New Voices and Civic Technology - Open Government for All?

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New Voices and Civic Technology - Open Government for All?

  1. 1.      6:30 - Mingle 6:40 - Welcome and Introductions 7:10 - New Voices - Numbers and Action Steven Clift, E-Democracy.org 7:35 – Break, Refreshments 7:45 - Impact Questions - Small Groups  7 min, 8 min report back  8:00 - New Voices Brainstorm - Projects, Apps, Data
  2. 2.   20 years of experience “interacting’ online within and “around” government, 30 countries World’s first election info website – E-Democracy
  3. 3.  3rd most individually net connected state today     Early pioneer in computing, wiped out by PCs Invented in indoor shopping mall in 1956 Post-It notes invented by 3M (MN Mining and Manufacturing) Net helped former pro-wrestler become Gov in 98
  4. 4.  E-Democracy.org's mission:  Harness the power of online tools to support participation in public life, strengthen communities, and build democracy.  Creating online spaces for civic engagement since 1994.
  5. 5.  Name  City  Organisation  Big question or brief thought
  6. 6.  This presentation contains a collection of statistics from various studies produced by the Pew Internet and American Life Project. The key study is here.  Also, other than blue and white graph on slide 20, the graphs contained were produced using Pew data. With the help of volunteers, I am seeking to present this data in additional ways.  My call for similar UK survey research brought back limited material.  Further notes and analysis (a mix of raw materials)  My “inclusion” analysis/summary  DC, San Francisco event notes and links  Help visualizing data, raw Google doc  New Voices – Proposed online working group
  7. 7.  PewInternet.org 2012 Numbers:  81% Overall Online - For United States ▪ 84% White, 73% Black, 74% Latino, <30K still at 67%  Least connected ▪ No High School Diploma - 51% ▪ Over 65 - 54%  Where? ▪ At Home - 65% Broadband, 4% Dial-up ▪ 12% Other - Work/School/Library/Mobile-only(?)
  8. 8.  72% of Adult Internet Users – United States 2013 (up from 67% in 2012) ▪ 74% Women, 70% Men (up from 63%) ▪ Facebook on slight decline among younger users  18% use Twitter (up from 16% in 2012) ▪ News and politics types, teen use outside eyes of parents using aliases ▪ May 2013: http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2013/socialnetworking-sites.aspx
  9. 9.  88% use Email overall - 58% Typical day  67% use SNS -  67% visit local/st/fed gov web - 13% Typ day  Lessons to Gov: 48% day , 8% Twitter ▪ Map out where to reach people and DON’T replace email newsletter with Facebook or Twitter (they are supplements) ▪ Reach people where they are online ▪ IMHO: Don’t drop print communication if you can afford to keep
  10. 10.     Those who already show up offline, showing up online. Lots of people talk politics offline, but more polarized online Participation gap even worse with fewer lower income, minorities doing “civic communication” or taking action online Clift analysis and links to Pew’s 2013 “Civic Engagement in the Digital Age Report”: http://bit.ly/pewcivic
  11. 11. Q15: % Men Vs. Women Saying They Discuss Politics ONLINE: Q14: % Men Vs. Women Saying They Discuss Politics: 0 20 40 60 80 100 0 17.3 60 Every day 15.6 5.7 31 At least once a week 13.2 At least once a week 25 13.4 17.7 12.2 At least once a month 19.1 Less than once a month 40 5.6 Every day At least once a month 20 12 13.5 12.9 Less than once a month 15.3 12.1 56.1 19.4 Never Never 56.5 24.5 Male Female Male Female 80 100
  12. 12. Q14: How Often Do You Discuss Politics, By Ideology 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 31.7 16.2 12.9 17.2 Every day 26.2 30.6 29.8 28.8 29.4 30.3 At least once a week 13.3 20.1 19.9 18.6 15.6 At least once a month 10.6 14.9 14.5 16.4 Less than once a month 5.7 13.3 Never 18.3 23.8 17.5 21.3 Very conservative Conservative Moderate Liberal Very liberal Source 2013: http://bit.ly/pewcivicreport
  13. 13. Q15: How Often Do You Discuss Politics ONLINE, By Ideology 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 14.6 Every day 5.2 3.7 3.4 17.4 18.5 15.1 At least once a week 11.1 13.9 19.3 6 At least once a month Less than once a month 14.4 11.3 14.6 15.6 10.6 11.6 13.1 16.1 11 50.3 53.5 Never 60.8 51.7 36.7 Very conservative Conservative Moderate Liberal Very liberal Source 2013: http://bit.ly/pewcivicreport
  14. 14. 2013 Pew Civic Engagement in Digital Age Report – Analysis: bitly.com/pewcivic     More equity in discussing politics via social networking Not so with taking action, contacting elected officials, media IMHO: Neighborhoods are “public life” gateway to action
