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DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture
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DC Ag Communicators - Social Media for Agriculture

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This is a deck that I put together with a colleague of mine at New Media Strategies, Alex Redmond, to present to the DC Ag Communicators -- a group of professional communicators who work on behalf of …

This is a deck that I put together with a colleague of mine at New Media Strategies, Alex Redmond, to present to the DC Ag Communicators -- a group of professional communicators who work on behalf of various agriculture organizations in Washington, DC.

The content is a combination of my personal experience as a digital strategist executing dozens of social media campaigns, as well as my specific experience using social media with my family and their vineyard in Oregon (Bradshaw Vineyards | Willamette Valley, OR).

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  • 1. © 2009 | New Media Strategies www.newmediastrategies.net <br />Alex Redmond Leslie Bradshaw <br />Business Development, Mid-Atlantic June 23, 2009 Communications Manager, Public Affairs<br />DC Ag Communicators – Social Media Overview<br />
  • 2. Making Sense of Social Media: 7 Areas to Focus On<br />Emerging Platforms<br />Wikipedia<br />Blogs<br />Cloud Computing<br />Twitter<br />Media Sharing<br />Social Networks<br />2<br />
  • 3. Blogs<br />Not “just a blog” – many considerations:<br />Your organization’s blog<br />Influencer blogs<br />Employee blogs<br />Coalition / member blogs<br />Competitor / adversary blogs<br />Permanent, but imperfect – many decisions:<br />Software<br />Engagement strategy<br />Message and positioning<br />Intelligence and tracking<br /> © 2009 | New Media Strategies www.newmediastrategies.net <br />
  • 4. Blog Reading Habits of Capitol Hill<br />70%<br />Chiefs of Staff/Deputy Chiefs of Staff/Directors<br />68%<br />Communications Directors/ Press Secretaries<br />47%<br />Legislative Directors/Senior Policy Advisors/Counsel<br />47%<br />Legislative Assistants<br />Legislative Correspondents/Other<br />42%<br />Blogs<br />* Source: National Journal Group, Washington in the Information Age<br />
  • 5. Local and National Blog Consumption<br />Local Blogs<br />Wonkette<br />42%<br />49%<br />Red State<br />Hotline On Call<br />35%<br />42%<br />Townhall<br />Daily Kos<br />29%<br />39%<br />Local Blogs<br />The Corner<br />24%<br />32%<br />Hotline On Call<br />21%<br />29%<br />Talking Points Memo<br />* Source: National Journal Group, Washington in the Information Age<br />Blogs<br />The Note<br />M. Malkin<br />20%<br />23%<br />
  • 6. States Have Vibrant Blogospheres, Too<br />Blogs<br />
  • 7. Logistics<br />
  • 8. The 6 Steps to Planning and Executing a Digital Campaign<br />Set goals<br />Establish team roles<br />Brand and integrate campaign elements<br />Scope, research, understand task at hand<br />Evaluate and select platforms<br />Document everything<br />
  • 9. #1 – What Does a Win Look Like?<br />Basic metrics<br />Video views, comments and subscriptions<br />Facebook fans, Wall posts<br />Visitors and link-backs to your site and/or blog<br />Blog and Twitter buzz – quantity and impressions<br />Tonal reaction (positive/negative)<br />Benchmark reports (beginning/end; weekly/monthly)<br />How engaged, lasting, meaningful was the experience? (qual.)<br />Campaign-dependent metrics<br />Units sold<br />Actions taken (e.g., petition, contesting, etc.)<br />Voters, constituents, consumers, students or decision makers influenced<br />Lasting, Google-able resources<br />Launching point for future efforts<br />
  • 10. photo<br />NMS METHODOLOGY: This is How We Do It<br />AGGREGATE<br />social <br />websites<br />bookmarking<br />ANALYZE<br />blogs<br />message<br />FILTER<br />boards<br />social <br />networks<br />emerging<br />ACTIONABLE INTELLIGENCE<br />platforms<br />video<br />
