How To Write An Outline

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How To Write An Outline

  1. 1. How to Write an Outline <ul><li>Steps </li></ul><ul><li>Tips </li></ul><ul><li>Examples </li></ul>
  2. 2. What is an Outline? <ul><li>An outline is a great way to organize your thoughts as well as organize information from what you've read. It provides a brief, overall view to correlate and rearrange ideas. It can be useful to prepare a speech, essay or novel as well as a handy tool for memorization while studying. </li></ul>
  3. 3. STEPS : <ul><li>Decide upon a topic. </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Gather research material. </li></ul><ul><li>Obtain newspapers, magazines, books or helpful computer pages. </li></ul><ul><li>Obtain detailed material that will support a topic. </li></ul><ul><li>Decide upon a sentence, paragraph or chapter. Or gather ideas into sections.&quot; </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Organize your outline </li></ul><ul><li>Number major ideas in a consecutive, logical order. </li></ul><ul><li>Indent and alphabetize supportive ideas under each major idea. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Expand upon a point of view. Include examples. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use brief words or phrases rather than full sentences. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Choose concise, descriptive words. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Add smaller divisions, as needed. </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Decide upon your major ideas. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In a wikiHow article: Create an introduction, steps, tips, then warnings. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In study: Follow the course of a textbook. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In a novel: Create a rising action, climax, then resolution. </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Record information to support each major idea. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Eliminate irrelevant information. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Connect each major idea with a logical flow. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Create your final draft. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Tips: <ul><li>A sentenced outline may be more comprehensive. </li></ul><ul><li>Use as a memorization tool. Choose concise words to trigger a concept. </li></ul><ul><li>Use a computer. Many provide outline tools. It's quick to add, delete or rearrange information. </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Organize according to purpose to logically support a position: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To compare and contrast. Also include examples. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To present cause and effect. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To define or analyze a particular aspect. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To present one side of an argument or both. </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>To provide evidence and draw to a conclusion. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To present a problem, then provide a solution. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Towards the strongest point of view. </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Example: <ul><li>I.       A.       B.       C. II.       A.         1.         2.       B. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Quick Way to Start Strong <ul><li>- Topic Sentence (make it strong) </li></ul><ul><li>-Example </li></ul><ul><li>-Support </li></ul><ul><li>-Example </li></ul><ul><li>-Support </li></ul><ul><li>-Example </li></ul><ul><li>-Support </li></ul><ul><li>-Concluding statement </li></ul>

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