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Borowski   hnrs 177 final blog compilation
Borowski   hnrs 177 final blog compilation
Borowski   hnrs 177 final blog compilation
Borowski   hnrs 177 final blog compilation
Borowski   hnrs 177 final blog compilation
Borowski   hnrs 177 final blog compilation
Borowski   hnrs 177 final blog compilation
Borowski   hnrs 177 final blog compilation
Borowski   hnrs 177 final blog compilation
Borowski   hnrs 177 final blog compilation
Borowski   hnrs 177 final blog compilation
Borowski   hnrs 177 final blog compilation
Borowski   hnrs 177 final blog compilation
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Borowski hnrs 177 final blog compilation

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  • 1. HNRS
177
FINAL
BLOG
COMPILATION
RACHEL
BOROWSKI
ID:
803679215
Professor:
Victoria
Vesna
 HNRS
177
Assignment
#1
Wow!
The
videos
and
reading
articles
on
the
topic
of
the
“Third
Culture”
were
fascinating!
I
will
begin
with
an
overview
of
what
I
understood
and
enjoyed
most
from
the
given
materials,
and
then
provide
an
analysis
and
extrapolation
based
upon
my
own
experiences.
However,
I
first
state
that
I
am
a
Sociology
major.
But
I
spent
my
first
two
years
at
UCLA
as
an
International
Economics
student,
before
the
major
was
cut
(due
to
UC
budget
cuts)
in
the
summer
of
2010.

I
first
read
Professor
Vesna’s
article
“Toward
a
Third
Culture,”
which
was
nicely
complemented
and
somewhat
summarized
by
Lecture
#1.
Both
covered
the
history
of
this
theory,
with
arguments
by
C.P.
Snow,
Alduous
Huxley,
John
Brockman,
and
others.
These
were
very
informative,
but
I
was
ultimately
most
inspired
by
Vesna’s
argument
that
artists
currently
have
the
role
of
bridging
the
arts
and
sciences.
This
is
an
 interesting
idea
that
somewhat
reflects
 Brockman’s
idea
that
contemporary
 people
(although
he
says,
contemporary
 scientists)
are
the
third
culture
already,
 so
there
is
no
need
to
create
a
 middleman.

Vesna
states
that
although
 they
are
in
a
somewhat
precarious
 position
–
“Artists
using
technology
are
 uniquely
positioned
in
the
middle
of
the
 scientific
and
literary/philosophical
 communities
and
are
allowed
poetic
 license,
which
gives
us
the
freedom
to
 reinforce
the
delicate
bridge
and
indeed
 contribute
to
the
creation
of
a
new,
 mutant
third
culture.”
This
is
a
great
 point,
and
something
very
exciting
for
 the
future
of
art.
On
our
campus,
it
is
true
that
the
arts
and
sciences
(and
the
humanities,
too)
are
indeed
separated
both
in
our
minds
and
physically
in
the
arrangement
of
our
departments.

And
there
are
definitely
stereotypes
held
by
each
group,
along
with
feelings
of
superiority
in
some
form.
North
Campus
sees
South
Campus
as
a
bleak,
cement
region
for
socially
awkward
and
overly
intense
students.
Where
South
Campus
students
sees
North
Campus
as
a
place
for
jocks
and
sorority
girls
who
do
nothing
blab
about
their

  • 2. emotions
and
opinions
(see
Santa
image
below).
In
doing
this
exercise,
however,
I
found
it
most
interesting
to
note
that
neither
of
us
(humanities
or
the
hard
sciences)
include
Art
majors
as
“one
of
us.”
And
that,
I
believe,
is
because
our
university
has
(for
some
reason
or
another)
put
them
into
a
school
of
their
own.

