BGGD49 presentation - Norton by Symantec on online safety and mobile threats

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  • 1. Who are we?• Symantec is the 4th largest independent software company in the world• Norton blocks 120 threats per second• ... and over 3.7 billion threats per year• Symantec and Norton protect more than 370 million computers and e-mail accounts worldwide.• The world’s largest threat detection network Attack Activity Malware Intelligence Vulnerabilities Spam/Phishing o 240,000 sensors o 133M client, server, o 40,000+ vulnerabilities o 5M decoy accounts o 200+ countries gateways monitored o 14,000 vendors o 8B+ email messages/day o Global coverage o 105,000 technologies o 1B+ web requests/day
  • 2. NORTON ONLINE FAMILY REPORT 2011 INSIGHTS ABOUT ONLINE KIDS IN BELGIUMNorton Online Family Report 2011 3
  • 3. NORTON ONLINE FAMILY REPORT 201124 COUNTRIESAustralia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, NewZealand, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom, United States of America….plusBelgium, Denmark, Holland, Hong Kong, Mexico, South Africa, Singapore,Poland, Switzerland, United Arab Emirates811 INTERVIEWS IN BELGIUM507 adults (of which 104 parents) as well as 200 children & 104 teachersEXPERT COLLABORATORSJoseph LaBrie, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychology at Loyola Marymount UniversityVanessa Van Petten, Author, Radical Parenting CEO & YouthologistAdam Palmer, Norton Lead Cyber Security AdvisorMarian Merritt, Norton Internet Safety AdvocateNorton Online Family Report 2011 4
  • 4. KEY THEMES SHOPPING SCHOOLKIDS A third of the world’s kids shop online PARENTAL BLIND SPOTS Blind spots shrink as parents become savvy CYBER-SCHOOLS Home, school and online worlds merge DIGITAL HEAD LICE Having a kid = greater risk of viruses HOUSE RULES RULE! No house rules lead to negative experiencesNorton Online Family Report 2011 5
  • 5. SHOPPING SCHOOL KIDS THE SECRET SHOPPING LIVES OF OUR KIDS
  • 6. SHOPPING SCHOOL KIDS 22% Almost a quarter of children in Belgium are shopping online, 11% of whom sometimes shop without parental knowledgeNorton Online Family Report 2011 7
  • 7. SHOPPING SCHOOL KIDS What Parents Think Kids Do What Kids Say They Do 17% Shop Online 33%40% 37% Buy Music Online 34% 30% Buy Age-Appropriate Video Games 32% Buy Tickets (e.g. Concerts/Cinema) 28% 24% 25% Download Apps 16% 13% Buy Video Games for Older Players 9% 6% Buy Movies Unsuitable for their AgeNorton Online Family Report 2011 8
  • 8. PARENTAL BLIND SPOTS PARENTAL BLIND SPOTS
  • 9. PARENTAL BLIND SPOTS 5%of parents say they do not know what their children do online. But five times aschildren think their parents are ‘clueless’ and have no idea what they do online 9% 39% 1 in 10 kids admits to visiting adult content sites when their parents are not around 16% 4 in 10 kids say they sometimes stop what they are doing online if a parent is watching of parents suspect their child changes the way they act online when they are watching themNorton Online Family Report 2011 10
  • 10. PARENTAL BLIND SPOTS 5% / 28% Only 5% of parents say they do not know what their children do online. But five times as children (26%) think their parents are ‘clueless’ and have no idea what they do online 9% 39% 1 in 10 kids admits to visiting adult content sites when their parents are not around 16% / 50% of parents suspect their child changes the way they act 4 in 10 kids say they sometimes stop what they are doing online if a parent is watching online when they are watching themNorton Online Family Report 2011 11
  • 11. CYBERSCHOOLS CYBERSCHOOLS
  • 12. CYBERSCHOOLS The vast majority of teachers, kids and parents believe schools should integrate Internet technology as much as possible90% OF TEACHERS79% OF PARENTS78% OF CHILDREN
