Marinduque Oxfam Australia Photos
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Marinduque Oxfam Australia Photos

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Marinduque Oxfam Australia Photos

Marinduque Oxfam Australia Photos

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  • NO TO MINING IN PALAWAN and other Key Biodiversity Areas, Natural Forests, Island Ecosystems, Critical Watersheds and Agricultural Areas!
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  • Ang yaman ng Palawan ay yaman ng Pilipinas It is known as the Philippines’ Last Ecological Frontier. It has 40% of our country’s remaining mangrove areas, 30% of our coral reefs, at least 17 Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs), 2 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, and 8 declared Protected Areas (PAs). It is unmatched anywhere in the country
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    Marinduque Oxfam Australia Photos Marinduque Oxfam Australia Photos Presentation Transcript

    • Marinduque
    • The Tapian Pit, Marcopper mine on Marinduque Island in the Philippines in 1989 Photograph by Catherine Coumans/MiningWatch Canada Slide 1
    • Pipes from the Marcopper mine pumping mine waste tailings into Calancan Bay at surface level in 1989 Photograph by Catherine Coumans/MiningWatch Canada Slide 2
    • Fishermen pass the seven kilometre long causeway of mine tailings dumped from Marcopper mine into Calancan Bay Photograph by David Slide 3 Sproule/Oxfam Australia
    • Joel (8) and Edilon (6) Frondoza at Botilao, Calancan Bay, where locals fear that the fish they eat is contaminated with heavy metals from mine waste dumped into the bay Slide 4
    • Students at Botilao School, Calancan Bay, where lead levels in the air were found to be double the Philippines Environmental Protection Agency’s standard Photograph by David Sproule/Oxfam Australia Slide 5
    • Eleven year old Michael Permjo with his playmate, Jay Villaruel, bothfrom Calancan Bay. The sores on Michael’s legs are commonplace – local people attribute them to heavy metal poisoning Slide 6
    • Seven year old Jason Peregrn with his mother Rosalina at the health centre at Calancan Bay Photograph by David Sproule/ Oxfam Australia Slide 7
    • Wilson Manuba, with his family. This Calancan Bay fisherman had his leg amputated due to arsenic poisoningPhotograph by David Sproule/Oxfam Slide 8 Australia
    • Illness spans generations: Wilson Manuba and his father Pedro – both Calancan Bay fishermen are suffering from severe arsenic poisoning Photograph by Ingrid Macdonald/Oxfam Australia Slide 9
    • Sonny Boy Mataya from Bocboc, Mogpog stands in front of millions of tonnes of mine waste that sit above the Maguila-Guila dam on the Mogpog River. The dam has been poorly maintained and locals live in fear of a repeat disasterPhotograph by Ingrid Macdonald/ Slide 10
    • Two of Marites Tagle’s daughters were killed when the Maguila-Guila dam collapsed, sending tonnes of toxic silt down the Mogpog River Photograph by Ingrid Macdonald/ Slide 11 Oxfam Australia
    • A local man living downstream on the Mogpog River points to mine tailings that have covered his fields since the Maguila- Guila dam collapse in 1993Photograph by Ingrid Macdonald/ Slide 12
    • The Mogpog River, Marinduque Island. The red/orange colour and Oxfam’s scientific studies indicate acid mine drainage and contamination by heavy metals Photograph by David Sproule/Oxfam Australia Slide 13
    • “They don’t hurt as much now, but still there is pain.” Tomas Gutierrez (82) displays his scarred legs from his bed at home in Malusak, Mogpog. He blames his continualskin diseases and health problems on pollution from the 1993 Mogpog River dam collapse Photograph by David Sproule/Oxfam Australia Slide 14
    • This woman crosses the Mogpog River every day. She says that her rash is caused by pollution in the river Photograph by David Sproule/Oxfam Australia Slide 15
    • Bags of mine waste tailings decomposing in the bright green/blue Boac River in March 2004 Photograph by Ingrid Macdonald/Oxfam Australia Slide 16
    • Animals drink water from the Boac River – local people say the river is contaminated with toxic mine waste Photograph by Ingrid Macdonald/ Slide 17
    • Bags full of contaminated tailings waste away on the banks of the Boac River – home to hundreds of people Photograph by David Sproule/Oxfam Australia Slide 18
    • Eliza Hernandez washes clothes at Barangay Balingbing, in the Boac RiverShe blames the rashes and sores on her body on contamination from the Boac disaster Slide 19 Photograph by David Sproule/Oxfam
    • Slide 20