 
In
the
RSAnimate
clip,
the
artist
discussed
the
creation
of
public
education
systems,
and
why
these
systems
(full
of
separate
subjects
and
cohorts)
are
not
an
appropriate
or
effective
model
for
teaching/learning
in
the
present
day.
This
intrigued
me,
as
I
realized
that
my
favorite
classes
in
college
have
all
been
my
honors
classes.
These
are
not
merely
“harder”
classes,
as
they
were
in
high
school.
But
they
are
small,
interdisciplinary
classes
with
lots
of
new,
interesting
ideas
and
a
great
deal
of
group
discussion
and
collaboration.
No
wonder
these
classes
had
my
attention
–
I
was
“firing
on
all
cylinders,”
so
to
speak.
I
think
the
Honors
Program
is
on
to
something!
Some
of
my
previous
honors
classes
were
incredibly
interesting:
a
combo
of
statistics
and
public
health,
a
combination
of
linguistics
and
neuroscience,
and
many
more!
I
agree
with
RSAnimate
that
kids
(and
young
men/women
like
us)
learn
best
not
by
“anesthesia”
(such
as
ADHD
medication)
but
by
being
“woken
up!”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

  • 3. 



Works
Cited:
http://www.someecards.com/college‐cards/college‐final‐exams‐santa‐claus‐funny‐ecard
http://www.badassoftheweek.com/davinci1.jpg
http://blogmarketing.typepad.com/.a/6a010534998f56970b015431f4ab4e970c‐pi


 HNRS
177
Assignment
#2
 This
topic
is
very
near
and
dear
to
me.
From
the
age
of
15
until
the
age
of
19,
I
lived
with
chronic
stomach
pain,
nausea,
migraines,
and
fatigue.
Several
doctors,
including
a
gastrointestinal
specialist,
couldn’t
figure
out
what
was
wrong,
so
I
spent
the
majority
of
those
four
year
on
a
variety
of
medications
for
ulcers,
intestinal
spasms,
and
other
digestive
disorders.
It
turns
out,
however,
that
none
of
these
were
the
problem.
After
my
mom
was
diagnosed
with
a
dairy
allergy,
her
doctor
and
nutritionist
decided
to
give
me
a
blood
test
that
measures
allergic
reactions
(on
a
scale
of
1‐6)
to
the
100
most
common
American
foods.
My
results
were
unlike
anything
they
had
ever
seen.
Of
the
100
foods,
I
ranked
at
a
6
for
nearly
40
of
them.
I
was
almost
allergic
to
everything
I
ate
on
a
daily
basis:
gluten,
dairy,
eggs,
red
meat,
peanuts,
almonds,
bananas,
pineapple,
vanilla,
etc.
Since
then,
my
life
has
been
entirely
different.
I
have
not
eaten
at
a
fast
food
restaurant
in
two
years.
When
my
friends
go
out
for
ice
cream
or
pizookies
or
pizza,
I
just
tag
along
to
hang
out
because
there
is
nothing
I
can
eat.
Before
going
on
weekend
trips
or
even
just
to
campus
for
the
day,
I
must
load
up
my
backpack
with
all
of
my
 special
foods
from
Trader
Joes
and
Whole
 Foods.
An
average
day
of
eating
looks
like
 this:
turkey
sausage,
blueberries,
soy
yogurt,
 Chex
cereal
in
a
bag,
cashews,
salad,
and
then
 gluten
free
pasta
for
dinner.
Despite
the
 annoyances
of
this
diet
(and
craving
things
 like
donuts
all
the
time),
I
cannot
even
begin
 to
imagine
the
health
benefits
(especially
 compared
to
my
childhood
diet,
which
 consisted
of
fast
food
at
least
once
a
day
and

  • 4. lots
of
pop‐tarts,
sugary
cereals,
and
store‐bought
cookies).


 In
fact,
my
diet
is
extremely
similar
to
the
Paleo
Diet.
For
those
who
haven’t
heard
of
it,
here’s
a
brief
description:
“The
Paleo
diet
is
the
healthiest
way
you
can
eat
because
it
is
the
ONLY
nutritional
approach
that
works
with
your
genetics
to
help
you
stay
lean,
strong
and
energetic!
Research
in
Biology,
Biochemistry,
Ophthalmology,
Dermatology
and
many
other
disciplines
indicate
it
is
our
modern
diet,
full
of
refined
foods,
trans
fats
and
sugar,
that
is
at
the
root
of
degenerative
diseases
such
as
obesity,
cancer,
diabetes,
heart
disease,
Parkinson’s,
Alzheimer’s,
depression
and
infertility”
(robbwolf.com).