  15. 15. SNS2: Of Those Using SNS, % Engaged in Various Political Activities, By Race / Ethnicity 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Asian, Pacific Islander Hispanic 27.2 27.7 SNS2a. Post links to stories 29.3 21.30 32.4 29.6 SNS2b. Post your own thoughts 31.7 25.00 31.6 30.8 SNS2c. Encourage people to take action? 14.6 26.50 34.3 40.3 SNS2d. Encourage people to vote 17.1 28.70 32.9 29.6 SNS2e. Repost political content*** 26.8 25.70 White African-American 70 80 90
  16. 16.  SNS Users - c. Encourage other people to take action on a political or social issue that is important to you - Of the 31% who say yes, very little variation across ALL demographics  SNS3b. And in the last 12 months, has there been a time when you decided to TAKE ACTION involving a political or social issue because of something you read on these sites? Race and Education show greatest gaps - Not income.  White 20%, Black 12%, Latino 11%, LTHS 12%, HS GD 13%, SmCol 19%, ColGd 23% Households 30-49K highest at 23%  
  17. 17.  ASKED TO TAKE ACTION - work for a candidate, give money to a cause, go to a meeting, or get in touch with a public official. Source 2013: http://bit.ly/pewcivicreport Q17a. Email  Overall Net User Yes - 36% - White 41%, Black 31%, Latino 19%,  LTHS 18%, HS GD 25%, SmCol 38%, ColGd 51%  Households 75K highest at 53% Q17b. Telephone  Overall All Adults Yes - 38% - White 40%, Black 32%, Latino 18%,  LTHS 18%, HS GD 32%, SmCol 37%, ColGd 45%  Households 75K highest at 53% Q17c. Letter  Overall All Adults Yes - 43% - White 49%, Black 39%, Latino 20%,  LTHS 21%, HS GD 38%, SmCol 45%, ColGd 57%  Households 75K highest at 58%
  18. 18. 27% of adult Net users (22% overall) use “digital tools to talk to their neighbors and keep informed about community issues.”  74% of those who talk digitally with their neighbors have talked face-to-face about community issues with their neighbors compared to 46% overall  Source: Neighbors Online study from PewInternet.org, 2010
  19. 19.  Neighborhood E-Lists/Forums – 7% Overall  Of 22% of ALL adults who “talk digitally with neighbors”: Only 12% under 30K, Over 75K 39%  Source: Neighbors Online study from PewInternet.org, 2010
  20. 20.  April 2010 report further reports:  21% who feel government posting on Facebook, Twitter very important:  17% Whites  31% African-American  33% Hispanic  18% College Educated  30% W/O High School Degree
  21. 21.  Responding to the democratic divide digitally requires moving beyond those who most easily show up  E-Democracy is reaching mass community participation by inclusively starting at the neighborhood level, 30% of households in some areas  In-depth lessons and presentations:  http://e-democracy.org/learn
  22. 22.  “Local” online public places to:  share information, events, ideas  discuss local community issues  gather diverse people in an open place  take action and promote solutions  Powered by two-way group communication  Over 50 neighbors/community forums in 18 communities across 3 countries today
  23. 23. Neighbor #1 City Hall Your Networks N E I G H B O R S Join the Forum In-person Conversations Neighbors Forum Online Local Media Coverage Local Biz Shared on Facebook
  24. 24.  46% People of Color  17% Foreign Born  Lower income areas, renters, etc.
  25. 25. 36
  26. 26. 38
  27. 27. Public outreach  http://beneighbors.org Webinars, training:  http://e-democracy.org/learn  http://e-democracy.org/practice
  28. 28.      6:30 - Mingle 6:40 - Welcome and Introductions 7:10 - New Voices - Numbers and Action Steven Clift, E-Democracy.org 7:35 – Break, Refreshments 7:45 - Impact Questions - Small Groups  7 min, 8 min report back  8:00 - New Voices Brainstorm - Projects, Apps, Data
  29. 29.  Impact/Research Question:  Actionable knowledge on greater, more representative use of civic tech/open gov. ▪ Small Groups – 2-3 people ▪ What do we really need to know? ▪ What numbers/baseline will empower civic tech/open gov practitioners to take action? Motivate donors.  Example: How do U.S. states compare in terms e-government services use by income or race/ethnicity?  Follow-up/Impact: Determine which states are reaching more harder to reach people beyond what is expected for their median income. And investigate why. Motivate states to increase e-government outreach.
  30. 30.  Brainstorm a civic tech or open government project/app/dataset/etc. which would:  Either generate more equitable democratic or community mass participation  Or something that would help raise the voices of a less represented community
  31. 31.  E-Democracy.org  Blog.e-democracy.org - dowire.org  @edemo  e-democracy.org/contact  Steven Clift  clift@e-democracy.org  StevenClift.com  @democracy 44

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