Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Syllable stress notes
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Syllable stress notes

469
views

Published on

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
469
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. SYLLABLE STRESS/WORD STRESS – LESSON 1 Mentor: Rachel PearsonWords are made up of syllables.A syllable is a part of a word with one vowel sound in it.A vowel sound is  Any of the vowels as in /æ/, /e/, /ɪ/, /ɒ/, and /ʌ/.  The schwa /ə/  A consonant that sounds like a vowel. For example, the letter y in the word twenty (twen/ty)  Diphthongs For example, a/bout, tou/rist /ɪə/ /eɪ/ /ʊə/ /ɔɪ/ /əʊ/ /eə/ /aɪ/ /aʊ/In syllable-timed languages, like Bahasa Malayu, each syllable takes roughly thesame amount of time to speak. You can say that all syllables are spoken at thesame pitch and are the same length.English is completely different. English is a stress timed Language, this means thatthe stressed syllables are said at approximately regular intervals, and unstressedsyllables are shortened to fit this rhythm.Within individual words we have a “stressed” syllable, or a louder, longer syllable,and “unstressed” or “weak” syllables.The same applies within sentences, in sentences some words are stressed andothers are not stressed.