People
who
follow
this
diet
do
not
consume
any
grains,
dairy,
refined
sugars,
etc.
And
after
several
years
with
a
nutritionist
and
several
allergy
books,
I
think
I
can
explain
the
reasoning
quite
well.
30,000
years
ago,
the
human
being
as
we
know
it
came
to
be.
He
lived
off
of
nuts,
berries,
seeds,
and
meats.
But
10,000
years
ago,
the
human
population
grew
too
large,
and
agriculture
was
necessary
to
feed
everyone.
Humans
began
to
cultivate
grains
and
consume
large
amounts
of
dairy
…
but
their
bodies
were
not
meant
for
these
types
of
food.
In
fact,
some
people
still
cannot
eat
these
foods
(ie
many
people
in
Asian
countries
where
dairy
wasn’t
introduced
until
quite
recently).
But
even
for
those
who
“can,”
there
are
many
negative
health
outcomes
including
inflammation,
acne,
unbalanced
energy
(and
blood
sugar)
levels
throughout
the
day,
excess
weight
gain,
gas,
and
even
irregular
sleep
patterns.
Sound
like
any
problems
you’re
having?
Probably,
yes.

 However,
this
can’t
be
the
only
reason
for
the
rise
in
food
allergies
and
intolerances
across
the
globe.
In
fact,
we’ve
seen
a
great
spike
since
the
introduction
of
genetically
modified
foods.
From
1997
to
2007,
the
prevalence
of
food
allergies
increased
18%,
and
allergy‐related
emergencies
requiring
ambulatory
care
and
hospitalization
nearly
tripled
(Branum
&
Lukacs
1549).

And
despite
all
of
the
potentially
incredible
benefits
of
GMOs
(herbicide/pest/disease/cold
resistance
so
there
will
be
enough
food
for
all)
and
nanofoods
(with
extra
nutrients
and
flavors),
I

  • 5. believe
that
we
should
be
wary
of
them
until
more
is
known
about
their
affects
on
the
body,
the
environment,
and
economies
across
the
globe.
In
addition,
I
feel
that
all
genetically
modified
foods
and
nanofoods
in
the
U.S.
should
be
labeled
in
the
meantime
so
that
consumers
can
be
aware
of
what
they
are
eating.




Works
Cited:
http://robbwolf.com/what‐is‐the‐paleo‐diet/
http://nerdfitness.com/blog/2010/10/04/the‐beginners‐guide‐to‐the‐paleo‐diet/
Branum,
Amy
M.,
and
Susan
L.
Lukacs.
"Food
Allergy
Among
Children
in
the
United
 States."
Pediatrics
124.6
(2009):
1549‐555.
Print.

http://nanotechnology174.wordpress.com/
http://www.fao.org/english/newsroom/focus/2003/gmo7.htm

 HNRS
177
Homework
#3
 Genetic
engineering
is
a
way
to
transfer
desirable
traits
from
one
organism
to
another
using
recombinant
DNA
technology.
Because
all
DNA
is
made
from
the
same
four
bases
(adenine,
guanine,
cytosine,
and
thymine),
we
can
transfer
genes
among
animals,
plants,
and
even
microbes.

For
example,
you
might
remember
our
discussion
last
week
about
the
introduction
of
antifreeze
DNA
from
fish
into
the
genome
of
tomatoes
to
make
them
hardier
in
cold
weather.
 In
2009,
the
FDA
issued
a
guide
for
the
agriculture
industry
regarding
the
regulation
of
genetically
engineered
animals.

This
guide
explains
the
federal
regulation
of
these
animals,
and
also
provides
recommendations
to
help
producers
meet
their
“obligations
and
responsibilities
under
the
law.”
However,
it
has
been
publicly
published
to
also
help
the
general
public
gain
a
better
understanding
of
this
proliferating
science.
In
their
online
Q&A
sheet,
this
is
how
the
FDA
describes
the
three
major
purposes
of
GMOs:
  Biopharm
Purposes:
Genetically
engineered
animals
are
intended
to
 produce
substances
(generally
in
their
milk
or
blood)
that
can
be
used
in
the
 production
of
human
or
animal
pharmaceuticals
  Transplant
Purposes:
Genetically
engineered
animals
serve
as
a
source
of
 scarce
cells,
tissues,
and
organs
for
transplantation
into
humans
(this
is
 known
as
xenotransplantation)