  • 11. #2 – Establish Team Roles<br />Team: Community / Communications Management<br />Role: Communicates on behalf of the campaign, under their own name, everywhere online (think: touchy-feely spokesperson); Ensures that message and aesthetics are consistent across entire campaign (on and offline); supports Community &amp; Profile team <br />Involvement: 2 – 3 people <br />Team: Profile Management<br />Role: Populates profiles with content; works with / as Community Managers; maintains and interacts continuously<br />Involvement: 2 – 3 people<br />Team: Metrics, Reporting, Tracking, Innovating<br />Role: Ensures that goals are being set and met; makes recommendations to recalibrate based on results, emerging platforms and new goals<br />Involvement: 3 – 4 people<br />
  • 12. CHALLENGE: Digital and Geographic Divides<br />Solution: Communications Team<br />Tactic: Point people in DC manage and solicit content from Farmers<br />Solution: Profile Management Team<br />Tactic: Meet with Farmers once a quarter to scope out an approved set of messages and topics; adjust and update as needed<br />Solution: Editorial Calendar<br />Tactic: Create a master calendar for posting to platforms (e.g., blog post, tweets, etc.); receive posts from Farmers via Communications team (need only be emailed; “photo attached” would be great, too); post for / as approved Farmers<br />Solution: Digital Press Events<br />Tactic: Invite bloggers to the farm; encourage photo and video creation; create universal tag so content can be aggregated<br />
  • 13. 6 Tips: Social Media for Agriculture<br />ON THE FARM CASE STUDY: Leslie’s Family’s Farm<br /> © 2009 | New Media Strategies www.newmediastrategies.net <br />
  • 14. DIGITAL PRESS EVENT CASE STUDY: Intel<br />Worked with Intel to invite influential bloggers and media makers onsite to ISEF, resulting in:<br />776 photos on Flickr<br />160 blog posts and tweets <br />Production of nearly 40 YouTube videos <br />20 audio recordings of interviews with attendees<br />Helped manage and organize interested online communities, facilitating new connections<br />Reached over 1.5 million viewers<br />Created lasting online resources and relationships<br />Shifted previous perceptions about Intel and its dedication to education<br />
  • 15. Specific Platforms<br />
  • 16. Twitter<br /> © 2009 | New Media Strategies www.newmediastrategies.net <br /><ul><li>What is it?
  • 17. Permanency of blogging
  • 18. Utility of emailing
  • 19. Sociality of Facebook
  • 20. Agility of text / IMing
  • 21. Why join?
  • 22. Disseminate information
  • 23. Converse and share
  • 24. Build a network
  • 25. Gain insights
  • 26. Who uses it?
  • 27. The media
  • 28. Politicians
  • 29. C-level executives; decision makers
  • 30. Brands and organizations
  • 31. Online influentials</li></li></ul><li>In Fact, Twitter Has Its Own Ecosystem &amp; Economy<br />
  • 32. Organic Interest:<br /><ul><li> Media & Blog Stories: 7,000+
  • 33. Twitter Posts: 10,000+</li></ul>Results:<br /><ul><li> 3.8 million Impressions
  • 34. 55,000 Facebook users
  • 35. 10,000+ Pledges
  • 36. 16,000 video views
  • 37. 100+ blog posts
  • 38. 1,200 Tweets </li></ul>“The president made an offhand remark making fun of his own bowling that was in no way intended to disparage the Special Olympics.” <br />- Spokesman Bill Burton <br />High-Profile <br />Twitter Placements:<br /><ul><li> John Mayer
  • 39. Rosalind Wiseman
  • 40. Chicago Tribune
  • 41. Fox5 (lead to on-air)</li></ul>“I bowled a 129. … It’s like – it was like Special Olympics, or something.” <br />- President Obama<br />March 19<br />Jay Leno Show<br />March 20<br />Story explodes<br />March 31<br />Special Olympics <br />launches social media campaign with help from NMS<br />TWITTER CASE STUDY: The Special Olympics<br />April 1 - Today<br />Conversation continues…<br />
  • 42. Social Networks<br /> © 2009 | New Media Strategies www.newmediastrategies.net <br /><ul><li>What is out there?