  • 13. CYBERSCHOOLSDIGITAL NATIVES EXPECT A DIGITAL EDUCATION73% A majority of kids think they get too little education at school about online safety56% Half of parents agree their child’s school should be doing more to educate children about online safety65% of teachers agree more online safety education is needed in schools
  • 14. CYBERSCHOOLSA JOINT RESPONSIBILITY? 85% of teachers believe that teaching Internet safety to children is a responsibility that should be shared with parents As compared to… 38% Of parents who believe that it should be a joint responsibility with teachers
  • 15. CYBERSCHOOLS1/10 1 IN 10 TEACHERS EXPERIENCED OR KNOW SOMEONE WHOEXPERIENCED CYBERBAITING 13 Norton Online Family Report 2011 16
  • 16. CYBERSCHOOLS 15% of teachers are friends with students on social networking sites 80% However, four fifths of teachers say being friends with students on social networking sites exposes them to risksNorton Online Family Report 2011 17
  • 17. DIGITAL HEAD LICE THANKS TO THEIR KIDS… PARENTS ARE A HIGHER RISK GROUP OF INTERNET USERS
  • 18. DIGITAL HEAD LICE Twice as many kids who use social networking 2 have experienced a negative online situation 19% 62% vs 48 % Adults who do not have children Of parents with children from ages 8 to 17 have been victim of a between the ages of 8 and 17 17% cybercrime 15% 80% Of parents whose children had vs 54 % Of parents whose children had not experienced a cybercrime also became experienced a cybercrime victims of a cybercrime
  • 19. DIGITAL HEAD LICETHE TOP FEARS OF PARENTS 48% Fear their kids will be exposed to indecent information 46% Fear their kids will give out too much personal information to strangers 43% Fear their kids are interacting with inappropriate people
  • 20. DIGITAL HEAD LICEBUT IN REALITY…. THE TOP THREE NEGATIVE EXPERIENCES 30% A child/teenager I don’t know tried to befriend me on a social network 26% I have seen violent images, videos or games online 24% I downloaded a virus to my/my family’s computer
  • 21. DIGITAL HEAD LICE 62% 58% 2010In the 14 tracking countries, 2011there have been a few verysmall, but encouraging,declines in the number of 33%children experiencing anegative online situation. 2010 23% 2010 2011 CHILDREN% 2011 NEGATIVE ONLINE DOWNLOADED EXPERIENCES (NET) A VIRUS
  • 22. HOUSE RULES RULE HOUSE RULES RULE
  • 23. HOUSE RULES RULE 48% 72% 82% Just under half of kids who Under three quarter of parents Four fifths of Internet house rule follow house rules have had a have rules for their kids’ use breakers have suffered a negative online experience of the Internet negative online experience TIME 46% Only half of parents have rules about how much time their kids can spend online 35% SAFE SITES Less than half of parents have house rules about safe websites 17% FAMILY SAFETY SOUTIONS Under a third of parents have set parental controls on the family computerNorton Online Family Report 2011 24
  • 24. CONCLUSIONPOSITIVE & SURPRISING FINDINGS WHAT PARENTS CAN DONORTON’S ON-GOING STUDY INTO CHILDREN’S LIVES ONLINE SHOWS Although not top of parents’ list of concerns, theTHAT PARENTS ARE BECOMING MORE AWARE OF WHAT THEIR incidence of computer viruses and malware is anCHILDREN ARE DOING ON THE INTERNET, WHILE THE NEW QUESTIONS area where parents can easily stamp out one of thePINPOINT SOME EMERGING ISSUES THAT PARENTS NEED TO PAY most prevalent online threats to their children.ATTENTION TO – MOST NOTABLY UNAUTHORIZED ONLINE SHOPPING Behavior and conversation play important rolesBY THEIR KIDS. too. Internet house rules are amazingly effective at minimizing risks. Keeping dialogue open isWhile it’s positive to see children’s negative crucial to help resolve issues, should they arise.online experiences are decreasing intracked countries, we have to remember allthe levels are still unacceptably high. CYBER-SCHOOLSWhat is surprising is the way parents – and It’s concerning that teachers are sufferingparticularly those with children who’ve negative experiences such as cyberbaiting,experienced something negative online – are but it’s encouraging to see so many are inat an increased risk of cybercrime themselves. favor of technology in education. FUTURE TRENDS The initial insights into mobile Internet and the issues related to highlighting the future trends we need to keep track of. Norton Online Family Report 2011 25