  • 6.  Food
Sources:
Genetically
engineered
animals
intended
for
human
 consumption
may
be
developed
to
be
disease
resistant
or
to
have
improved
 nutritional
qualities

 Although
all
of
these
reasons
seem
very
beneficial,
they
(and
especially
the
third
bullet)
have
raised
a
great
deal
of
controversy.
And
I
would
say
that
the
third
bullet
makes
me
wary
as
well.
The
primary
reason
for
this
(actually
noted
by
“Hope”
in
Strange
Culture)
is
the
fact
that
GM
foods
in
the
U.S.
are
not
labeled,
while
they
are
in
other
countries.
I
would
feel
much
more
comfortable
with
the
idea
of
GMOs
if
I
actually
knew
when
and
where
I
was
consuming
them.

 To
provide
a
brief
analysis
of
Strange
Culture,
I’d
have
to
say
that
Kurtz
and
his
work
originally
seemed
extremely
strange
to
me.

However,
within
ten
or
twenty
minutes
I
was
completely
on
his
side.
To
see
someone
lose
his
wife
and
his
career
and
his
most
basic
rights
within
a
span
of
a
few
hours
was
devastating.
At
first,
the
confusion
of
the
FBI
was
understandable.
But
I
believe
that
they
felt
too
ashamed
to
take
back
their
decisions,
and
had
to
continue
digging
for
any
form
of
evidence
–
even
down
to
some
Arabic
writing
on
an
invitation
to
an
exhibit
at
MASS
MoMA.
In
the
process,
they
destroyed
his
home
and
his
reputation.
But
I
respect
how
hard
such
a
broken
man
was
able
to
fight
back,
not
just
for
himself,
but
also
for
the
field
of
art/science
that
he
believes
to
be
so
important
and
impactful.
 

  • 7. 
 
http://www.fda.gov/animalveterinary/developmentapprovalprocess/geneticengineering/geneticallyengineeredanimals/default.htm
http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/GeneticEngineering/GeneticallyEngineeredAnimals/ucm113605.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetic_engineering
http://www.chm.bris.ac.uk/motm/dna/dna.htm
http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/exchange/node/4935

Borowski,
Rachel
HNRS
177
29
April
2012
 Homework
Assignment
#4

  • 8. 
 I
loved
Noa
Kaplan’s
art,
especially
her
large‐scale
representations
of
coffee,
sugar,
dust
bunnies,
and
pollen.
In
my
mind,
these
did
exactly
what
she
had
hoped
–
to
“re‐enchant
things
we
take
for
granted”
and
make
them
on
a
massive
scale
so
that
we
can
actually
interact
with
them.

I
greatly
admire
the
time
she
puts
into
her
work,
and
cannot
imagine
having
as
much
patience
as
she
seems
to
possess.
She
does
extraordinary
amounts
of
research
to
study
all
aspects
of
her
work
(physical
structure,
social
implications,
etc.)
and
then
spends
months
to
actually
create
each
piece.
I
like
to
hear
about
art
with
a
background
story
like
this,
because
it
makes
it
much
easier
for
me
to
understand.
Having
little
formal
instruction
in
art,
I
tend
to
understand
and
appreciate
artwork
much
more
when
its
abstractions
are
explained
to
me
from
a
perspective
of
purpose
and
intelligence.

 From
here,
I
began
to
research
people
and
places
that
were
studying
medicine
and
art
together.
One
of
the
first
people
to
catch
my
eye
was
artist
and
doctor,
John
Saito.
He
states
that
“Painting
keeps
me
attuned
to
my
emotions,
my
humanity,
and
my
compassion.
Medicine
allows
me
to
view
events
with
a
scientific
and
clinical
eye
and
provides
beautiful
visuals
to
recreate
on
canvas.
Although
very
different
in
many
ways,
art
and
medicine
have
found
a
balance
for
me
that
is
filled
with
beauty,
humanity,
and
warmth.”
Most
of
his
paintings
show
patients,
their
caregivers,
and
even
surgical
procedures
themselves.
Here
is
an
example
of
one
of
his
paintings,
“The
Hand‐Off,”
which
depicts
an
obstetric
scene:
 