  • 43. Facebook – friends
  • 44. Twitter – communications
  • 45. Ning – organizations
  • 46. LinkedIn – colleagues
  • 47. MySpace – A & E
  • 48. MeetUp – offline
  • 49. So I have a page, now what?
  • 50. Upload your contacts
  • 51. Relax the reins
  • 52. Spark two-way conversations
  • 53. It’s a garden: plant, water, weed, maintain; repeat.</li></li></ul><li>News Updates<br />Targeted Ads<br />Thousands of Click-Thrus<br />Shared Links<br />Dozens of Wall Posts<br />2,200+ Members<br />Donation Motivation:<br />1 Twitter follower = 100 liters of water<br />1 Facebook member = 100 liters of water<br />FACEBOOK CASE STUDY: ACC / Drinking Water<br />
  • 54. Media Sharing<br /> © 2009 | New Media Strategies www.newmediastrategies.net <br />Video – what is out there?<br />YouTube – massive reach<br />Vimeo – customizable<br />Viddler – interactive<br />Photo – what is out there?<br />Flickr – open network<br />SmugMug – closed network<br />Twitter applications – Twitpic, Utterli<br />Why you need it:<br />A picture is worth…<br />Tell your story; create a lasting resource<br />Make it compelling; short and something you’d pass on <br />Create assets to share with on and offline media outlets <br />
  • 55. “ALL CYLINDERS” CASE STUDY: C-SPAN<br /><ul><li>Transformed their image in the eyes of online influencers and tech communities
  • 56. Reengaged their core political audience through embeddable video and blogger link-backs
  • 57. Exchanged their limited advertising budget for social capital, search engine optimization (SEO), brand awareness and historical, lasting resources
  • 58. 300+ blog placements; 600+ inbound links; millions of online views</li></ul>Blogs<br />Social Networks<br />Twitter<br /> Media Sharing<br />22<br />
  • 59. Wikipedia<br /> © 2009 | New Media Strategies www.newmediastrategies.net <br /><ul><li>What are wikis?
  • 60. Collaborative resource
  • 61. Relies on “wisdom of the crowds”
  • 62. Not always accurate, buuuuut…
  • 63. Read: Here Comes Everybody (Clay Shirky)
  • 64. Why you need them:
  • 65. Define the debate at point of research: Wikipedia
  • 66. Replace internal intranets
  • 67. Create a puzzle-piece mentality that encourages more participation and knowledge-sharing
  • 68. Enable easy access
  • 69. Document evolution and keep definitions dynamic (e.g., of your issue / organization)</li></li></ul><li> © 2009 | New Media Strategies www.newmediastrategies.net <br />What tools are available?<br />Google Docs <br />Google Reader / RSS<br />Slideshare<br />Delicious<br />YouSendIt<br />TinyURLs (recommended: bit.ly)<br />“Share This”<br />Why you need them:<br />Cost effective ($0)<br />Accessible anywhere<br />Time-saving<br />Searchable; can make public<br />Cloud Computing<br />
  • 70. <ul><li>What to watch for?
  • 71. Aggregation (FriendFeed)
  • 72. Portability (Facebook Connect)
  • 73. Authentication (OpenID)
  • 74. Integration (Google Connect)
  • 75. Mobile (iPhone and BlackBerry apps)
  • 76. “Life streaming” (Qik, USTREAM)
  • 77. Status-o-sphere (Facebook, Twitter)
  • 78. Blogosphere segmentation (state level, interest based)
  • 79. What will continue to evolve?
  • 80. Boundaries: Personal / Private / Professional / Organizational
  • 81. Sharing: Anonymity / Transparency / Intimacy / Translucency
  • 82. Connectivity: Portable / Integrated / Aggregated / Authenticated</li></ul> © 2009 | New Media Strategies www.newmediastrategies.net <br />Emerging Platforms<br />
  • 83. Closing<br />
  • 84. 5 Things You Can Do Immediately<br /><ul><li>Share content, but not over email. Instead, use a single account on Delicious to store, share and tag relevant stories.
