  collected  data ‣ can  be  achieved  if  children  get  engaged  in  diverse  progressive   challenges  for  diverse  skills GamificaGon  is  the  usage  of  game-­‐play  elements  in  a  non-­‐game  context   for  engaging  and  mo>va>ng  users,  e.g.,  in  ac>vi>es Drop-­‐outs ‣ can  be  avoided  via  >mely  usable  feedback  and  engagement School/environment  constraints  require  we ‣ involve  all  children  in  social  ac>vi>es, ‣ a  linear  planning/storyline  and  engagement  for  mee>ng  >me-­‐tables
  • 24. What  we  did:  we  gamified  data  gathering Reliability  of  collected  data ‣ can  be  achieved  if  children  get  engaged  in  diverse  progressive   challenges  for  diverse  skills GamificaGon  is  the  usage  of  game-­‐play  elements  in  a  non-­‐game  context   for  engaging  and  mo>va>ng  users,  e.g.,  in  ac>vi>es ‣ But  which  gamifica9on  ‘model’,  i.e.,  what  of  game-­‐play  can  ensure  us   we  really  engage  our  learners  in  our  data  collec9on? Drop-­‐outs ‣ can  be  avoided  via  >mely  usable  feedback  and  engagement School/environment  constraints  require  we ‣ involve  all  children  in  social  ac>vi>es, ‣ a  linear  planning/storyline  and  engagement  for  mee>ng  >me-­‐tables
  • 25. Gamification: diverse views
  • 26. The  “video  game  uses  and  gratifications”  model  (Sherry  &   Lucas  2003)  says  that  different  players  engage  in  games  for   different  gratifications:   competition                      challenge            diversion            arousal            fantasy                                      social  interaction Gamification: diverse views
  • 27. Flows  are  engaging  activities  (e.g.,  games)  with  a  balance  between   challenges  and  skills,  and  for  (Kiili  2005)  are  realised  in  games  via: balanced  challenges  and  skills          timely  usable  feedback                  clear  goals                                                                           immersive  storylines                                                                                              intrinsic  rewards The  “video  game  uses  and  gratifications”  model  (Sherry  &   Lucas  2003)  says  that  different  players  engage  in  games  for   different  gratifications:   competition                      challenge            diversion            arousal            fantasy                                      social  interaction Gamification: diverse views
  • 28. The  motivational  model  (Przybylski  et  al.  2010)  explains  engagement  in   games  in  relation  to  the  satisfaction  of  universal  basic  needs: autonomy                                                  competence                                                        relatedness  needs Flows  are  engaging  activities  (e.g.,  games)  with  a  balance  between   challenges  and  skills,  and  for  (Kiili  2005)  are  realised  in  games  via: balanced  challenges  and  skills          timely  usable  feedback                  clear  goals                                                                           immersive  storylines                                                                                              intrinsic  rewards The  “video  game  uses  and  gratifications”  model  (Sherry  &   Lucas  2003)  says  that  different  players  engage  in  games  for   different  gratifications:   competition                      challenge            diversion            arousal            fantasy                                      social  interaction Gamification: diverse views
  • 29. Which  are  the  preferred  avatars?Which  are  the  preferred  avatars? Goals: describe  children’s  preferred  avatars Moves: cards  with  game  consoles  are  in  a   box;  in  turn,  each  player  picks  up  the   cards  of  the  consoles  the  player  uses   and  describes  her/his  preferred   avatars  for  the  consoles Feedback: a  moderator  assists,  and  provides   children  with  support  if  necessary   Gamified  data  gathering  1
  • 30. Which  are  the  preferred  avatars?Which  are  the  preferred  avatars? Autonomy: children  are  free  to  par/cipate,  to   say  what  they  wish Relatedness: each  learner  feels  part  of  the  class   by  telling  about  their  own   experiences Competence: verbal  skills Gamified  data  gathering  1
  • 31. Which  are  the  preferred  acGviGes?Which  are  the  preferred  acGviGes? Goals: describe  children’s  preferred   extracurricular  ac>vi>es Moves: each  learner  received  a  paper  sheet  with   s>ckers  represen>ng  ac>vi>es  (e.g.,   going  on  the  internet)  and  a  blank  sheet   with  3  empty  circles  represen>ng   morning,  aYernoon  and  evening.   Learners  have  to  paste  s>ckers  into  the   per>nent  circles  or  draw  ac>vi>es. Feedback: a  moderator  assists,  and  supports   children  if  necessary Gamified  data  gathering  2
  • 32. Which  are  the  preferred  acGviGes?Which  are  the  preferred  acGviGes? Autonomy: children  are  free  to  par>cipate  or  not,   to  a[ach  what  they  wish Relatedness: each  learner  feels  part  of  the  class  by   showing  the  class  their  own  choices Competence: non-­‐verbal  skills Gamified  data  gathering  2
  • 33. Morale: game over Pros: – reliable  and  dependable  data  for  creating  fine-­‐grained  learner  profiles  as   triangulated  with  data  from  domain  experts  or  referent  adults – gamifica>on  of  data  gathering  with  learners  was  engaging  for  children  and   their  teachers  to  the  point  that   – schools  par>cipated  in  the  prosecu>on  of  TERENCE  ac>vi>es  (“let’s   play  again”  effect) – there  were  no  drop-­‐outs – school  constraints  were  respected
  • 34. Morale: game over Pros: – reliable  and  dependable  data  for  creating  fine-­‐grained  learner  profiles  as   triangulated  with  data  from  domain  experts  or  referent  adults – gamifica>on  of  data  gathering  with  learners  was  engaging  for  children  and   their  teachers  to  the  point  that   – schools  par>cipated  in  the  prosecu>on  of  TERENCE  ac>vi>es  (“let’s   play  again”  effect) – there  were  no  drop-­‐outs – school  constraints  were  respected Contras: – considerable  resources  and  personnel  for  construc>ng  data  gathering   material  and  specifying  protocols/storyline – the  method  leads  to  collec>ng  poorly  structured  huge  diversified  data   which  requires  considerable  analysis  >mes
  • 35. Incipit TEL for children Climax with a challenging context of use Resolution analysed via gamified field studies End of story
  • 36. Incipit TEL for children Climax with a challenging context of use Resolution analysed via gamified field studies End of story ?