http://www.artinmedicine.com/
 One
area
of
art
and
medicine,
however,
which
intrigues
me
the
most
is
art
therapy.
The
Cleveland
Clinic,
one
of
the
best
centers
in
the
nation,
states
that
“performing
arts,
as
they
enhance
the
medical
environment,
express
ideas
and
emotions,
and
offer
therapeutic
benefits
…
because
[art]
comforts,
elevates
the
spirit,
and
affirms
life
and
hope.”
In
most
instances,
a
patient’s
art
is
used
as
a
form
of
self‐expression,
which
is
then
interpreted
by
a
therapist
and
used
to
direct
treatment.
The

  • 9. focus
here
is
not
on
the
development
of
artistic
skills,
but
instead
on
the
revealing
of
a
patient’s
deepest
feelings
and
perceptions
through
his/her
artwork
and
imagination.
Other
fine
arts
are
also
used
because
each
has
its
own
ability
to
heal.
Dance,
for
example,
“uses
movement
to
further
the
emotional,
cognitive,
physical
and
social
integration
of
the
individual.”
 
http://projectfocus.org/educate/art‐therapy.php
(Art
Therapy
for
Children
in
Uganda)
 
http://findmeacure.com/2010/06/12/dance‐therapy/barbara_snook_leads_a_dance_therapy_class_in_duned/
(Dance
Therapy
Class)

Resources:
http://my.clevelandclinic.org/arts_medicine/default.aspx
http://www.artinmedicine.com/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_therapy

  • 10. http://www.adta.org/


 Homework
#5:
Midterm
Presentation
(see
other
email
attachment)
 
 Week
#6
Blog:
Different
Perspectives
on
Living
Longer
&
Looking
Good

 This
afternoon,
I
visited
Kathy
Brew’s
“Going
Gray”
installation
at
the
10th
Annual
ISG
Symposium.

It
was
a
very
neat
exhibit
with
a
variety
of
mediums
ranging
from
popular
magazines,
ads
from
the
mid‐1900s,
a
song
book,
a
Google
image
screenshot,
boxes
of
hair
dye,
demeaning
words
on
a
wall,
and
a
video
with
interviews
from
six
medical
specialists.
The
common
theme
was
the
topic
of
“graying”
and
how
people
(especially
women)
use
certain
measures
to
hide
signs
of
aging.

 It
was
interesting
to
note
that
all
of
the
specialists
provided
a
somewhat
different
reason
behind
the
graying
of
human
hair.
I,
however,
found
Gerald
Weissman’s
reasoning
to
seem
the
most
valid.
He
states
that
our
hair
follicles
produce
hydrogen
peroxide
(a
bleaching
agent)
throughout
our
lives.
But
at
a
certain
age
(usually
45
or
so),
our
bodies
stop
producing
the
catalase
that
destroys
it.
With
no
more
catalase
to
stop
it,
the
hydrogen
peroxide
bleaches
our
hair
before
it
emerges
from
our
skin.
The
goal
should
be
to
prevent
this
type
of
oxidative
damage
(which
also
damages
our
skin
as
we
age)
instead
of
merely
seeking
to
prevent
or
correct
color
loss.


 Similar
to
this,
nutritionist
Gary
Null
and
acupuncture
specialist
Wing
Tsang
offer
a
more
Eastern
opinion
on
how
to
prevent
aging.
They
feel
that
Americans
are
not
working
hard
enough
to
reverse
aging
(with
healthy
eating,
exercise,
etc.)
and
are
merely
seeking
to
erase
the
physical
manifestations
of
age
(with
hair
dye,
botox,
etc.)
because
they
are
“addicted
to
comfort.”
They
believe,
however,
that
it
is
essential
to
make
yourself
look
good
from
the
inside
out.
For
example,
you
wont
have
a
healthy
outward
appearance
such
as
clear
eyes
and
youthful
skin
unless
you
put
the
proper
ingredients
inside
yourself.
Anne
McEaney,
a
psychologist
who
focuses
on
eating
and
body
image,
feels
that
a
person
must
have
the
proper
attitude
about
themself
and
positive
energy
in
order
to
attract
others.
All
in
all,
it
is
clear
that
people
want
to
live
longer
and
look
younger
than
ever
before.
And
this
holds
especially
true
for
women,
who
are
often
looked
down
upon
as
they
age,
while
men
with
gray
hair
may
be
seen
as
more
knowledgeable
and
experienced.