  • 85. Tips: These can be public or private (just click the “do not share” box). </li></ul> Add unlimited # of tags to help build context. Detailed repository.<br /><ul><li>URL:http://delicious.com (also: most stories have multiple “share this” functions)
  • 86. Build a blogger media list; create an engagement strategy. Identify bloggers most interested in your issues and include them early and often on breaking news, surrogate interviews and other initiatives.
  • 87. Tips: Treat bloggers like journalists, but don’t expect them to always perform like non-biased reporters. Consider having your surrogate’s blogs link back to the blogs on your list. Reciprocity rules.
  • 88. URLs:http://blogsearch.google.com (more results) and http://technorati.com (includes authority)
  • 89. Monitor Twitter. The most instant and social conversations going on about your issues are on Twitter. Blogs lag. Facebook is closed, sometimes blocked.
  • 90. Tips: On Twitter, you can take immediate action. For key conversers, investigate the Twitterer’s # of followers and if they have a blog. Have a strategy to engage / respond if needed.
  • 91. URLs:http://search.twitter.com (basic search) & http://tweetgrid.com (up to 9 terms at once) </li></li></ul><li>5 Things You Can Do Immediately (cont’d)<br /><ul><li>Place digital Op-Eds with influential blogs. Facing a limited “real estate” issue? Editorial Board uninterested? You can be just as effective by placing a guest post on state and / or national blogs. Once place, pivot back to MSM.
  • 92. Tips: Have surrogates pen for the web – links, photos and embedded videos are excepted.
  • 93. Sample sites:Huffington Post, Medical News Today, Health Bolt, My Family Doctor
  • 94. Have Farmers maintain a daily / weekly “diary.” Basically a blog, but in established communities with lots of activity. More efficient; good workaround.
  • 95. Tips: If your content is consistent and strong, and you’ve made contacts with the site administrator’s, you can get “front paged” (i.e., have your content featured on the homepage). To build credibility: make sure to comment on posts by others.
  • 96. URLs for top diary sites:http://RedState.com and http://TheNextRight.com (right-of-center); http://DailyKos.com, http://MyDD.com and http://TalkingPointsMemo.com (left-of-center); http://SoapBlox.com (state level and left-of-center)</li></li></ul><li>6 Closing Thoughts<br />Authenticity and transparency rule the day. When you are transparent, you are credible. When you are credible, you maximize your results.<br />Try to workaround, not eliminate. Stuck on Twitter? Try a disclaimer: ‘Tweets from our friends do not necessarily represent the views of healthfinder.gov.’ Unable to access actual site? Use search engines.<br />You get out what you put in. Social media is a like a pet, not furniture. Nurture, don’t walk away.<br />The marketplace is now a conversation.Are you listening, do you have a voice? And like with any conversation, listening is key.<br />It’s a relationship, are you committed? The true value of participating online is in the ability to build lasting, meaningful ties. <br />To make it work in the long run, you need infrastructure. In order to circulate your content and maximize what social media has to offer, you need to have a plan and multiple pathways. Start slow, integrate and don’t over-commit.<br />
  • 97. © 2009 | New Media Strategies www.newmediastrategies.net <br />Thank you. Questions?<br />Leslie Bradshaw<br />Blog: www.lesliebradshaw.com<br />LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/lesliebradshaw<br />Twitter: www.twitter.com/LeslieBradshaw<br />Email: lbradshaw@newmediastrategies.net<br />Phone: 703-253-0050 x 187<br />Alex Redmond<br />NMS Blog: www.newmediastrategies.net/blog<br />LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/ajredmond<br />Twitter: http://twitter.com/AlexRedmond<br />Email: aredmond@newmediastrategies.net<br />Phone: 703-253-0050 x 195<br />

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