  • 25. Norton Online FamilyNorton Online Family Report 2011 26
  • 26. WE’RE GOING MOBILE!- Smartphone sales were expected to surpass 461million units by the end of 2011- Smartphone and tablet sales expected to surpass PCsales by 44% by the end of 2011- More than one billion smartphones will connect tothe Internet, compared to 1.3 billion computers- A marked increase in mobile threats
  • 27. AN INCREASINGLY MOBILE FUTURE 44% OF PEOPLE WITH A MOBILE PHONE USE THEIR DEVICE TO CONNECT TO THE INTERNET GLOBALLY 10% OF ADULTS ONLINE HAVE BEEN VICTIM OF A CYBCERIME ON THEIR MOBILE DEVICE 14% BELGIUM COMPARED TO 1% OF CONNECTED BELGIAN ADULTS
  • 28. AN INCREASINGLY MOBILE FUTURE 10%OF CYBER ATTACKS ONA WOLRDWIDE LEVELOCCUR ON A MOBILE DEVICE BUT ONLY… 3% 30% 1/3 OF BELGIANS DOWNLOAD APPLICATIONS FROM BELGIANS PROTECT THEIR MOBILE DEVICE WITH A BELGIUM TRUSTED SITES PASSWORD
  • 29. CYBERCRIMINALS ARE GOING « MOBILE »Example: Trojanized mobile applicationPeople forEthicalTreatment ofAnimals• The game “Dog Wars” was hacked and infected by PETA• After installation, the application sends a text to all the contacts in the address book of the infected smartphone• Signs up infected phone for SMS messages from PETA
  • 30. CYBERCRIMINALS ARE GOING « MOBILE »App used to steal Netflix user account information -A Trojan was released that looked very similar to the real Netflix for Android app. -The fake app was used to collect account information and send it to a remove server. - Demand for an Netflix app for Android is high, making a fake app like this particularly dangerous.
  • 31. QUESTIONS ?
  • 32. FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: @norton_be
  • 33. THE METHODOLOGY DETAILSTRATEGYONE CONDUCTED AN • The margin of error for the total sample of adults (n=12,704) is + 0.87% at the 95% level of confidence.ONLINE SURVEY AMONG: • The margin of error for the total sample of parents,• 12,704 ADULTS (including 2956 parents) defined as parents with children aged 8-17 who spend 1+ hour online per month (n=2,956) is + 1.8% at the 95% level• 4553 CHILDREN (aged 8 – 17) of confidence.• 2379 TEACHERS (of students aged 8 – 17) • The margin of error for the total sample of children (n=4,553) is + 1.45% at the 95% level of confidence.• TOTAL NUMBER OF INTERVIEWS: 19,636 The margin of error for the total sample of teachersThe survey was conducted in 24 countries (14 tracking (n=2,379) is + 2.0.% at the 95% level of confidence.countries: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany,India, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Spain, Sweden, United Important notes:Kingdom, United States; 10 new countries: Belgium,Denmark, Holland, Hong Kong, Mexico, South Africa, The global data has been weighted to ensure all countriesSingapore, Poland, Switzerland and UAE).* have equal representation. Adults to n500 (n100 parents), children to n200, teachers to n100.The survey was conducted in the primary language of eachcountry. * References to 2010 – 2011 data changes is based upon the 14 tracking markets only: Australia, Brazil,Questions asked were identical across all countries, with Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Newsome overlap between the adult/parent/teacher and youth Zealand, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom and the Unitedsurveys. States.Interviews were conducted between 6th February 2011 StrategyOne, international research agency.– 14th March 2011.Norton Online Family Report 2011 36