  • 11. 

 There
are
many
beliefs
about
how
to
live
longer.
But
100‐year‐old
doctor
Robert
Bazell
(still
practicing
at
UCSF,
see
photo
above)
doesn’t
feel
that
exercise,
vitamins,
or
frequent
checkups
are
the
answer.
Instead
he
recommends
falling
in
love,
getting
married,
and
having
children.
Another
article
on
wellbeing
seems
to
support
this
notion
–
“Love,
in
all
its
manifestations,
is
unarguably
the
greatest
emotion.
Loving
and
being
loved
makes
you
happier,
stronger,
and
live
longer.”
This
love,
however,
doesn’t
need
to
be
just
a
spouse
–
it
can
be
love
for
a
pet,
a
child,
hobbies,
or
even
your
religion
…
anything
that
causes
a
person
to
live
life
to
its
fullest,
feel
happy,
and
act
as
a
sort
of
meditation.

However,
sex
has
been
linked
to
longevity
and
wellbeing,
so
there
may
be
an
additional
bonus
to
loving
a
romantic
partner.
Some
of
the
benefits
of
sex
include
the
following:
stress
relief,
increased
immune
function,
improved
heart
functioning,
increased
self‐esteem,
and
better
sleep.
 
 
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/40153870/vp/43903066#43903066
http://completewellbeing.com/article/love‐to‐live‐longer/
http://www.webmd.com/sex‐relationships/features/10‐surprising‐health‐benefits‐of‐sex?page=3

Borowski,
Rachel

  • 12. HNRS
177
20
May
2012
 Alan
Turing
Blog

 “Alan
Turing’s
Historical
&
Contemporary
Impact
on
War”
 On
September
3rd
of
1939,
Britain
declared
war
on
Germany.
Within
one
day,
Alan
Turing
arrived
at
the
British
codebreaking
house
in
the
town
of
Bletchley
(just
between
Oxford
and
Cambridge).
It
was
there
that
he
worked
with
another
Cambridge
mathematician
by
the
name
of
Gordon
Welchman
to
design
the
Bombe,
a
machine
to
break
Enigma‐enciphered
messages
sent
by
the
German
military.
This
was
just
the
first
of
five
major
cryptanalytic
advances
that
Turing
developed
during
World
War
II.
These
many
contributions
have
been
credited
with
shortening
the
war
by
several
years.
Even
beyond
that,
Turing’s
work
and
his
position
as
an
invaluable
link
between
Britain
and
the
United
States
from
1942‐43
have
shaped
the
global
post‐war
order.

 I
will
first
take
a
look
at
the
latter.
After
Japan
and
Germany
declared
war
on
the
United
States
in
December
of
1941,
Britain
gained
a
very
strong
ally.
However,
Britain
had
been
financially
dependent
upon
this
ally
(America),
especially
since
losing
all
control
of
its
colonial
and
commercial
rule
in
Asia.
Thus,
Britain
did
not
have
much
to
offer
…
except
for
Turing’s
success
with
the
Bombe.
The
U.S.
demanded
to
know
all
about
it,
so
Turing
travelled
to
the
United
States,
where
he
worked
with
the
U.S.
navy
as
the
first
ever
top‐tier
technical
liaison
between
the
two
countries.

 The
genius
of
his
work
has
by
no
means
lost
value
in
the
last
seventy
years.
In
fact,
his
ideas
led
to
the
development
of
the
first
modern
computer.
And
his
mathematical
formulas
are
being
used
today
by
scholars
at
UCSD
to
“improve
automatic
speech
recognition,
natural
language
processing,
and
other
machine
learning
software.”


Sources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Turing
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bombe
http://www.turing.org.uk/turing/scrapbook/ww2.html
http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/501440/
http://www.turing.org.uk/turing/scrapbook/ukusa.html

  • 13. 
 
 
(UCSD
Professor
Alon
Orlitsky)





 



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